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£^ NEW YORK 



THE OLDEST THEATRICAL PUBLICATION IN AMERICA 



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APRIL 11, 1923 



PRICE FIFTEEN CENTi 



THE NATIONAL THEATRICAL WEEKLY 



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TITE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 11, 1923 



FOREIGN NEWS 



"MAGDA" REVIVAL SCORES 

London. April 9. — In essaying the role 
of *'Magda'' in Sndermann's play of that 
name; Gladys Cooper Tvas certainly tcq- 
tnresome; especially so when one considers 
that this is a role which made famoos sndb 
remarkable actresses as Sara Bernhardt, 
Dnse and Mrs.. Pat. CampbeU. It is 
therefore^ more to her credit to say taer 
taidition was perfect and compares lavor- 
'ably with that of her predecessors. 

The stbiy tells of a young ^I, who 
leaves home to escape the tyrannies of her.- 
father, and -rctiims a woman, having 
found fame and wealth through, experiaicc 
and suffering. She returns home, but her 
•poraits, -ahnoagfa.'leving: her, find that in 
having .^me. i diild out' of wedlock she 
has committeil an offense for which all her 
(pfts of fame cannot condone. Of coarse 
m the late Victorian days such a play was 
real ; but in title prescot century it is very 
"stagey." ' Yet one cannot agree but that 
the acting of Miss Cooper was remarkable, 
and has certainly enhanced her rqnitation 
as an emotional actress of first rank. 

Others who played their parts well -were 
Fraiddy Dyall, GUbert I^re, William 
Stock and Liza Maravoan. 

The pUy was brought out at the Plajr- 
honse Theatre and looks as thou^ it is 
m for a run. 



EDCLSTEIN BANKRUPTCY HEARING 

London, April 9. — Further hearings in 
the bankruptcy proceedings of Willie 
Edelstein, theatriial managv, met last- 
week. According to the petitioii, die li- ' 
abilities are given at $20,000 and the as- 
.sets tmcollected debts to the amount oL 
?15;000. 

It appears, according to Edelstein'a 
statement, he had been interested in the - 
prodoctions of "Polly With A Past" and 
'Tie Chaim School," both of 'which 

{ir^vcd successful! until the coal stnke 'of. 
921, which turned the profits into a loss 

of jasfloo. 

He opene4 a New York office in 1914 
and continaed to et^gage in American the- 
atricals mitil March of last year, when he 
closed 'his office after having dropped a 
consideiable sum of money. 

^^he matter was left in- the hands of the 
receiver. 



BALCONY BUSINESS DROPS 

London, April 9. — Bad business in the 
ui>per floors of a number of theatres has 
been sufficiently felt to cause the with- 
drawal of several attractions. I^ondoa 
producers have foiud it unprofitable to 
produce solely for the fashionable set who 
pccupy the orchestra stalls. In order to 
make the production pay, th^ must also 
depend upon good business in the upper 
balconies and this effect is accomplished 
only when they produce a piece tlut ap- 
peals to the maisrs as well as to the intu- 
lectnala. 

The most recent production to be affect- 
ed by this condition was Robert Court- 
neidge's, "The Young Idea," which was 
withdrawn from the Savoy primarily be- 
cause it failed' to register with balcony and 
gallery andiences. ' '- 

"The Laughing Lady" seems to have' 
run up against a similar snag. The pro- 
duction cost and heavy operating expenses 
are so heavy that if it does not attract 
near capacity it cannot make ends meet 

This state of affairs is giving the Brit- 
iA producers much food for thought, and 
many are in a quandary as to just what 
sort of attraction that will appeal to the 
"gallery gods" .will also find a demand 
among the better classes. 

•WEVITABLE" IS CLEAN FLAY 

London, April 9. — ^The production of 
,"The Inevitable," on March 21, marked 

' the reappearance of Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
Curzoo (Isabel Jay), and the d£but of 
tiieir daughter, whose stage name is- Ce- 
dlia Cavendish. More interest was dis- 

• playol in the cast, apparently, than in the 
play itself. The acting was fair all around, 
but- die oiistanding success was scored by 
Etid Coleridge. a&-a comic stage-dreSser. 

' The story of the play concqms a great 
'actress who,' in the height of^^Et^ career, , 
suddenly finds herself confrobtbl with the 
fia that she is getting to old jp <k> ingenue 
para:-' V Her daughter arrivcK^frpm school 
aad 'o^'fcading playwright deddes to. offer 
tlie^girrdie I^dii^ part-in his new play;' 
a piart originally, meant for the mother. 

<,3rh« mother accepts' the position diplo- 
'matically and inevitably, ^raich accounts 
for the title. - 



: TRUCES RUINING SHOW BUSINESS 

' London, April 9.— That high taxatioii is 
lolling the theatrical industry here; was' 
the- gist of an address made b^ Sir Os^ 
wald StoU at the annual meetmg of the 
CoSseon Syndicate, Ltd., recently held 
' her^ He added that too many people 
closed their eyes to the fact that me enter- 
tainment industry was working in Chains 
almost too heavy to bear. He advised 
aeldng for legislation that would lighten 
the taxation burden of the theatre men. 



"MERTON" OPENING 

London,. April . -9. — ^°Merton of the - 
Movies" will open at- the Shaftesbury 
Theatre the end of this month with Tom 
Douglas, ' an American, in the title role. 
It Will be produced by Mr. Robert Court- 
neidge in conjunction with Messrs. Gtoss- 
mith and Malone. 



. ;DRINKWATER ESTATE £4.600 • 

! iioNDON. April 9. — Albert Edwin Drink- 
water, actor and theatre manager, and 
father of John Driokwater, who died re- 
cently, left an estate of £4,(300. He left a 
wish that after death his body be examined 
by [two doctors to ascertain bis absolnte 
de^h, and then his body be cremated, the 
ashes to be dispersed at burial. 



ARNAUT BROS. SCORE 

London, April 9. — The Amaut Brothers 
an>eared last week at the Finsbury Park 
&npire and received a special command 
to appear before ' the King and Queen at 
Carlstoa House Terrace. - The boys are 
laying off for a week and will resume their 
Moss tour in the Provinces shortly. 



"RAINBOW" POSTPONED 

London, Ajnil 9.— "The Rainbow," the 
new revue ?vfaidi Sir Alfred Butt was to 
have launched at the Empire Theatre, in 
association with Albert de Courville, has 
been postponed until the renovations of the' 
playhouse have been completed. 

AMERICAN ACT FOR SO. AFRICA 

London, April 9. — ^La Veen and Cross, 
the American burlesque acrobats who 
have become great favorites with the Lon- 
don andiences, have sailed for South 
Africa to fulfill engagements -with the 
African Theatres, Ltd. 



,.' WARHELD COMING OVER • 

London, April 9. — C B. Cochran has 
arranged to bring over David Warfield, 
whom he 'will probably present in "The 
Merchant of Venicel" Local theatre-go- 
ers are looking forward witb much in- 
terest to Waifiekl's portrayal of "Shy- 
kxi:.- 



MAUD ALLAN RETURNS 

London, April 9. — Miss Maud Allan, the 
famous Salome dancer, has returned to 
London, opening at the Alliambra last 
week. One of the dances she is doing is 
an interpretation of the Hungarian Ra- 
koczy march. 



SHORT RUN FOR 'ONEVrTABLE" 

London. April 9. — Despite the popular- 
ity of Isabel Jay. her new play, "The In- 
evitable." failed to catch on at the St 
James Theatre and was withdrawn after 
four performances. 



MELVILLE GIDEON EXAMINED 

LoKDON April 9. — ^The public examina- 
tion of Melville Joseph Gideon, composer 
and entertainer, and member of the Co- 
Optimists, was concluded in the Bank- 
ruptcy Court last week. His statement of 
affairs showed liabilities $21,320 and assets 
of $4,000. 

Grtdeon has satisfied all creditors in his 
1913 feilure, having paid them in fulL He 
attributed his present failure to extra- 
vagance and high interest on txnrowed 
monc^. He further stated that he was 
drawing a salary of $250 per -week as one 
of the Cb-Optimists, and a percentage of 
the net profitSi 

Gideon called a meeting of his creditors 
last November and offered to pay them off 
at a rate of ^50 per week and the whole 
of his r<^yalties he was receiving as a 
song writer until he had satisfied their 
clamis. The money was to be paid to a 
trustee and he confidently expected to have 
wiped out the obligations by June 1, 1923. 

CAPACITY PLAY WITHDRAWN 

London, April 9. — ^"Treasure Island," 
which Arthur Bourchier was presenting 
at the Strand Theatre was withdrawn last 
week while plajring to practically capacity 
business. The reason assigned for the 
play's withdrawal is that Mr. Bourchier, 
who plays the' part of John Silver in 
"Treasure Island" is losing his health be- 
cause of the continual strain and exertion 
caused by making up for the part which 
calls for a man with a peg leg. His phy- 
sicians have' forbiddet^ him to contmue 
with the part for- fear of a permanent in- 
jury to his healtfa. 

Mr. Bourchier has not totally abandoned 
the idea of running .this'play.. As a mat- 
ter of fact it is 'his intention to run it 
as an annual affair, , like "Peter Pan," and 
VCharlie's Aunt" 



MUNDORF SIGNING ACTS FOR U. S. 

London, April 9. — Harry - Mundorf, of 
the B, F. Keith Vaudeville Exchange, of 
which he is the European representative, 
has been scouting ' around- London in 
search of new -talent He gave an audi- 
tion to Miss 'Alex Andra; a musician and 
songstress, -and it is possible that the 
young woman will be seen .in America 
shortly. In private life Miss Andra- is the 
wife of Tex MaCIeod, who is doing a 
yam and rope spinning act, which made 
him popular throughout England and 
Scotland. . . 



BIG l»MAND FOR REVUES . 

London, April 9.— "The Nine O'Qock 
Revue" has proved to be so clever that 
its authors, Morris Harvey and Harold 
Simpson, l^ve been approached to write 
revues for several theatrical producers. 
They have just accepted a commission to 
write a revue for C B. Cochran which he 
will produce at the Pavilion Theatre -at 
the end of the "Robin Hood" film, which 
is still doing good business. The prin- 
cipal part in the new revue will be played 
by Stanley Lupino. 

NEW 'TOLLV OPENS 

London, April 9.— A new "Polly," hav- 
ing no resemblance to the Bax version, 
opened last week at the Chelsea Palace 
Theatre, produced by the Gay Operas, 
Ltd. Mr. H. Bernhardt an agent for con- 
cert artists, is the principal person respon- 
sible for the production: In the cast are 
Foster Richardson of the Beecham Opera 
as Macheath, Winifred O'Connor as 
"Polly" and Jean Aylwin as Jenny Diver. 



"YOUNG IDEA" WITHDRAWN 

London, April 9.— "The Young Idea," 
Noel Coward's comedy, which recdved 
fine support from the press, did not re- 
ceive the same supiiort from the public in 
general, and was withdrawn last week 
from the Savoy, where it had been play- 

^Tie Box version of "Polly" came into 
the Savoy from the Kingsway Theatre. 



UPROAR AT COLORQ> SHOW 

London, April 9. — Cheers and boos, 
mingled together, came from the audi- 
ence which attended the premiere of 
Albert de Courville's Anglo-American 
negro production, "Rainbow," at the 
Empire, at the finale of the show. 
They started when George Gershwin, 
the American composer of the show, 
made a speech of thanks in response 
to what consisted at first of cheers and 
then became interspersed with boos. 
The same followed for De Courville 
when he made his appearance. 

As the latter concluded. Jack Edge, 
a comedian, ran out of the 'wings and 
shouted, "Ladiips and Gentlemen." I 
was engaged as the low -comedian in 
this show but was not given a chance." 
At first the remark was taken as a 
belated joke, but when the horrified 
expressions on the faces of the rest of 
the company became apparent, it was 
known that the remark was ad libbed 
and not in the book. De Courville 
apologized for the remark. 

"The English daOies, with the excep- 
tion of one, spoke well of - the show, 
playing up Grace Hayes, and the other 
Americans. Edge did not appear in the 
cast after the opening night 



"THE BORDERER" SCORES 

London, April 9.— "The Borderer" 
opoied at the King's Theatre, Hammer- 
smith, last week and proved a distinct 
success. Mr. Fred Teny presented the 
play in which his wife, Miss Julia Neil- 
son, is featured. The production is an 
historical affair. Miss Ndlson appearing 
. in the role of Mary, Queen of Scots. Miss 
Neilson is now fully recovered from her 
recent illness. 



, "ISABEL, EDWARD AND ANNE" 
CAST 

' London, April 9. — The full cast for the 
new Gertrude Jeening^s play, "Isabel, Ed- 
ward and'Anne^" wmch succeeded "Plus 
Fours" at the Haymarket Theatre on 
Easter E^ included Margaret Banner- 
man, Lillian Braithwaite, Athene Seylcr, 
.Dorothy Overend, Allan Aynsworth and 
Harold French. 



PEGGY RETURNS TO FILM ' 

London, April 9.— Miss Peggy Hyland, 
; who is now appearing on the spoken stage 
at the Ambassadors Theatre in "A Little 
Bit of FlufT' will not leave the pictures 
permanently. Immediately after her pres- 
ent vehicle is withdrawn, she will resume 
her film activities. 



VARIETY VETERANS TOURING 

London, April 9. — The Veterans of 
Variety, having finished their London en- 
gagements, have started their tour of the 
provinces. Last week thc>- appeared at 
the Brighton Hippodrome, where they 
proved unusually popular. 



JEAN BEDINI IN ACCIDENT 

London, April 9. — ^Jean Bedini, the 
American burlesque producer, who came 
across to stage "'You'd Be Surprised," was 
injured -when a Cunard train boat over- 
Stepped the mooring and crashed into the 
docks. 



DOROTHY DICKSON RETURNS 

London, April 9. — Miss Dorothy Dick- 
son, leading lady in "The Cabaret Girl" at 
the Winter Gardens, has just returned 
from Switzerland where she has been for 
the past four weeks. 



GLADYS COOPER IN "MAGDA" 

London, April 9.— Miss Gladys Cooper 
opened at the Playhouse Theatre last 
week in "Magda," Sir Gerald du Maurier 
making the presentation. 



Copyright, 1923, ud pnhlUhcd wctUr t>y Uia Qlpper CoipantkB, ItSt Bra^wmr, Nc« York. Entered at the PM OOcc ai Nav YaA. Jam 34. II7>. aa 

(ecmd daaa nuil tDattcr ander an of Hanh 3, 1879 



Foanded hw 
FRANK QUEEN. 



1853 



NEW YORK. APRIL II. 1923 



VOLUME LXXI No. 10 
Price Fifteen Ccnia. 85.00 a Ymr 



SCORES OF SHOWS REHEARSING 
FOR E ARLY SPRIN G OPENINGS 

Few Are Scheduled for Summer Runs but Majority Are in Nature 
of Trial for Fall Engagonents — ^New Ptoducere to 
Try Hands This Season 



More than a score of new productions 
bave gone into rdiearsal during the past 
wedc and are being readied for an early 
Spring showing. While some are intended 
for runs during the stunmer, here and else- 
where, it is to be expected that in most 
cases the producers will exercise manager- 
ial prerogative and relegate many of 4hem 
in "moth balls" until the autumn. 

Practically every representative firm of 
producers will be represented in the above 
complement with at least one, and in most 
cases several, productions. Dominating the 
list, however, is a goodly portion of newr 
covers, who seem to have sufficient faith 
in their wares to invest their time and 
money in the respective productions which 
they are about to bring forth. 

The newer element were undoubtedly 
spurred on to take a chance through one of 
the several freak plays Fate has made with 
the theatrical deck of cards this season. 
Perhaps the outstanding object lesson is 
the phenomenal success of "The Last 
Warning," which established such I'enfant 
producers as Messrs. Mindlin and Gold- 
rcyer. Other youngsters who have dabbled 
with one branch or other of theatricals are 
e(]ually confident of their proposed produc- 
tions and will attempt to emulate the good 
fortune of the "two Mikes." 
. Probably the most ambitious plans from 
the newer element are those of the Mel- 
t>oume-Arden Productions, Inc., a new- 
comer in the theatrical producing line, but 
who have sufficient faith in their convic- 
tions to promise no less than three produc- 
tions for Spring perusal. Their list in- 
cludes "In tiie Balance," a melodrama in 
three acts, by Daisy Wolf; "The Greater 
Law," an adaptation of the Swedish play, 
"Mother," by Arvid Paulson, and a musical 
comedy, "My Gal Sal," with book and 
lyrics by Frank Williams and music by 
George Kramer. The first two pieces will 
be given a Spring hearing and then put 
away until fall, while the musical play is 
destined for a summer run in either New 
York or Chicago. 

Messrs. WAer and Gomstock will be 
represented with "Fires of Spring," a new 
play by Robert McLaughlin, the Cleveland 
stock impressario and best remembered as 
the author of "The Eternal Magdalene." 

A. H. Woods will reopen the revised ver- 
sion of "Naughty Diana" and will also 
bring out another non-musical piece, which 
is as yet without title. 

Joseph Shea, the indefatigable producer, 
who gave us "On the Stairs" and "Hail and 
Farewell," has lined up another called 
"Chivalry," which will open out of town at 
an early date and be brought directly to 
New York. 

Louis Werba, who has returned to the 
producing field and is already represented 
with "Bamum Was Right," will launch a 



new musical comedy, "Adriennei" within a 
few weeks, while Louis Qine, formerly as- 
sociated with George Broadhurst, is stak- 
ing his bankroll on a piece by Ethel Clay- 
ton, the vaudeville actress-author, entitled 
"For Value deceived." Even William A. 
Brady has ceased to concern himself with 
the legality of Sunday^ performances to 
produce his second musical play, "Pansy," 
which he acquired abroad and for -which 
Joe McCarthy and Harry Tiemey will 
supply the jingles and times. 

And by no means the least of all is 
George M. Cohan's annual musical pro- 
duction, this time "The Rise of Rosie 
O'Reilly," which will lighten the burden of 
the Bostonians during the warm spell, when 
it will be firmly entrenched at the Tremont 
Theatre. 

Henry W. Savage will be amply repre- 
sented by Mitzi in her new comedy, witfi 
music, "Minnie and Me," which has already 
had trial performances in New England 
and which will shortly make its bow in the 
Hub. 

Carle Carlton is rushing things to have 
"The Javanese Doll" among the list, and 
if he doesn't have a change of heart in the 
meanwhile, New York will also have a 
glimpse of "Paradise Alley." Brock Pera- 
bcrton-, too, may be represented with a sum- 
mer song show, it being a musicalized ver- 
sion of "Good Gracious, Anabelle," which, 
in the newer dress, will be known as 
".^nnabelle." 

Other producers who will be represented 
in the list and their attractions' follow: 
William Hawthorne, "Daisy Won't Tell"; 
Messrs. Cook and Ahrens, "Struttin' 
Along"; George Lederer, "Suzette"; Rob- 
ert McLaughlin, "Bristol Glass"; Davidow 
and Le Maire, "Helen of Troy, N. Y."; 
Jack Schulmann, "Pretty Polly"; Mack 
HiUiard, "Within Four Walls"; Myron C. 
Fagan, "Thumbs Down"; George Byron 
Totten, "Gabette," and Jamie Kelly, "For- 
gotten Sweethearts." 

According to our statistics, the margin of 
spring tryouts scheduled for the spring 
season of this year greatly overshadows 
that of last season. All of which argues 
that, despite the inactivity of several of the 
established producers, the producing game 
is by no means on the -wane. 

Of Hie promised lot, just how many will 
survive their "dog showings" will be a mat- 
ter of interest and just how many we shall 
ever have an opportunity of glimpsing is 
"something else again, Mawruss," as Abe 
Potash would say. 

Nevertheless this unusual spring activity 
will provide employment for hundreds of 
actors and others who would otherwise be 
enjoying enforced vacations during the 
summer. 



P. M. A.-A. E. A. COMMITTEES MEET 

The committees representing the Pro- 
ducing Managers' Association and the 
Actors' Equity Association to confer . on 
the extension of the 1919 agreement held 
the second of a series of conferences in 
the headquarters of the P. M. A, on 
Monday afternoon, Messrs, Thomas, 
Brady, Lee Sfaubert and Edgar Selwyn 
represented the P. M, A., while the Equity 
was represented by John Emerson, Frank 
H. Gillmore, Florence Reed and John 
Willard. The conference lasted two hours 
with no announcement coming forth as to 
what occurred. It is understood that the 
Equity members still stood firm on their 
demand that the Equity closed shop be 
granted in 1924 and would not recede in 
any manner from this' stand. The man- 
agers tried stratgetic manoeuvers, but 
were not in any way able to break down 
the barrier erected by the actors' body, 
who came instructed to get the closed 
shop. Another meeting of the joint com- 
mittees will be held next Monday. 



LOOKING FOR TDMBERG CAST 

The Health Department of New Yoric 
is on the outlook for die east of tfae 
recently closed Hemam Timberg Unit 
Show, "Frolics of 1922," which cloud 
recently in Philadelphia. 

Tryce Fristoe, musical director of the 
show, was taken ill in Philadelphia and re- 
mained after the piece closed. His ailment, 
according to the Health Department offi- 
cials, has developed into smallpox and 
the officials are searching for the members 
of the cast in order to ascertain if others 
are infected with the contagious disease. 



GIVES UP TO FRAUD CHARGES 

FoBT WOBIH, April 9.— Dr. Frederick 
A. Cook, who claimed to have discovered 
the North Pole and made a vaudeville tour 
upon bis return to the United States, tell- 
ing audiences how it looked and all about 
his trip in the frozen nortli, was named 
here in complaints charging the use of the 
mail to defraud, filed against a number of 
Fort Worth oil promoters, gave himself 
up to Federal authorities. 

He was released on $25,000 bail. 



NEW HOUSE FOR WASHINGTON 

Washington, D. C, April 9. — Ground 
will be broken shortly for the erection of 
the largest theatre in the city when com- 
pleted, to be known as the Cosmopolitan. 
The house will be situated at the corner 
of E. and I3th, street, N. W., iust off 
Pennsylvania avenue and in the heart of 
the hotel and theatre district. 



OLD TIME "MELO." TO TOUR 

"The Crimson Glow," a melodrama of 
the old school, is being prepared for a 
tour of the middle west, where according 
to the heavy takings of the Raymond 
Hitchcock snow, "Hitchy koo," much 
ready money is laying idle. Harry Aus- 
tin, who was identified with Charles E. 
Blaney in the days of the latter's reigri 
of "melodrama lung" is sponsoring the 
production. 



PALACE AFTER THE TICKETS SPECS 

With the employment of eight private 
detectives and the use of several regular 
policemen the battle which for the past two 
weeks between the Palace Theatre, the 
vaudeville house, and the ticket speculators, 
two of whom have offices near the theatre, 
will be fought to a fim'sb by the Palace. 

Instructions were given uiis week to 
Elmer Rogers, manager of the tfacatrc, to 
bar all persons who present tickets pur- 
chased of the speculators. 

The battle is beiiK waged under the 
personal direcUon of E. F. Albec, who de- 
clares that the ticket speculator is to be a 
thing of the past in so far as the Palace 
Theatre is concerned, 

Speculating with the tickets of this the- 
atre has_ been very renumerative^ street 
agendes in the vicinity carrying little else. 
They have brought as high as ^ to $4 
apiece_ and higher on Saturday aod Stm- 
day nights. One instance is on record of 
a street speculator who sold three Palace 
tickets for $1& On each side of the the- 
atre's entrance big signs warning patrons 
against purchasing tickets from sidewalk 
men or speculators are displayed. 

AGDTIS OUT TO DEFEAT BOX 

Chicago, April 9.— The agenU of Chi- 
cago are raising a fond of $3fl)0 to defeat 
the bill, fathered by Senator Dailw in tls 
Illinois Senate, seeking to prohibit theat- 
rical booking agents h-om charging more 
than three per cent commission. 

Two years a^o a similar bill was intro- 
duced in the Illmois Legislature, the asents 
at that time raising a fund of $2,0^) to 
fight it. 

EQUITY TO REVIVE '^SWEET NELL" 

"Sweet Nell of Old Drory" is the play 
selected for a revival by an Equity Cast 
in which Laurette Taykir will be starred 
during the Equity Festival period bet^ 
ning at the Equity-Forty-cigfath Street 
Theatre on May 7. 

This play was produced about twenty 
years ago by Klaw and Erlanger at the 
Knickerbocker Theatre with .^da Rehan 
playing the title role. 

I . To know 
hew good a cigarette 
really can be madi 
you must try a^^ 



LUCI 
STRIKE 

*irSTOASTED-> 



IVI 



F(0^ Sml« namtm 
at »tmam AtUrm 



'SlirsStasz BROOKS-MAHIEU R. Y. C. 



4 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April li, 1923 



PICTURE THEATRES BIDDING HIGH 
FOR OPERA AND CONC ERT SINGERS 

Radios HurtiiiB the Bunness Greatly in Central- and Western 
Fart* of the Country — Picture No Longer Strong Enough 
and Audiences Are Partial to Artistic Singers. 



Open and concert artists are very much 
in demand by large motion picture theatres 
througfaont the Central and Midwest to 
bolster op business. The theatres in tfaat 
section of the country have been depending 
mostly. for the past few years on their 
feature pictures, large orchestras and flash 
vaudeville and dancing turns to draw in 
the trade. This sort of policy of late 
seems to be worn out with the owners of 
the theatres attempting to devise other 
features to bring in the patronage. 

Last week Charles R. Hammerslougfa, 
business manager for Mme. Matzenatier, 
the opera star, declined .$10,000 for the 
services of the star for a period of eight 
days. The offer was fitMn F. L. Corn- 
well, owner of the Lc Claire Theatre, a 
new motioo picture palace in Moline, III., 
who wanted her for the opening bill for 
the theatre. The offer was declined due 
to lime. Matzenauer having concert en- 
gagements to fill. 

According to K. V. Fuller, New 'York 
representative for Comwell, the latter is 
willing to pay the sum offered to Mme. 
Mji,»iuii«i to recognized opera and con- 
cert sneers for his theatres in St. Louis 
and Molme. For the St Louis house Corn- 
well lias already engaged. Herman Wer- 
rmrath, Amu Case and Louise Gravnre. 
He says that negotiations are pending now 
with several opera stars who recently 
dosed their engagements with the OiiagD 
Opera Company and the Metropolitan 
Opera Company of New York. 



With the advent of the new McVidcar's 
Theatre into the field in Chica^, Balaban 
and Katz and Lubliner and Trinz, who 
control a large number of de luxe motion 
picture theatres in that city have been 
sounding out the operatic field for possi- 
bilities. They say that this style of the- 
atre has educated its patrons into being 
music lovers due to the large orchestras 
that are used in them. The liking for 
music has caused the patrons to shtm 
various types of -vaudeville flash and dance 
offerings that have been offered them with 
the result that the managers feel that now 
is the proper time to continue their musical 
education and likine by bringing on a 
score of opera stars who can be heard for 
a nominal price of admission. 

Not alone in Chicago but in a score of 
Western cities which have the larger pic- 
ture theatres the patrons seem to be de- 
serting the theatres due. to the jack of what 
they term "substantial and high class" en- 
tertainment. The ballad singer and music 
plueser are no more tolerated or engaged, 
as the patrons through the means of the 
radio are able to hear the voices of some 
of the most celebrated opera stars. 
Through the radio craze the picture houses 
have ^len off in patronage and the own- 
ers feel that with the opera stars having 
a six-month or so vacation they can use 
their services to advantage at a substantial 
outlay which would be warranted by the 
business whidi would accrue by the appear- 
ance of big stars in their theatres. 



PROTEST ON "NW GAL SAL" TITLE 

Ednard B. Marks, the music publisher, 
has ' threatened injunctive proceedings 
zffuast the Melboume-Arden Produc- 
tions, Inc^_ to restrain the producing firm 
from ri-Hiiininng with' theiT contemplated 
musical comedy, "My Gal SaL" 

Marks maintains that die appropriation 
of the thie is an infringement of the 
cop3rright of the late Paul Dresser's 
ballad classic of the same titles He has 
cotnmunicated his views to the producing 
company, who have placed the matter in 
the hands of their attorney for readjust- 
ment. Maries further avers that the title 
rights of "My Gal Sal" is duly protected 
ODder copyright, not only as a song but 
as a title for a play or motion pictures, 
and tibat before he will_ permit the pro- 
dnetioa to be launched its sponsors must 
make the necessary arrangsnoits with 
the heirs of the late composer, whom he 
represents. 

M. H. Arden, managing director of the 
producing firm, stated bist week that he 
waa gomg ahead with the details of the 
production pending the de<3sion of his 
attorney. 



ROBBERS GET KEITH PAYROLL 

Chicago, April 7. — Tim Keeler, asso- 
ciated with C S. HnmphrCT in the B. F. 
Keith offices was retnniing from the Lake- 
State bank whidi is situated on die second 
floor of the State-Lake building and while 
riding b e tw e en the second and fifth floors 
of the building he was jostled by five men 
and teUeved of the Keidi pay roll con- 
taining nearly one thousand dollars. The 
Keidi ofiSces are located on die fifth floor 
of the -State-Lake bnflding. Keelo- did 
not miss the money until be arrived in die 
office, a few seconds after leaving die 
elevator, but was too late to apprehend 
the men. who made a quick get-4way. 



ACTTRESS LOSES BIG SUIT 

June Avis Evans, an actress, who filed 
a claim against the estate of the late Dan 
R. Haima, alleging that $17,500 was due 
her according to a promise of Hanna to 
give her an annuity of $15,000 had her 
complaint dismissed by Surrogate George 
A. Slater in White Plains, N. Y., on die 
ground that it was improperly presented. 

The Surrogate ruled that a compulsory 
accounting should be first demanded of 
the executors and then the claim should 
be presented. Counsel for Miss Evans 
said they would take that course and push 
the claim, which will be opposed by the 
heirs of Hanna. 

In the complaint Miss Evans alleged 
that Hanna made a setdement in her 
favor, for life, in May, 1921, upon her 
promise to marry him. The agreement 
was later modified, being changed that she 
received money monthly instead of quar- 
terly, and on October 14, 1921, it was 
agreed that it would be continaed for life, 
. when she acceded to his request that their 
engagement be terminated. 

Counsel for the estate say the claim is 
oudawed, as it was not presented three 
months after Hanna's death, which oc- 
curred on November 3. 1921. 



RAYMOND McKEE MARRIES 

Raymond McKee, screen star, and 
Mar^ret Conrtot, screen actress, were 
married at the Little Chnrcfa Around the 
Corner on April 4. The couple were 
diilifiiood awcethearts, having been broogfat 
op togetber in the same town in ' New 
Jersey. 



NO ALIMONY FOR DANCER 

llano Paulo, who appears as one of 
the Samoan natives in "Rain," and who 
is known in private life as James C. Pall, 
frustrated a claim for alimony and counsel 
fees brought by Mrs. May Myrtle Pall 
last week in the Supreme Court. 

Mrs. Pall admitted that there had been 
no ceremony but brought the action as 
the common law wife of the actor, whom 
she said she met white touring with a 
drcus last year. She is a dancer and is 
said to be earning $75 per wedc, while 
Paulo's salary is given as $45. 

Justice Bijur refused to sustain the 
action. 



ACTORS' FUND ELECTION MAY IS 

The annual meeting and election of the 
Actor's Fund wilt take place on Tuesday 
afternoon, May 15, at the Hudson The- 
atre. Daniel Frohman, who has been 
president of the Fund since 1904, was 
nominated for reelection at a director' and 
trustees' meeting held last Thursday night 
Besides Frohman the nominating committee 
consisting of Robert Campbell, Hany Har- 
wood and Bernard A. Reinold, slated the 
following for re-election: F. F. Mackay, 
first vice-president; Charles B. Wells, sec- 
ond vice-president; Samuel Scribner, 
treasurer and Walter Vincent, secretary. 

For the three-year term as trustees they 
nominated, James L. Lasky, Henry Da- 
zian. John Cope, Walter C Jordan Robert 
T. Haines and Edmund Breeze. The lat- 
ter is to take the place of Blanche Bates 
whose term expired. For a two-year term 
to succeed Joseph Herbert, R. H. Bum- 
side was nominated. 

Due to the illness of iMessrs. Frohman 
and Mackay, second vice-in-esident Wells 
presided at the meeting. 

'He announced tfaat in conformance with 
the will of Dora Goldwaithe, an actress of 
a former generation, a bronze tablet had 
been made by Tiffany setting forth diat 
Louis Atdrich was the founder of the home. 
Ttie tablet will be placed in the Actor's 
Fund Home on Staten Island this week. 
The tablet, reads : "Louis Aldrich, Projec- 
tor and Founder, 1901." Widi die erection 
of the tablet the Fund gets $5,000 for use 
for the home and $5,000 additional to be 
used for charitable work of the home in 
aiding destitute performers. 

Ralph Delmore, one of the trustees of 
the Fund was reported as being seriously 
ill at the Staten Island Hospital from a 
complication of diseases. Four guests of 
the home were reported as having been in 
that institution within the past month widi 
all of them returning to the home but Mrs. 
Alice Adams who is said to tie seriously 
ill. 

A report was made that big results are 
expected from the benefit perforrnance for 
the fund which will take place in Boston 
on April 27. 



ARLINGTON SUES LEDERER 

George W. Ledercr is made defendant 
in an action begun in the Third District 
Municipal Court last week, by Paul Ar- 
lington, costumer, who sedcs to recover 
the sum of $1,000 on the grounds that 
the producer fraudulently misrepresented 
certain facts to 'htm. 

In his complaint. Arlington alleges 
that Lederer was president of the. Pelen 
Producing Co., Inc., which put out the 
musical show entitled "Peaches," and 
that a bill for costumes was incurred by 
the organization. On February 17th, 
1923. while "Peaches" was playing Bt 
Ford's Theatre, Baltimore, Arlington 
claims that he attached the box offices ro- 
ceipts_ of the house for $1,400, 'and was 
prevailed upon to withdraw the attach- 
ment by Lederer who told him that A. L. 
Erlanger was going to interest himself 
finanaally in "Peaches," and diat Sri- 
anger's representatives would pay the 
mon^ due Arlington by the 20th, of the 
month, three days later. 

Erlanger failed to interest himself in 
the show as Lederer told him he would. 
Arlington further complains, and had he 
not withdrawn his attachment, would 
have received $1,000 which was in the 
box office. 



EQUITY HELPS STRANDED SHOW 

The Manhattan Players, a travelling 
rep show stranded in Beaumont, Texas 
last week. The Actors' Equity Associa- 
tion forwarded two hundred dollars upon 
request of the deputy, Frank Gallagher, 
to relieve distress among the members of 
the company and furnish them with 
transportation. 



MEEHAN WRITES MUSICAL PLAY 

George H. Cohan has accepted from 
John Median a new musical comedy which 
he will produce next season. Meehan 
wrote the book and lyrics and Ray Per- 
kins supplied the music 



MRS. CARTER BUYS HOME 

Mrs. Leslie Carter has purchased a home 
in the suberbs of Los Angeles and vtrill take 
up her permanent residence there. She 
leaves for the Coast this week. Mrs. 
Carter who appeared in "The Grde" with 
John Drew on tour this season will prob- 
ably star in "Lillies of the Field" on tour 
next season. 



CHICAGO SLUMP CONTINUES 

Chicago, April 7. — One new play is 
promised the playgoers this coming week. 
"Bristol Glass," a new comedy by Booth 
Tarldngton and Harry Leon Wilson will 
move into the Blackstone Monday night 
following "The Last Warning" which will 
wend its way westward after tonight's 
performance. Few shows are playing to 
even a fair business at present. 

"The Crooked Square" with Constance 
Binney will leave the "Princess" tonight 
after a brief run of only four weeks and 
this house will remain dark next week 
pending the arrival of "Steve" in which 
Eugene O'Brien is featured. 

"The Cat and the Canary" still holds 
on at the LaSalle. "Sally" is doing good 
business at the Colonial, but not up to ex- 
pectations. "Peter Weston" with Frank 
Keenan, is doing the best business of any 
dramatic show in town, playing to good 
houses at all performances at the Harris. 
"For All of Us" at die Studebaker is 
holding its own, going into its twenty-sec- 
ond week and establishing a record this 
season at this house. Next week will see 
the end of "The Rear Car" with Taylor 
Holmes at the Cort which has had a poor 
run during the six weeks of its engage- 
ment here. The Geor^ Cohan comedy, 
"Two Fellows and a Girl" is doing nicely 
at the Grand. 

Only three weeks more for "Light 
Wines and Beer" at the Woods when this 
house will play pictures. "Blossom 
Time" is not doing good business at the 
Apollo. George White's "Scandals" is 
holding up at the lUincris. "Up the 
Ladder^ which moved over to the Sbubert 
Central is trying to establish itself in this 
little playhouse. "Peter and Paula," 
which opened this week at the Playhouse 
has taken hold of the public and diould 
be good for a fair run. "Tangerine'' now 
at the Shubert Garrick is doing only a 
fair business. 

"Hurricane" with Olga Petrova at the 
Selwyn got a break with the critics and 
should prosper for a while. "Loyalties'* 
received splendid press criticism, although 
only booked for a short run should do well 
here. "Thurston," who always enjoys a 
following in this dty is doing his share of 
business at the Olympic The Moscow 
Art Theatre has taken this town by storm 
and doing big business at the Great North- 



ACTRESS WAR CLAIM SETTLED 

Barbara Allen appearing in "Secrets" at 
the Fulton Theatre last week settled a claim 
against the German Government for losses 
she incurred when the ' Arabic was sunk in 
August, 1916, by a submarine. 

Miss Allen was on the steamship re- 
turning to the United States to resume her 
role in "A Pair of Silk Stockings," when 
the ship was torpedoed during the night 
off the Coast of Ireland. Miss Allen es- 
caped in the last lifeboat wearing her night 
clothes and a sealskin sacque. After eight 
hours at sea the occupants of the life boat 
were picked up by a mine sweeper and 
taken to Queenstown. 'Miss Allen lost all 
her belongings and baggage including a 
quantity oi jewelry. She made out a claim 
of her losses at the time to the British 
Government and last week was notified by 
the British Consulate that a setdement had 
been made on her claim by the German 

fovemment Miss Allen will receive $2,- 
50 for her losses. 



SUES NOVELIST CAINE 

Supreme Court Justice Newburger 
granted an attachment arainst the property 
in this country of Hall Caine, the novelist, 
to Harv«- K. Fly, of 9 Barrow street, on 
a claim filed by the latter for $5,000. Fly 
stated that Caine commissioned him to sell 
the film rights of "The Master of Man" 
and says that the Goldwyn firm tiought the 
rights for $50,000. He contends diat $5,000 
is a reasonable commissiotf 

SHERMAN FOR "CASANOVA" 

Arrangements were made last -week by 
Al H. Woods whereby he will loan the 
services of Lowell Sherman, star of 
"Morphia" to Gilbert Miller next season. 
Miller will present Sherman in "Casa- 
nova," an adaptation of a Spanish play by 
H. Lorenzo Agurtis. 



April 11, 1923 



THE NEW 

} V 



YORK CLIPPER 



ONE NIGHT STAND SHOWS FEAR 

NEXT SEASON W IU BE POOR 

New Tjrpe of Theatre Manage Looks with Suspicion on High 
Priced Shows and Leaning ToMrard Picture and Vaude- 
ville Policy Makes Booking Very Difficult 



Popular priced attractions may find a 
vety profitable season beginning in Sep- 
tember on the one-night stands. But tne 
so-called big ^ows presented by number 
two and three companies, wiAout stars and 
members of an original cast which demand 
the same scale of prices for admission 
as the original New York company have 
little hope of clearing the "faigli grass" 
towns with any considerable amount of 
profit. 

According to a well-lmown booker of 
one-night stands, the old showman who has 
been operating the theatres in these towns 
has disappeared. New theatres have taken 
the place of the old Opera Houses in 
these towns; also a new type and land of 
manager has sprung up with the new 
theatres. 

These managers operate their houses 
with a policy of playing vaudeyille and 
motion-picture attractions an4 booking a 
road show occasionally. As a rule, a good 
many of these managers play a road at- 
traction once a week and some once in 
two weeks. For the road shows they set 
aside either a Monday, Wednesday or 
Thursday, which generally are found most 
unprofitable for vaudeville and motion pic- 
tures, with the traveling attraction being 
expected to turn the tide and make the day 
a profitable one for the house. In some 
sections of the country, where Saturday is 
the general pay day, it is almost impossible 
to get a Saturday date for a traveling at- 
traction, as the managers calculate that the 
people will patronize any sort of amuse- 
, ment on that day without the theatre being 
compelled to give up a greater part of its 
receipts to the attraction. Then, again, in 
other parts of the country, where there are 
only one or two pay days a month, or 
where the pay day falls on a different day 
than Satunlay, it is most easy to obtain 
Saturday playdatcs, but the business on 
that day of the week is no more, as a rule, 
for the attraction, than on any other or- 
dinary play date of the week which might 
have bren selected. 

In one section of the country, particu- 
larly, Saturday is the only play date that 
is placed at the disposal of the bookers 
for these theatres in New York. These 
bookers, of course, figuring transportation, 
attempt to route their ^ows, with the 
shortest jump possible for six or seven con- 
secutive days a week. In some sections they 



have found this almost impossible, due to 
the fact that only this one day was open. 
As a result, attractions have ' been com- 
pelled to make long jumps around a drde 
so as to be able to cover a territory and 
get all the good Saturday play dates. 

Then again these bouses, especially in 
the smaller of the one-night stand towns, 
have been building up a patronage with 
their vaudeville and motion-picture pro- 
grams by charging a nominal admission 
fee. Therefore, when the so-called "big 
shows" presented by second and third com- 
panies, come to the towns and ask a $2.50 
and $3 top and> in some instances musical 
shows call for a $3.50 top^ with the per- 
centage calling for 75 to 85 per cent to 
the show, the theatre does not do a capa- 
city business, and in most instances plays 
to a loss, with the attraction probably get- 
ting away to a profit. Then again the op- 
erating expense of these houses is three 
times as much as it wai prior to the war, 
as stage hands and musicians* wa^es have 
increased and newspaper advertising is 
much heavier than it was several years 
ago. 

During the past season the New York 
bookers have contracts returned to them 
for so-called bK shows due to the fact 
that the terms ofthe scale would not allow 
the theatre to cpcrate at a profit. 

The one-night managers also set forth 
the contention that whenever a road show 
came to their town and charged more than 
a nominal sum the business for their thea- 
tre's regular business of vaudeville and 
motion pictures suffered considerably, as 
the people had saved up and spent all of 
their luxury or amusement money on one 
attraction and were foregoing the theatre 
for the time being. These attractions, the 
managers held, were more harmful than 
helpful and the returns for them, they as- 
sert, never warranted their being played. 

However, this coming season the book- 
ing offices are attempting to avoid any con- 
flict on the one-night stands and are book- 
ing attractions which will play at a $1.50 
and $2 top and that arc willing to take an 
average from 65 per cent to 70 per -ent of 
the gross, without putting the manager to 
the expense of hiring extra stage hands 
and musicians, in which case, no matter 
how large the gross played to might be, 
the theatre would probably play the show 
at a loss or break even at the best. 



EQUITY STOPS BARON SHOW 

Hcniy Baron's proposed production of 
"My Aunt From Ypsilanti" suspended 
activities last Friday, when Baron had 
failed to satisfy the Equity as to his finan- 
cial responsibility for the production. The 

giece had_ been in rehearsal a week. 
Aaron's failure to post a bond protecting 
the members of the cast prompted the 
Equity to step in and stop the rdiearsals. 
Should Baron iron out the difficulties, re- 
hearsals will be resumed. 

Baron was responsible for the production 
of "The Red Poppy", which stranded on 
Broadway several months ago, owing sev- 
eral weeks' salary to membo-s of the cast 
A combat with the backers, who walked 
out of the show, was given as the cause 
of its financial embarrassment tnr Baron. 
The Equity legal department having a 
number of _ claims against "The Red 
Poppy" preci(ritated their insistence upon a 
bond covering two weeks salary for the 
cast being posted with them before they 
would allow the piece to go into rehearsal. 

Baron consulted with the Equity officials 
and convinced them that co-operation with 
him on the newer piece would, providing 
that show hit, expedite the liquidation of 
the outstanding claims. Upon Baron's 
word that the bond would be posted last 
Friday, he was permitted to go into re- 
hearsal early in the week. When the bond 
failed to materialize. Equity stepped in. 



"DOPE" TO BE MADE INTO PLAY 

"Dope" the vaudeville sketch in which 
Herman Lieb appeared in for many years 
on the Keith and other circuits has been 
enlarged imo a three act play by Lieb 
and Joseph MediU Palerson, 'pubKisher 
of the Chicago Tribune. Negotiations 
are now pending between Lieb and Will 
Page, for the latter to produce the 
play this spring. 



HERK BEFORE REFEREE 



I. H. Herk, was examined before 
Referee in Bankruptcy Seamon Miller, 
last week, the hearing '-^ing short, and 
now closed until Herk files his schedule 
in bankruptcy, sometime within the next 
few days. 

After Herk files the schedule in bank- 
ruptcy a meeting of the creditors will be 
held. Kendler & Goldstein represented 
Herk and Attorney Serling appeared for 
Referee Miller. 



AM. BURLESQUE ASSN. BANiCRUPT 

Judge Learned Hand, of the United 
States District Court, who several weeks 
ago dismissed a petition declaring the 
American Burlesque Association, Inc., of 
701 Seventh avenue, bankrupt, last week 
reversed the decision and graoted the peti- 
tion made by the Carey Show Print Ccnn- 
pany, Charles J. Maher and the Columbia 
Amusement Company to declare the Gr- 
cuit a bankrupt. 

Judge Hand decided to reverse his de- 
cision after Olcott, Gruber, McManus and 
Ernst, attorneys for the petitionen, set 
forth certain facts which the Court felt 
would warrant placing the A. B. A. in 
bankruptcy. 

In the petition set forth by the three 
creditors, the claims of the Carey Show 
Print Company and of Maher were nomi- 
nal, while that of the Colun^ia AmusL- 
ment Company was for $49,000, due on a 
promisso^ note. 

Peter B. Olney, referee in bankruptcy, 
was appointed by Jud^e Hand to take 
charge of the hearings in the matter and 
report his findings to the Court. Meyer 
and Goldsmith, -attorneys for the A. B. A., 
were instructed to file a schedule within 
three weeks, when the hearings in the mat- 
ter will begin. 

The first witness to be summoned to at- 
tend the hearing will be Izzy H. Herk, 
formerly president of the A. B. A., and 
recently head of the defunct Affiliated 
Theatre Corporation. 



FARRAR'S MAID SUES 

Gcraldine Farrar was made defendant 
in a $5,000 damage suit instituted today 
by Ella Swanson, formerly a maid in the 
opera star's home. Miss Swanson charged 
her eyes had become infected from 
towels Miss Farrar used in bathing her 
Pekinese dogs. The singer entered a gen- 
eral denial. 



BROKAW JUDGEMENT REVERSED 

The judgment for $1,442.00 which Ben- 
jamin D. Berg, theatrical manager, ob- 
tained against George T. Brokaw, was 
reversed last Friday by the Appelate 
Division, which held that the latter was ' 
justified in dismissing Berg as general 
manager of the enterprise "Just Because." 

Mr. Berg, .said that he had been en- 
gaged by Brokaw as general manager 
with complete jurisdiction over the show, 
and wrote a letter to Brokaw in which 
he resented what he called the interfer- 
ence of the financial man of the project 
By engaging the chorus, said Mr. Berg 
in his letter, Mr. Brokaw had violated 
his contract, with him. 

When Berg was dismissed he filed suit 
for salary due and obtained a judgment. 
Brokaw claimed that Berg had tiireatoied 
to wreck the show and see_ to it that it 
went to the storehouse without regard 
for the number of people employed in it. 

"The evidence discloses rank in-subor- 
dination and disloyalty," said the Appellate 
Divbion, "which constitutes dear justi- 
fication to defendant for terminating 
plaitifTs contract of employment." 

A. E. A. ROAD ACTORS TO MEET 

Actors engaged in the so-called "pop- 
ular- priced attractions" playing at a 
dollar top, most of whom have heen 
booked out of Chicago will be assembled 
by the Actors' Equity Associatkm for a 
special meeting in that city early next 
month, to discuss CMiditions of their 
work and contracts. 

Players who arc not in touch with the 
Equity and who are on the membership 
list are urged to keep in touch with the 
Oiicago office for further details con- 
cerning this meeting. 

LEDERER TO DO "SUZETTE" 
George Lederer has decided to hold his 
musical comedjr, "Peaches" over until the 
autumn, and is now concerning himself 
with the ivoduction of a new musical com- 
edy, "Suzette". with book and lyrics by 
Charles Nordlinger and music by_ Charles 
Gilpin. The auSiors are also said to be 
financially interested in the productioiL 
Gilpin has been writing the scores for the 
Mask and Wig shows, given by the stu- 
dents of the University of Pennsylvania. 
His latest work is "Here's Howe", which 
ran last week at the Forrest Theatre. 
Philadelphia. 

WINTER STOCK TO CLOSE 

Patbison, N. J., April 6. — ^The Char- 
lotte Winters' Stock Company closed a 
two years' engagement at the Lyceum^ this 
city, April 1. A number of Broadway at- 
tractions have been booked at the house 
for the Spring. 



PHILA. SHOWS DOING BETIER 

PKiuuiELfaiA, April 9. — Business took 
on a new lease of life last week, with 
several grossing high and others gettmg 
a fair share of patronage. The prize 
takings of the week were rolled up by 
the Mask and Wig show, "Here's Howe,* 
which ran for the week at the Forrest 
The latter house has booked a motion 
picture feature, "Hunting Big Game In 
Africa" for a limited engagement, after 
which it will resume its policy as a legit 
house. 

The Shubcrt Theatre, which has been 
dark for several weeks, bids fair to re- 
main out of the running until April 16tli, 
when the fourth annual edition of "Gr een - 
wich Village Follies," Vill relight the 
house. 

"Spice of 1922," which has been here 
on two previous visits, returned to the 
Chestnut Street Opera House tou'glit. 
This had been the local Shubert vaude- 
ville house, but the collapse of that , cir- 
cuit has thrown it back into the tanks 
of a legit house.. . 

"The Mountebank" is in its second and 
final week at the Broad, with The 
Changelings" following in next Monday. 
The latter piece will be presented wiui 
an all-star cast including Henry Miller, 
Blanche Bates and Ruth Chatterton. 

"The Monster" will also depart at the 
end of the week from the Walnut, to 
make way for Fiske O'Hara in "The 
Land of Romance." 

"Captain Applejadc" has entered tipon 
its final two weeks at the Garridc^ while 
"Blossom TioK" is alo neanng the end of 
a phenomena] run at the Lyric ."The 
Cat and the Canary" has entered ° upon 
its eleventh week at the AdeliU and 
continnes to maintain a pace that is 
profitable. 

HUMAN FLY ACTS TO BE BARREED 

As a result of the many ' deaths due to 
"human fly" exhibitions William T. Col- 
lins, alderman, has introduced before the 
city board an ordinance prohibiting aD 
such exhibitions in New York. The 
proposed ordinance reads as follows: 

"Section 22. ' Street shows : 

"Ho fersoH shall give any eskOnlion 
of climbing or scaling on the front or 
exterior of any house, building or 
structure, nor shall any person .-from any 
window or open space of anv house, 
building or structure exhibit to tne poblie 
upon the street or the sidewalk thereof 
any performance or puppet or other fig- 
ure, ballet or other dandng comedy, 
farce, show, play or other eotertaln- 
ment 

"Section n. This ordinance shall take 
effect immediately." 

Alderman Collins made this statement 
regarding h. 

"Out citizens were horrified in March 
last by the tmfortunate death of Harry 
F.- (Spider) Young while in the act of 
climbing the walls of the Hotel Mar- 
tinique. Thousands are reported to have 
witnessed his fall from the tenth floor. 
Thousands more are reported to have 
seen his -mangled body. But for die 
police, no doubt, others than Young 
wonid have heen killed." 



"SUN SHOWERS" PRODUCERS SUQ> 

The aftermath of the ill fated musical 
show "Sun Showers," apjieared last wedc 
in the form of three suits filed in the 
Third District Munldpal Court against 
Harry Delf Productions Inc., in one case 
and in two other cases Lew Cantor and 
Harry Delf, are made defendants. The 
suits total $1,611.50. 

Skanks Boot Shop is sning the Haitr 
Delf Productions Inc, seeking to recover 
the sum of $274.00 due for dandng slip- 
pers. Allyn King, prima-doraia of the 
show, is sning Lew Camor and Harry 
Delf as guarantors, for balance of salary 
due for the final week the show played, 
$337.50 being asked for as the salary dne^ 
less the 25 per cent, cut agreed UpOlL 
Douglass Stevenson, juvenile in the cast, 
is suing Hany Ddf and Lew Cantor for 
salary also, five weeks pay being due 
Stevenson for the five weeks cnd"ng 
March 17(h, totalling $1,000.00. 



6 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 11, 1923 



AMUSEMENT STOCKS STIU QUIET 
WITH PRI CE DROP IN NEARLY ALL 

Loew Report ^ows Operating Ptofit Over Last Year— rFamous 
Player* Gains a Point on Wedc — Orpheum Sets New 
Low for Year But Picks Up 



Tfae market for the amusement securi- 
ties last week contiiioed to be considerably 
off. ' Tnie, two of the issues showed a gain, 
but these were around low marlg, so that 
the gain was nrther apparent tfaaa real and 
dtte ostensiUy- to short coverui^ on Satur- 
day. AU of the stocks are depressed with 
O i'pli e tmi flirting with new low levels. This 
issne marked a new low for the year last 
week, when it readied I7yi, bnt, in sirite of 
this, it showed a gain for the wedc The 
financial market in general cootinoes heavy, 
in spite of the report of the return to pros- 
penty, and Secretary Melton's advocacy of 
a 25 per cent reductiob in the surtax. This 

Senerial market condition is undoubteiUy re- 
ected in the amusement securities. Trad- . 
mg in all the issues seems to be in the 
hands of the professionals, wdo are marking 
time awaiting the Spring rise. The bears 
are in power and are sta^^ng almost daily 
raids in order to meH their ends, but inside 
pools in the amusement issues in most in- 
stances start operations when their pets 
reach a certain point, which, with the shorts 
covering, prevents any marked slide. 

Famous Players showed a gain of one 
point for tbe week. The regular quarterly 
dividend of $2 a share on the preferred 
iitock will be paid on May 1 to stockholders 
of record on April 16, ami this possibly bad 
some effect on the common. Famous 
opened the wedc at 8Byi and at one time 
went as low as 85^, which is dangerously 
near its k>w for the year. It did not stay 
at this point long, however. Professional 
traders and interested parties promptly bol- 
stered up the issne, ^id investors, taking 
advantage of the low in order to get' a 
greater yield, sent the price back to 89^, 
near its normal point During the week 
20,300 shares changed hands. On Monday 
of this' week tfae stock moved downward to 
8S^, showing a loss of three-fourths of a 
inint for the day. One thousand and eight 



hundred shares -were sold on that day. 

Goklwyn did a few flipflaps during the 
wedc This issue was recently at a new 
high for the year, following the announce- 
TDcnt of the Cosmopolitan deal, but when 
the profit and loss account was published 
last week it showed a deficit and a decline 
was predicted. This set in last week and 
the stock closed on Saturday at 5^, or H 
off for the week, with 7,000 shares traded. 
On Monday of Ais week,' insiders, taking 
advantage of the low price and impressed 
with what they consider tfae brigfat future 
of the issue, ran the price up to 6yi, buyii^ 
5,700 shares, a fair day's trading for this 
issue. This is a gain of three-fourths of a 
point 

iLoew's was another issue to show a de- 
cline for the week, at one time going as low 
as 19 and closing at \9'A or 'A off from its 
opening on Monday. During the week 6,- 
600 shares were sold. On Monday of this 
week only one transaction was registered 
and that at 19Mi. H off from its Satnrda/s 
closmg. This transaction showed one small 
block of 100 shares, which means that noth- 
ing of interest is stirring in this security, 
this indifference accounting for the decline. 

Orpheum, misbehaving in great style, set 
. a new low for the year, but, nevertheless, 
showed a' gain of 1^ points for the wedc. 
The issue opened at 18^ and declined to 
17^, the new low, rallying there and mov- 
ing majestically back and up to 19^, clos- 
ing at 19H. with 7,100 shares traded. 
Strangely enough, no transactions were 
registered in this issue on Monday. 

On Tuesday morning, Loew's reported a 
net operating profit from its own and sub- 
sidiary companies from September 1 to 
March 11 of $1,556,554, compared with 
$1,149501 in the corresponding period a 
year ago. This will undoubtedly effect the 
price of this security during the rest of the 
week. 



MOSCOW PLAYERS CLOSE MAY 19 

The Moscow Art Theatre Company will 
conclude their tour of America in Boston 
on May 19. On May 23 the entire com- 
pany will San from that port for England 
to return to Russia. 

The Oiauve Soaris company which will 
conclude a run of fifteen months at tfae 
Century Roof Theatre on April- 28, are 
scheduled to sail for Paris early in May. 
They will appear there during the summer 
montibs and return to America early in 
October, when they will begin a tour of 
the United States, opening in Boston and 
playing all of the larger cities to the Pa- 
cific Coast 



$273,000 m GUILD DRIVE 

Reports of the forty-one captains head- 
ing an equal number of team selling bonds 
in the Theatre Guild's drive for funds for 
a new theatre, indicated that their bond 
sales reached a total of $273,000 for the 
period ending last week. 

Otto H. Kahn, one of the Guild's execu- 
tn-e comittee declared that the purchase of 
bonds for tfae Theatre Guild's new home 
was not a risk but a safe investment 
America has all of the raw materials for 
the development of artists he said, and the 
Guild plays an important part in their de- 
velopment. 



ALL GIRL SHOW FOR CAPITOL 

Chicago, April 7. — An all-girl show will 
be held at the Capitol Theatre, Jackson. 
Midb., Stmday, Monday, Tuesday and 
Wednesday, April & 9. 10 and 11, which 
is headed by Ethel Gilmore and her danc- 
ing ballet, and indudes Ada Weber, "Aris- 
tocrat of Syncopation": Winifrede & Lu- 
cille, Cherie and the Four Ushers, who 
are playing a return date at that theatre. 



"MARELU" OPENS ON APRIL 23 

Emma Dunn will appear in "Marclli" 
a comedy drama by Ann Nichols under the 
management of Miss Nicholas next season. 
The play will have a tryout April 23rd by 
the Henry Duffy players at the Academy 
of Music, Baltimore with Miss Dunn ap- 
pearing in the title role. The regular pro- 
duction for a New York engagement will 
be made in August Miss Dunn appi-arcd 
in "Her Happiness," a comedy drama pro- 
duced by George M. Gatts, this season 
which failed to come into New York for a 
presentation. 



PRESS AGENT NOTICES BARRED 

Press agent notices and matter are no 
longer to be printed in the New York 
American or Evening Journal. In the fu- 
ture all matters pertaining to the theatre 
are to be liandled by feature writers of 
the newspapers and to be written by them. 
Press agents will be privileged to submit 
ideas for stories, but they will only be writ- 
ten by the staffs of the two papers. 



CASTING CARRILO SHOW 

"Kunnel Blake" is the title which -Alex 
E. Aarons has selected for the comedy 
drama which Booth Tarkington has 
written as a slarrinjr vehicle -for I.eo 
Carrilo. The show will ro into rehearsal 
early next week with Malcomb William? 
and Elizabeth Paterson already engngrd 
to appear in support of Carrilo. 



BELASCO BACK IN LAMBS 

David Belasco. who gave no his mem- 
bership of more than twenty-five years in 
the Lamb's Oub. during the actors' strike 
of 1919. resumed his membership in the 
organization as a result of the request of 
the majority of the members of the club. 



BOSTOtf SHOWS DO BUT UTTLE 

Boston, April 9. — The theatrical map re- 
mains unchanged for the current week. 
The running attractions have not recovered 
from the Lenten depression, even last week 
showing no material tiltling !n the takings. 
Several shows will wind up their runs at 
the end of the week and proceed to fields 
anew. 

"The Greenwich Village Follies," which 
has been doing the banner business here 
for the past three weeks, will wind up its 
limited engagement at the Shubert on Sat- 
urday night, to be followed in by Al Jolson 
in "Bombo." 

"The Merry Widow" will vacate the 
Colonial at the end of the week in order 
to give the Bostonians their initial glimpse 
of Mitzi in her new musical play, "Minnie 
and Me." 

"Shuffle Along" will also depart from the 
Arlington this week, with nothing billed 
to go in. A booking may be arranged for 
the house during the week. 

'*Just Married," which has had quite a 
successful run, will depart from the Ply- 
mouth in two weeks. 

"The Fool" is getting a stroiig plajr of 
patronage at the Selwyn, while "Lightnin' " 
continues to hypnotize the dollars into the 
box office at the HoUis.- "Six Cylinder 
Love" remains at the Tremont indefinitely. 



THE CHANGELINGS' OPENS APR. 16 

"The Changelings," by Lee Wilson 
Dodd, will be produced by Henry Miller 
in Philadelphia on April 16. After play- 
ing a short engagement there it will open 
during the Summer at the Columbia The- 
atre in San Francisco as the first of a 
scries of plays which Mr. .Miller will pro- 
duce there. Supporting Mr. Miller will 
be Blanche Bates, Ruth Chatterton. Laura 
Hope Crews, John Miltcm, Felix Krcmbs, 
Geoffrey Kerr and Elmer Brown. 



DAVIS PLAY FOR GRACE GEORGE 

William A. Brady completed negotiations 
last week to have Owen Davis write a play 
for Grace George to star in next season. 
Miss George appeared this season in "To 
Love," which played at the Bijou Theatre 
and then went to the Playhouse, Chicago, 
for a short period and closed. Miss George 
is still sojourning in Palm Beach where she 
went after the closing of "To Love" in 
Chicago. 




THE VAMP & THE PERFECT FOOL 
Directioii AL STRIKER now playins the 

Keith Time 
JACK CONROY MARY BAKER 

IN 

Fourteen rounds of action an4 laughter with a 
knock-out at tfae finish. Aadiencen declare us 
the winner and 7ell for more punishment. 



HILL TO HAVE 16 SHOWS 

Gus Hill next season will send sixteen 
attractions on tour over the one-night and 
week stands, which will be the largest num- 
ber of attractions that this producer has 
sent on tour in one season. Early in July 
rehearsals will begin for ten of the shows, 
which will go on tour during August and 
early in September. In September six 
more shows will begin rehearsal and will 
go on tour early in October. 

The first of the shows to be sent out 
will be four "Bringing Up Father" com- 
panies, which will open during August. 
Then three "Mutt and Jeff" and three 
"Katzenjammer Kid" companies will be 
readied to go out early in September. The 
October contingent of attractions will in- 
clude two "Boob McNutt" companies, two 
"Abie the Agent" companies and two 
"Keeping Up with the Joneses" companies. 



FRIARS' FKOUC A CLEVER SHOW 

The Friars' Spring Frolic given in the 
clubhouse on Sunday night under the di- 
rection of Leo Stark was a bi^ and clever 
show keenly enjoyed by a big crowd of 
Friars and their friends that crowded the 
bighall. 

Tfae show, in the nature of a vaudeville 
bill, with four well-written and excellently 
played sketches, four single entertainers, 
George M. Cohan and Willie Collier in 
their "Together .^gain" bit, the Muskow- 
itcfa Quartette, Juan De La Cruz, bari- 
tone, Lionel Atwill, who did a scene from 
"Dcbarau," his play of last jfcar, and Syd- 
ney Jarvis, who sang the Friars song with 
all the bigness and clarity of voice he dis- 
played in the old days of the "Frolics." 
Cohan was a hit of great proportions, and 
sang and danced with style, enthusiasm 
and evident pleasure. 



ZETTERION THEATER OPENS 

New Bedford, Mass., April' 9.— The Zei- 
terion Theatre, a new vaudeville and mo- 
tion-picture theatre, seating 2,700, owned 
and operated by Henry Zeitz, opened itst 
doors last week. The opening attraction 
was George Jcssel's "Troubles of 1922," 
who played the entire week. At the con- 
clusion of their engagement here the com- 
pany closed their tour of thirty-three weeks 
which began on the Shubert Unit Vaude- 
ville Circuit last September. Jessel and the 
Courtney Sisters intend playing vaudeville 
dates during the summer. 



SHEA'S "CHIVALRY" DELAYED 

Jos. E. Shea is encountering numerous 
<liniculties in preparing '"Chivalry," a play 
bj- William J. Hurlbut and starrine Irene 
Fcnwick, in rehearsal due to the fact he 
has no leading man to play opposite the 
star. Arthur Byron was scheduled to play 
the role, but at the last minute word was 
received that he had another engagement 
••Chivalry" is slated to open in Atlantic 
City on May 7. 



"THUMBS DOWN" REOPENING 

Charles Wanamaker, the Philadelphia 
theatre manager who recently produced 
"Thumbs Down" a play by Myron Fagan 
for a tryout has closed the company and 
will begin recasting it shortly for a Sum- 
mer engagement at the Chestnut Street 
Opera House. Philadelphia. Sue Mc- 
Manany has been engaged for the prin- 
cipal role. 



NEW HAMMERSTEIN SHOW 

.Arthur Hammerstein will place "Lily, 
of the Valley," a musical play by William 
Carey Duncan, in rehearsal on July 26. 
and open the play in New York at the 
Casino Theatre early in September. Hal 
Skelly will_ be featured in the production 
with the ingenue role being played by 
Lorraine Manville.' Dave Bennett will 
arrange the dance and ensemble numbers. 



GERTRUDE HOFFMAN AT MARIGOLD 

Chicago, Aprn ^. — Ernie Young has en- 
gaged Gertrude Hoffman and her entire 
company lor the Marigold's Gardens be- 
cinning tonight. An added attraction will 
be De Haven and Nice in their vaudeville 
offering, plus some new comedy numbers 
put on for ,the occasion. 



April 11, 1923 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



7 



MUSICIANS' UNIONS ARE NEARING 
PEACE AFT ER MANY C ONFERENCES 

Committee Representing M. M. P. U. and American Federation 
of Musicians Meet and Sedc to Settle Diffoences — ^If Con> 
forence Fail* Strike Vote Will Be Taken This Morning 



JESSIE BONSTCLLE GETS H. O. H. MISSING MANAGER LEGALLY ALIVE 



The peace dove hovered on the horizon 
late yesterday (Tuesdajr) for the end of 
the strife that has ' existed between the 
the American Federation of Musidans. 
After several conferences on Monday that 
lasted until early Tuesday morning, it was 
agreed that at noon Tuesday conunittees 
representing the M. M. P. U. and the 
American Federation of Musicians should 
meet in the o£Bce of Nicholas M. Schenck, 
general manager of the Loew Circuit, and 
discuss the terms of settlement of the 
trouble. The M. M. P. U. was repre- 
sented at this meeting by F. Paul Vac- 
carelli, its business agent, and Andwny 
P. MulierL The A F. of M. was repre- 
sented by a committee headed by Joseph 
N. Weber, International president of the 
organization, and Wm. G. Kemgood, In- 
ternational treasurer of the body. 

The mean difficulty to iron out for the 
joint bodies was the matter of the incor- 
poration of the M. M. P. U. as a holding 
company and die question of the status of 
Local 802, the body which took the place 
of 310, the M. M P. U. organization, when 
it was outlawed. The M- M. P. U. men 
held oiit that thqr were willing to join 
hands with 802 in any feasible manner 
which would warrant the local having its 
own autonomy, so that it could elect its 
own officers and be permitted to arrange 
and enforce its own wage scale, without 
the National officers being called in to de- 
dde what was to be done and how it was 
to be done. 

They also insisted that the members of 
. No. 310 who were prevented from going 
to work at the Playhouse after Vaccarelli 
had been informed they would be per- 
mitted to return would be taken care of 
and accepted into the local in good stand- 
ing and be permitted to return to their 
work. They also requested that no dis- 
crimination should be used against any 
members of Local 310 who were active 
in tiie difficulties which existed between 
the two organizations. 

The A. F. of M. grouv held that this 
was no time for any organization to breach 
the contract which is in existence between 
the various bodies of theatre managers 
and the A. F. of M. and local 802. Weber 
said this contract was inviolable and that 
he felt that 310 knowing this fact_ should 
not have started any trouble during the 
existence of the contract, as it would only 
place the entire craft of musicians in a 
bad light with the managers. 

There were also various details that 
were to be ironed out, with hoth sides 
a bit reluctant about making concessions. 

At the time the conference started Mr. 
Schenck said that he felt that something 
would be done on way or another, or 



otherwise he woald wash his hands of Ae 
matter and make public the various phases 
of it. He said that Vaccarelli, who repre- 
sented the M. M. P. U. in. the numerous 
conferences with him, expressed every 
hope of the breach being patched and fae 
felt that after the two committees had 
discussed the subject thoroughly they 
would come to an amicable understand- 
ing. In case they did not he said he 
would not endeavor to go any further to 
establish peace with the two camps as 
he had tidiansted all of his resources. 

Monday afternoon and evening there 
were conferences in Mr. Schcnck's offices 
which lasted three to four hours each. 
Vaccarelli was in one room while Weber 
and Kemgood were in another room of 
Mr. Schenck's suite of offices. Schenck 
would confer with one party and then an- 
other, without either party meeting the 
other face to face. The general situation 
was gone over at the afternoon sessions 
and resumed at the evening session. 
Messrs. Weber and Kemgood left the 
evening session at II P. M., and stated 
that no headway had been made, when 
they were recalled to the office of Schenck. 
They returned there again and after sev- 
eral hours' discussion left when it is said 
they reached the understanding to meet 
Vaccarelli and Mulieri with their com- 
mittee Tuesday noon. When they left the 
meeting they, however, refused to give 
any intimation of what had been accom- 
plished. 

The members of die M. M. P. U. were 
anxiously awaiting the decision of the 
committees as their regular meeting 
started at midnight (Tuesday)- and in 
case there had been no headway made they 
were prepared to demand that Vaccarelli 
call a strike to become effective today. 

All of last week the members of the 
M. M. P. U. had a turbulent time at the 
Playhouse in 48th street. The men had 
been called out there early in the week 
and were then ordered back that night, 
subsequently they were called out and 
when told to go back found that the mem- 
bers of 802. and the stage hands refused 
to work with them. They were replaced 
by other members of 80^. William A. 
Brady, who operates the Playhouse, after 
several of these experiences, announced 
that he was tired of this way of doing 
business and that he would take_ action 
against those responsible for an inferior 
class of musicians being placed in the the- 
atre. There were also difficulties at the 
Astor Theatre and the Capitol Theatre, 
but they were all straightened out with 
the men going back to work. This was 
also the case a( the Criterion, where the 
men struck ten days ago. 



Jessie Bonstelle has secured the Har- 
lem Opera House where she will in- 
stall her repertory company to present 
new plays at a $1 top srale in opposition 
to the plan of Cfaanning Pollock and the 
Selwyns to turn the Apollo theatre into 
a similar enterprise. 

According to William A. Brady, the 
stock company is a 'laboratory," for the 
New York producer and he says that he 
aitd several leading producers will co- 
operate with Miss Bonstelle in having her 
tr^ out plays for them at her theatre 
prior to their being given a regular pro- 
duction. According to Brady, Miss Bon- 
stelle, in case she can get a theatre with 
sufficient capacity to warrant operating 
at a ^ top will begin operations this 
spring. 

Brady says that it was through the 
stock company production of Arthur 
Wing Pinero's play "The Endianted Cot- 
tage^ that he produced the play at the 
Ritz Theatre last week. 

.Besides prododng new plays at the 
stock theatre. Miss Boostelle intends to 
include in the repertory classics and re- 
vivals of the best of the old favorite 
Broadway plays. 

Her company will open early in May. 



TWO GEORGE KELLY SHOWS 

Stewart and French will produce two 
plays by George Kelly, author of "The 
Torchbearers" next season. The first will 
be a drama, entitled, "No Man's Wife," 
and the second a three-act comedy, "The 
Show Off." This latter play is an enlarged 
version of a vaudeville sketch which Kelly 

?iroduccd under the same title. Rehearsals 
or "N'o Slan's Wife" will ■begin late in 
July. 



"MISSION MARY" GOING OUT 

Al. H. Woods will place in rehearsal next 
week "Mission Mary," a play by Ethel- 
bert Hales, which he took over from 
George M. Cohan recently. The original 
title of the play was "The Mission." 
Woods expects to present the production 
in New York early in May. 

Gladvs Frazier now appearing with 
The Masked Woman" on tour will be 
cast for the principal role. 



"GOODNESS KNOWS'" OPENING 

Charles Frohman, Inc., will present 
"Goodness Know.s." a play by David Gray 
at the Nixon Theatre, Pittsburgh, next 
Monday night. It is the intention of Gil- 
bert Miller of the Frohman office to have 
this plav in rca-fincss to come into the Em- 
pire Theatre, New York, in case Alice 
Brady, who opened in "Zander" at the Em- 
pire on Monday night fails to catch on. In 
case the Brady show hits, "Goodness 
Knows" will be shelved for a fall nroduc- 
tion. The cast of "Goodness Knows," 
which is being staged by Bertram Harrison 
consists of: Charles Richmond, Juliet 
Crosby. Gavin Muir, Goeffrcy Millar, Ade- 
laide Prince, George Graham, IHorence 
Johns, Charles Adams, and Fred Nichols. 



GETS SHUBERT-GARRICK 

Washincion, D. C April 9. — George 
Marshall, took over the management to- 
day of the Shubert-Garridc theatre, open- 
ing with "Getting Gertie's ' Garter," which 
he is presenting with the George Marshall 
Comedians. The house was for a num- 
ber of years under the management of 
H. Stoddard Taylor and until recently 
leased to the Garry McGarry Stodc- 
' placers. 

George Marshall, also controls the 
Shubert-Belasco theatre where another 
Avery Hopwood iarce, "The Demi Vir- 
gin" with Hazel I^wn is playing in its 
second month. "Getting Gertie's Garter" 
is booked at its present house indefinitely. 



"ADRIANNE" REHEAKSING 

Louis Werbe will place "Adrianne," a 
new musical comedy that went into re- 
hearsal Monday at the New Amsterdam 
Theatre. Billy B. Van has been cast for 
the leading role with Vivienne Segal listed 
to head the feminine contingent of the 
production. Edgar McGregor will stage 
the book and Dave Bennett the numbers 
of the show, which is scheduled for a 
summer engagement at a Broadway the- 
atre. The piece will open in Washington 
on May 14. 

"BAMBOO TREE" OPENS APRIL 23 

"Under the Bamboo Tree^" formerly 
the starring vehicle of the late Bert Wil- 
liams, in which he appeared last year at 
the Studebaker Theatre, Chicago, which is 
now being produced by the Shuberts, with 
James Barton at the head of the cast, will 
have its premier performance at the Apollo 
Theatre, Atlantic City, on April 23. The 
show will be' brought into New York early 
in May for a summer engagement. 



VIRGINIA'S NIECE ON STAGE 

Virginia Earle, one of the most prom- 
inent Broadway musical comedy stars 
twenty years ago, who is now retired from 
the stage, is bringini; forth Blossom Vrec- 
land, her niece to take her place on the 
stage. Blossom was added to the cast of 
the "Zicgfcld Follies" last Monday, and 
Aunt Virginia is on hand to escort her to 
and from the theatre and isivc her pointers 
on her work at every performance. 



ToBONTo, Can., April 9. — Mrs. Ambrose 
J. Small's application to the Court to have 
her missing husband, gone four and a balf 
years, declared 'legally dead and herself a 
widow, was denied vj_ Judge Coatsworth, 
according to whose opinion Canada's miss- 
ing theatrical Idn^ is still alive. The pe- 
tition to declare Small dead was liotly op- 
posed by his two sisters owing to the deep 
hatred between the three 'women in die 
case. 

Had Smill been declared dead the widow 
would have come into possession of an 
estate valued at over $2,000^000. As mat- 
ters now stand, she will have to wait three 
and a balf yeairs more before the mi«ing 
man is adcoowledged dead legally. W. N. 
Tillcy, attomei' for Mr*. SraalL exhausted 
every means to prove that Small was dead 
and dted precedent for ahortening death 
time required by law. . He asserted that 
any one of several tiiiiifs mi^t be adduced 
from the threat of smcide to his hazardous 
Journeys and trndeitakings. 

On the night of December 2 Ambrose 
J. Small went out Into the night and com* 
pletelv dropped out of sight from that time 
on. When he left he took with him the 
annuities he allowed his sisters. He also 
took with him several checks made oat 
to Mrs. Small— and in the trust comiaqy 
where his funds were kept he had that day 
deposited $1,000X100, the first payment made 
him on his CanaHian theatre string. 
' IMfs. Small did not notify the polke of 
die fact that her husband was missing 
tmtil several weeks had passed. Her ex- 
planation of this delay was that she 
thought her husband had gone off on one 
of his_ many jaunts with other women, and 
she did not want the publidty that would 
result from reporting him missing. On 
these occasions, she said, when her husband 
went off with another woman, he would 
confess his nnfaithfullness and tell her all 
about it. One person was apprised of the 
fact of the disappearance, and this was a 
close friend of Small's, a betting comnBS- 
sioner. named Tom Flytm. Mrs. Small 
quoted Flynn as saying, "Don't be fussy. 
Give the man some lib^ty." As time went 
by and her husband did not return, Mrs. 
Small said she really thought he had eloped 
with a Mrs. Smiui. This woman was 
found by the police to be living in a rity 
in lilinnesota, but not with Mr. Small. 

Many theories of the theatrical man's 
disappearance have been advanced, includ- 
ing murder, but the question of what be- 
came of the body has not been answered. 
One detective made the statement that he 
knew a plot of ground seventy acres square, 
somewhere in which was btuied Ambrose 
J. Small but as yet he has not revealed 
the spot. 

VERA BURT MARRIES "SAXI" 

Jacksonville, Fla, April 9. — ^Vera Burt 
married her vaudeville partner "Saxi" 
Holsworth. who leads the six-piece jazz 
Orchestra in front of whidi Miss Burt 
performs, on the stage of the Palace The- 
' atre. Friday night of last week. The cere- 
mony was performed by County Judge John 
Du Boise, with manager Jesse Clarke and 
others present, indudmg members of the 
bill playing the house. 

Miss Burt is a favorite in thb sccdon 
of the country, having been bom in Tampa, 
twenty-three years ago, and has since ap- 
peared in the vicinity in various acts. 



"MASQUERADER" FOR STOCK 

"Masquerader," Richard Watson TuUy's 
play, which was the best starring vehide of 
Guy Bates Post, has been released for 
stock production. 



"SLAVEMAKER" SHELVED 

Mary Ryan will not tour this season in 
"The Slavemaker." a play by Sam For- 
rest which Sam H. Harris produced out 
of town several months ago as was v 
planned last week. Mr. Harris decided 
that it would be best to shelve "The 
Slavemaker" until early in the fall when 
he will bring it to the Sam H. Harris 
theatre for its New York presentation. 



Saxi Holsworth was arrested on a charge 
of disorderlv conduct three weeks ago whOe 
in Grecneville. N. C, and was relea^d after 
posting bonds to keep the peace. He was 
charged with beating Vera Burt to the 
verge of miconsdonsness in her room of 
the Ottaray Hotel, Holsworth having made 
a trip from his room on the second Boor 
to the fourth where Miss Burt lived. He 
told police officers that he was displeased 
at her conduct and became enraged. And 
now they are one. • — 



EQUITY COMPILING BOOK 

Equity is compiling a booklet for dis- 
tribution among its members. It will 
thoroughly explain the spirit and work of 
the organization. It will also indude in- 
structions, rules and obligations and 
other helpful hints to the performer. 



8 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



Apnl 11, 1923 




EDDIE CANTOR 
SIGNS WITH 
KEITH 

JOLSON REPORTED NEGOTIATING 

Eddie Cantor, Modrt^ti-^ comedian and 
one of tile strongest drawing cards for 
Shnbett jiroductions, will open a tour of 
Keith vaudeville at the Palace Tlieatre, 
in dereland. on June 4th, following: the 
dosiDS of hs present show, "Make It 
Snappy," which . is now tonnng. Cantor 
has been appearing under the Shnbert 
managanent since 1920, previous to that 
having been with Zeigfeld's "Follies" and 
"MidttiBfat FroUc" With the Shoberts, 
it is_ understood that Cantor has been 
woridng on a salary and po'centage basis, 
and averaged from ^ODO to* $2,500 a 
wedc When Cantor played a wedc in 
vaudeville for Ward and Glyime last 
he was reported to have received ^2^00 for 
the weelrs engagement While his sal- 
ary has not been given out by the Keith 
circnit it is understood that Cantor will 
receive a straight salary of $2,500 for 
each wedc be plays. 

a; Jolson, whose contract with the 
Shuberb also expixcs this season, is an- 
other who is said to be dickering with 
the Keith VandeviUe Exchange with the 
purpose of playing the two-a-day houses 
when '^ombo" doses. Jolson opens a 
four week run in Boston in "Bombo," on 
Monday, and is schedaled to retnm to the 
Winter Garden with his production and 
open there on May ISth. It has been 
published that he and Charles Dillingfaani 
have been making arrangements for Jol- 
son to come under Dillingham's manage- 
ment begiiuiiDg next season. The Keith 
vaudeville tour of Jolson. if he does 
oome to terms with the booking oflke, 
would undoubtedly be of but a few 
weeks' duration, between the time "Bombo" 
doses, and the time Jolson begins pre- 
paring bis next season s production. This 
black-&ce star has also been working for 
the Shoberts on a salary and percentage 
of the house receipts tasis. The Kdth 
circnit has as yet never paid an^ artist 
on a percentage basis, all acts bang en- 
gaged for a stated salary. The highest 
ever paid was the late Sarah Bernhardt, 
who received $1,000 in gold every night 
for one week at the Palace, getting $7,000 
a week. Jolson would undoubtedly be 
the one to come nearer to thb amount, 
than any artist in die past in Kdth 
vandeville. Jolson will appear at the 
N. V. A. benefit at the Hip on May 13. 
This gives added strength to the rumor 
that he will be seal in the Kdth houses. 



COLONIAL, ERIE. RE-OPENS 

Kbif. April 9.— The Colonial theatre 
here, booked ont of the Keith Vaudeville 
Exdmnge. which dosed several weeks ago 
because of a "flu" epidemic re-opens to- 
day. The house is changing its policy from 
three performances a day. to two shows a 
day. It win continue to be a full week 
stand as before. 



HeCARTHY SISTERS IN VAUDE. 

The McCarthT Sisters, who closed re- 
cently IB "The Music Box Revue," have 
entered Keith vandeviHe. They opened 
in Toledo on Monday and will be seen 
ia New York within the course of a 
few weeks. 



STOCK FOR KEITH HOUSES 

The advisability of installing stock com- 
panies in the Keith metropolitan theatres 
which generally dose for the Summer, and 
keep them open instead, is now being con- 
sidered by the Kdth ofiice. The Colonial, 
which up to now is scheduled to dose dur- 
ing the week of May 7th, is under spedal 
consideration, for a stock comjsny, as the 
house is near the theatrical district, being 
at Broadway and Sixty-second street, and 
would be the only theatre playing stock 
attractions in diat section. 

Stock was tried at Keith's Alhambra for 
several weeks during the early part of last 
Summer and played to good business in 
its first few weeks. It did not continue 
however, closed in July, being dark until 
September. It is understood, that if stock 
wiU be played at dther house during the 
coming Summer, it will be operated by an 
individual stock company, and not by the 
Kdth circuit, as was done last year. The 
closing date on the Alhambra has not been 
set as yet. 



•TUT* ACT IN HLM HOUSES 

The Egyptian travesty, built around the 
recent discovery of the tomb of Tut-ankh- 
Amen, which Earl Lindsay staged for the 
Edward Small offices, opened out of town 
at one of the Famous Players houses on 
Monday. The Famous Players intends to 
put out a series of these prdudes, none 
running more than fifteen minutes, to use 
in their picture houses throughout the 
country. 

The first Lindsay unit employs six girl 
dancers, one speculty dancer, and three 
singing prindpals. The act is appropri- 
ately set and costumed with spedal scenery 
and illusions bein^ devised by George 
Hanlon. 



SCHENCK MUST PAY $175 A WEEK 

Joe Schenck of the vaudeville team of 
Van and Schenck must, according to the 
ruling of Judge Hay in Spedal Term of 
the Supreme Court of Brooklyn, pay to 
Mrs. Amelia Schenck, his wife,_ $175_ a 
week temporary alimony. She is suing 
the singer for divorce. 

Mrs. Sdienck allies her husband had 
an income of $75,000 a year, and asked 
for $250 a wedc for the support of her- 
self and her young daughter. Schenck 
through his attorneys showed that his in- 
come was less than half of $75,000 a year. 
"The liair have been separated for several 
months. 



BRUCE DUFFUS WITH FEINBERG 

Bruce Duffus, an independent vaudeville 
agent for the past eight years since he 
left the Poll forces as booker, is now as- 
sociated with Abe I. Feinbeis in the book- 
ing of vaudeville flash featnres. 



ZIEGFELD-RASTELU AGREEMENT 

An amicable agreement vvas reached be- 
tween Ftorenz Zeigfeld, Jr., and the Kdth 
circuit last wedc, whereby £jirice Rastelli 
was allowed to open in Kdth vaudeville 
at the Palace theatre on Monday. Zdg- 
fdd had objected to Rastdli's playing 
vaudeville as he claimed the juggler was 
under contract to him to appear in the 
Mary Eaton production. However, ar- 
rangemoits were made between E. F. Albee 
and Zdgfeld which rcsnlted in the latter's 
withdrawing his objections. 

ALBEE STOCK OPENING 

Pbovdence, R. I., April 9. — Vaudeville 
shows will be discontinued at the E. F. 
Albee Theatre Saturday night until next 
Fall, in keeping with the policy of the 
management at this time of the year. 

The 23rd Annual E. F. Albee Stock 
Company's season will start at the theatre 
Monday, April 16. witfi "Little Old New 
York" as tiie first presentation. Vaude- 
ville will be resumed in September. 

LEWIS IN NEW ACT 

Bert Lewis is preparing a new comedy, 
singing and talking act entitled "From 
Dixie to Egypt." by John P. Medbury, in 
which he expects to open shortly on the 
Kdth time. Lewis is well known in West- 
em vaudeville cirdes. 



TWELVE HOUSES 
CLOSING ON 
ORPHEUM 



SPECIAL POUCIES IN FOUR 



The Orpheum drcuit has started to 
dose several of its houses, and in others, 
inaugurate new policies with the intention 
of operating than all summer, returning 
to the big time policy when the new sea- 
sun begins. The first of the big time the- 
atres which are being given special sum- 
mer polides was the Orpheum in Des 
M<nnes, which began playing five acts and 
motion pictures last, week, giving two 
performances a day ior a full week. 
The Orpheum in Kansas City closed on 
Saturday, April 7th, and the Mainstrcet 
in that city, shifted from its Junior 
Orpheum policy to the big time policy on 
Sunday, April 8th. 

The Orpheum, New Orleans, doses 
April 22nd; the Orpheum, Memphis, on 
April ISth; Orpheum, Omaha, on April 
2sth ; the Orpheunv Sioux Gty, on . May 
5th; Winnipeg, on May 5th; Seattle, on 
May 12th; Portland, May 15th; Oak- 
land, on May 26th; Sacramento and 
Fresno, on May 26th; Denver on June 
1st. A summer policy of six acts and 
pictures, three shows a day, goes into the 
Hennepin, Minneapolis, on May 6th. Prior 
to that, on April 29th, the Palace. Mil- 
-waukee, will assume the same policy. The 
Palace, Chicago, will continue to operate 
with its present big time policy through- 
out the summer, from present plans. 

YOUNG AGENCY BARRED 

CiiiCACo, April 7. — The Ernie Young 
Agency has been barred from further 
booking on the floor of the W. V. M. A 
in a notice sent out from the booking office 
Thursday afternoon. The same day, Er- 
nie Young, having returned to Chicago 
from Detroit, sent a letter resigning from 
the floor feeling that he is not devoting 
enough time to vaudeville, because of the 
many revues he is producing. 

There have t>een differences between the 
Ernie Young and the W. V. M A. offices 
for some time and the break was in- 
evitable 

Willie Berger, who was on the floor for 
Ernie Young, will remain with the Young 
agency. 

ALLEN GOING TO EUROPE 

Edgar Allen, general booking manager 
for the Fox vaudeville drcuit, will sail for 
Europe during the first wedc in July. Mrs. 
Allen, known professionally as Katfaerine 
Murray will go with him ih order to re- 
gain her health. Mrs. Allen recently un- 
derwent a very serious operation and is 
now recuperatmg. Wliile abroad, Allen 
will do business for the Fox Film Sttidios. 



FOUR KEITH HOUSES CLOSING 

Fonr Kdth houses booked by James 
Aloz, will conclude their season during the 
last two weeks in May, and one has already 
beoi dosed. The dark house is the one 
in Hamilton, Canada, and the others are 
the Temple, Rochester, which closes at the 
end of the week of May 19lh, Toronto, on 
May 21st. Montreal, week of May 28th, 
and Detroit, the week of May 28th. 

"MOUNTAIN MAN" FOR VAUDE. 

A condensed version of Clare Kum- 
mer's comedy, "The Mountain Man," is 
being prepared for vaudeville. _ The 
producers are negotiating with Sidney 
Blackmar, who was one of the out- 
standing hits of the original production 
to head the cast. Blackmar has been 
appearing with "The Love Child," 
which closed last week. 



FILMS CUT DOWN AiCTS 

Feature motion pictures are being 
used to a greater extent than ever in 
filling out bills in the split week vaude- 
ville houses, particularly on the Moss, 
Proctor and Fox drcuits, which have cut 
down on thdr vaudeville acts in order 
to play certain films. During the last 
half of the current week, all Proctor 
and Moss houses w!U play "Hunting 
Big Game in Africa," which closed re- 
cently after eleven weeks at the Lyric, 
for the feature film. This runs for over 
ninety minutes, and in the Moss and 
Proctor houses, five acts are bdng 
booked for the last half instead of the 
customary six. During the last half of 
last week, most of these houses played 
"Fury" . as their feature attraction, 
which also ran for more than ninety 
minutes, and five acts were booked. 

The Fox houses played to the best 
business of many seasons all last week 
with only three acts of vaudeville each 
half of the week, and "Robin Hood," 
starring Douglas Fairbanks as a full 
week attraction. The Fox theatres have 
repeated this stunt throughout the sea- 
son, having played most of the "super- 
features" for full week stands and cut- 
ting down on vaudeville acts. 

N. V. A. COIMPLAINTS 

Lewis and Dody have filed complaint 
against Al and Murray Howard, claiming 
that the latter team are infringing on thdr 
"Hello, Hdlo, Hello" song . 

Sam Lazar and Josh Dale have com- 
plained against Pierce and Arrow, alleg- 
ing that the latter arc infringing on their 
piece of business consisting of two head- 
lights to represent an automobile, being 
seen in the rear of a darkened stage, then 
coming down to one from full stage, and 
when the lights flash up, two men in black- 
face, carrying lanterns, are discovered. 

Senator Murphy is complaining against 
Speaker Lewis, claiming infringement on 
his monologue. 

Jarvis and Harrison complain that Fuller 
and Burt have again placed the "hold-up" 
bit into their act 

Louise and Andy Barlow complain 
against Hal and Francis, daiming that the 
latter act is infringing on their offering 
in its entirety. 



MORE UNIT SHOW SUITS FILED 

Chas. De Haven. Fred Nice, and Joe 
Towle, as co-partners, filed suit last week 
in the Mtmicipal Court trough their at- 
torney, Kendler & Goldstein, for $1,000 
against Arthur Kldn, the action being for 
salary and damages, the claims having been 
consolidated. 

According to counsel for the trio, Ar- 
thur Klein signed them to appear in his 
Shubert Vaudeville Unit, "Hdlo Every- 
body," as added attractions, Gertrude Hoff- 
mann being starred in the show. 



JACKSON SUCCEEDS BIRD 

Jlen Jackson, who for the past two 
rs has been in the production depart- 
ment of the William Fox West Coast 
Studios, has been appointed general 
business manager for that concern in 
Los An^reles, succeeding Charles Bird, 
who resigned recently. Jackson, jirior 
to going to the coast was manager of 
Fox's Audubon Theatre at 166th Street, 
and Broadway, New York. 

ORPHEUM PRESIDENT IN NEW YORK 

Marcus Heiman, president of the 
Orpheum Circuit, arrived in New York 
last Friday for a series of business 
conferences. 



PROCTOR RETURNS FROM SOUTH 

F. F. Proctor returned this week from 
a two months* sojourn in Florida. With 
him were Mrs. Proctor, two daughters 
and a niece. 



April 11, 1923 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



9 





PALACE 

Nothing out of the ordinary about the 
bill, outside of Hugo Riesenfeld and His 
Rialto and Rivoli Orchestras of 55 mu- 
sicians, who proved to be a popular in- 
novation. Comparatively speaking, the 
orchestra failed to score a hit of any larger 
proportions than at least two ten-piece 
orchestras that have played the house. 
"Bogus ticket" signs flanked the entrance 
to the lobby and two men with magnifying 
glasses scrutinized the tickets at the door. 

Eight Blue Demons, "The Whirling 
Arabians," gave the first half considerable 
momentujn, not always maintained by sub- 
sequent offerin|:s. Their style of acrobatics 
and tumbling is familiar to most theatre- 
goers and allows for a fast finish. 

The "Acromedians" in the second spot, 
Russell and Pierce, did their song and 
dance opening, depotding to great extent 
on the dancing for the success of their act. 
Usually their style of tumbling toward the 
close of their offering puts them across 
strong, but following tne Blue Demons 
took a lot of the ptmdi out of their efforts 
in that direction. 

Melissa Ten Eyck and Max Weily, with 
Max Dolin and Frederick Cromweed, in a 
dance, violin and piano presentation, have 
played the house quite often and their 
work is well known to vaudeville patrons. 
The dances created by Mr. Weily are very 
good, but the piece de resistance "Pirate 
Passion" might 'be exchanged once in a 
while for something else when repeating at 
a house. Excepting that the dances are 
the same as they have been for at least 
three engagements at the house, they are 
pleasing enough and -well executed. Mr. 
Dolin's solos on the violin were good as 
they always have been and Mr. Cromweed 
at the piano proved a capable accompanisL 
'Women monologists are few and far be- 
tween in vaudeville and undoubtedly Trixie 
Friganza is entitled to take her place at 
the head of the few that there are. Doing 
her act "My Little Bag of Tricks," she 
manages to sell it for a solid hit The 
clowning bit at the conclusion of her per- 
formance, done with Max Weily, has ^been 
perfected so that it now is sure-fire and ' 
funny. 

"Broadway's Smart Couple," Florence 
Tempest and Homer Dickinson, with M. 
George Harriss at the piano, were bright 
in spots but for the most part the act all 
but died standing up. Dickinson has a 
. pleasing personality and material of the 
poorest sort. At times Miss Tempest 
seemed to be just passi and at other 
times showed some of her former clever- 
ness. 

The first half was closed by a marvelous 
showman and juggler, Enrico Rastelli, 
"The World's Wonder," who is a revela- 
tion in the art of novelty juggling and 
balancing. Cool throughout the act, un- 
pretentious, and in an apparently simple 
routine he held the house in strict atten- 
tion in a spot held by few jugglers, which 
speaks for itself. For detailed review sec 
under "New Acts." • 

The Runaway Four, opened the second 
half, with their clowning dance, and 
tumbling stunts, scoring their usual hit de- 
spite the fact that they were the third act 
on the bill to depend to great extent on 
their tumbling. 

Hugo Riesenfeld, scheduled for 20 
minutes, did about- 15 minutes more, oblig- 
ing with two or three encors, gather- 
ing up the flowers sent to him and making 
a short speech of appreciation. The or- 
chestra opened with a classical selection, 
followed It with another and then special- 
ized on "Qassical Jazz." (New Acts.) 

In the next to closing spot, Julius 
Tannen, gathered a few laughs with his 
new gags, but did not score as he did in 
the days before he forsook vaudeville for 
the furniture business. 

Helen Higgins and Natalie Bates, with 
Horace Bentley, in "Singdance," closed the 
show in a versatile dance routine, writh Mr. 
Bentley at the piano, and held them fairly 
intact despite the hour. The girls are very 
capable dancers. M. H. S. 



VAUDEVEiE REVIEWS 



RIVERSIDE 

A bill of nine standard acts, of which 
Belle Baker, Morton and Glass and Joe 
Fejer's Orchestra are the high lights, com- 
prised the new bill here last Monday after-, 
noon. The remainder of the show con- 
sisted of the usual diversity of variety en- 
tertainment and seemed to satisfy the di- 
version appetites of a rather slim audience. 

Van Horn and Inez proved worthy pace- 
makers in opening spot with a fast slating 
contribution featuring "six^ whirls a min- 
ute" and an ori^iral swivel neck spin. 
Both are accompkshed skaters, who blend 
with their -work and sell it with a gusto 
that is interest sustaining. 

The Gaits Brothers deuced in their usual 
sure-fire dancing act, scoring -well in solos 
and wowing them in the doubles. An es- 
sence of comedy injected _ by the taller 
brother make their offering the more 
likable, but it is die dandng that carries 
them under the wire at a good price. 

Harry Holmes and Florrie La Vere were 
as pleasing as ever in their novelty skit, 
"Themselves." The offering is subdivided 
into three episodes, the first of which is a 
box in a theatre. The couple ester and 
engage in a comedy argument regarding 
the show and their domestic trials. They 
recognize the opening act of the bill as 
one they have seen so often that they be- 
lieve they could do the act themselves. 
The husband has been imbibing in the "for- 
bidden liquid," becomes tipsy and goes into 
a doze. The wife also falls asleep. The 
scene shifts to "three" with the couple 
proceeding to do the act they were sup- 
posed to see at the theatre. All of the bits 
are very well done. Holmes' comedy bong 
a riot 

Santos and Hayes, who when last seen 
were heading their own production act, 
have shelved that offering for a "two act" 
From a physical standpoint each of the 
girls, are the extreme of the other and most 
of their comedy talk is centered upon this 
situation. Miss Hayes, who has an espec- 
ially pleasing voice, contributes a classic 
solo, while her partner handles a comedy 
number and a "blues" song to perfection. 
Later they join forces for a duet which 
takes them off. The differences of their 
physiques is a stable comedy angle and 
their songs are sufficiently well done to 
warrant a warm hand on any bill. 

Joe Fejer and his famous Hungarian 
Orchestra closed the first half and gave 
the audiences something new in the way of 
"orchestra acts." The seven pieces, aside 
from the piano and cymbalon, arc of the 
stringed variety and the arrangements are 
of a symphonic order. Although classics 
dominate their repertoire, they are handled 
in a way to make them enjoyable for 
vaudeville. Their first number was Liszt's 
"Hungarian Rhapsodic, No. 2." which was 
followed with Strauss' "Blue Danube 
Waltz." Fejer later soloed with "Chan- 
son Bohemian." A potpouri of popular 
airs wound up their confa-ibution and seat 
them off to flying colors. If yesterday's 
enthusiasm can be taken as a criterion the 
orchestra is going to have an unusually 
happy time of it in vaudeville. 

Antonio Ponsetle, a robust tenor, fol- 
lowed with a pleasant mixture of classic 
and popular numbers, while Morton and 
Glass were another delight in "April." 

Belle Baker, the headliner, followed 
w4th her usual song repertoire, which 
started out fast, rapidly increased in speed 
until the finish when the talented and 
beautiful singer had a hit of gigantic pro- 
portions safely stored away. A "hebe" 
comedy song, TJow Can Yau Tell What's 
Goin^ on Behind Your Back" and a 
"Dixie" song and "Crying for Yoii" were 
among her numbers tliat scored. 

Adelaide Herman closed the show with 
a series of spectacular illusions, some of 
which she has shown here before. 

E. J. B. 



ALHAMBRA 

Monday matinee at this house saw every 
scat sold and many people standing. The 
show, from beguuiiug to end, iwas excellent 
entertainmem, and the audience showed 
their appreciation. 

The Amaut Trio, starting the show, gave 
their usual good performance of dsincing 
and acrobatics, all three playing their vio- 
lins industriously, if not too musically, 
throughout the act 

Working hard to overcome the disad- 
vantages incurred by being second were 
Mason and Shaw. The position proved not 
to be a bit of handicap, the act going over 
in great style. Miss Mason looks as much 
like a boy as any boy could and has a 
typical boy's voice. A young man sitting 
near us kindly informed us that "Its a 
girl, sure — you never saw a guy kick like 
that" Even though we had seen the act 
before' we had our doubts all over again 
until she took her hat off. 

Edna Aug and Company, with the act 
running smoothly and keeping the audience 
in rapt attention followed. "The act b such 
a wisely balanced and delightfully admin- 
istered mixture of smiles and tears diat it 
is sure to score on any vaudeville audience. 
Miss Aug works with her usual artistry, 
her specialty, "Nerves" going over well 
and the rest of her acting being nothing 
short of great. The man's voice is of ex- 
cellent quality and range, but has not the 
volume one would expect from a man of 
his build. The rest of the cast are adequate. 

Bums and Lynn, opcniiq; with their 
"Hello, Haw De Ye Do" song, proved a 
succession of laughs. Their costumes are 
funny without being overdone and the style 
of hokum they use is agreeable to the 
audience. They shart slow but warm up 
and by the time they finish are a riot 
Their dancing is good. 

Closing intermission was the S. S. 
Leviathan Orchestra, presented by Paul 
Whiteman, Inc., and staged by R. H. 
Bumside. The act proved to be one of 
the most elaborately staged and all around 
entertaining orchestra acts in vaudeville. 
It is reviewed further under new acts. 

To Joe Darcy fell the_ rather difficult 
task of opening intermission. He started 
off with a haxtg, kept piling up all the way 
through and pretty nearly stopped the 
show at the finish, with the folks out front 
yelling "One more song, Joe." He doesn't 
have to worry at this house. 

Grette Ardine and Company, the "com- 
pany" consisting of two boys, both excellent 
dancers, proved one of the finest dancing 
acts on the circuit It moves with almost 
incredible speed throughout The two boys 
are partners in a modiste shop but busi- 
ness is bad and they advertise 'Trench 
models received today." A girl comes in, 
claiming to be a French model and tells 
her story, explaining that she can also 
dance. The tiiree do a dance and in it 
interpolate one bit that is as daring as 
anything ever seen in vaudeville and could 
well be saved for a finish. The two boys 
each take a hand and foot and swing her 
between them so that her face sweeps the 
floor at each downward swoop. This dance 
is a knockout Several other numbers, 
notably a great Apache, feature the- act, 
all connected by the sensible rhymed dia- 
logue. A fine act 

Murray and Oakland, opening in the dark 
with the mystery stuff about the hooch, 
recipe, get a laugh at the start. Their 
travesty on the mystery melodramas is 
amusing and their old fashioned duet is a 
great laugh. The Spanish bit and dance 
finish are also good. The young lady is 
really beautiful and of charming person- 
ality and the man is a natural comedian, 
who can do things that would appear 
vulgar in some one else and make them 
seem just funny. 

The Bcllis Duo closed the show with a 
fiiie acrobatic entertainment C. C. 



COLONIAL 

The opening matinee performance of 
"All Nationality Week" had a fairly good- 
sized attendance present A lot of at- 
tention was attracted before the perform- 
ance by a good "bally-ho" stunt arranged 
by Johnny Collins and Luther Gobel, who 
secured the willingness of Ben Meroff and 
Marburger's Orchestra to pot the stunt 
over. The boys were seated on mar- 
quis in front of the theatre and played sev- 
eral numbers from that position, getting a 
crowd tb gather in front of tiie ^eatre 
from several blocks around. 

One of the neatest gymnastic and con- 
tortion offerings we've seen in a long time, 
opened the show, being done by Benit and 
Partner. Not only is the work presented 
effectively, but the grace with which tbey 
are done, and the stunts themselves ga to 
make up an offering which is in a class by 
itself. 

To follow a "dumb" act and then tie 
up a show is certainly something to boast 
of, and Watts and Kawley stopped this 
show as cold as it was ever stopped. 
George Watt's funny delivery of his songs, 
his talk and everytiiiog about hii^ "were 
sure-fire. Belle Hawle/s sweet person- 
ality, nice voice and good work in feedhig 
Watt's also was a strong factor in the 
success of the act. They made tt great 
for the rest of the show, getting in the 
deuce position, tiie speed and warmth which 
a sh«rw generally doesn't acquire ""^ 
about the fourth act 

Ray Raymond and Dorothy Mackaye. 
assisted by Frank L. Cloude, also soared 
heavily with their entertaining comedy skit 
by Benjamin H. Burt Raymond's "souse" 
is of the rare polite stage in alcholicism 
which brings up wonderfol memories. And 
speaking of sweet, adorable women — well. 
Raymond could take even one more drink 
in the act — a toast to Miss Mackaye. We'd 
join him, and not for the liquor's sake 
alone. The <alk is very deverty done. 

Sometimes we regret going into rhapso- 
dies about beautiful women in shows, for 
we find we have used all oar ad j ec tiv es 
on one and left ourselves with hardly any 
for the next one which comes along. So 
we'll call it even and name them the 
"three peaches," Belle Hawley, Dorothy 
Mackaye and Martha Morton. Martha is 
back again at this house with Gordon 
Dooley and together they kept the laughs 
coming every minute they were in view. 
Doolejrs "falls," especially the one over 
the footiights onto the piano in the pit 
were screams. Martha's dance work is of 
the Morton type, and that's the very best 

"The Storm,^ featuring Edward Arnold, 
supported by Guy Gunnint^m. Bell 
Barnes, Max Von Mitzel and Isis Maynard, 
closed the first half. The third act from 
the play was offered, featuring the forest- 
fire, a masterpiece of theatrical staging as 
done in this act. The climax, of this al- 
most brought the audience to their feet 
with suspense. Arnold does excellent work 
and has very good support 

Lorraine Howard and Flo Lind are do- 
ing an act very mudi similar to the one 
which Miss Howard did for several years 
with Vemk Sadler as her partner. The 
"Wedding Bells" bit is featured in this 
offering as in the other, with parts of the 
talk being used. They did fairly well Mon- 
day afternoon. 

Ben Meroff, assisted by Marburger's En- 
tertainers, a seven-piece orchestra, gave a 
fine account of himself with his versatility 
both in instrumental lines and dancing, do- 
ing sensational work in the latter line^ All 
the boys in the orchestra are also versatile 
and do well with their specialties. In 
place of imitating Gallagher and Shean, 
Meroff and one of the boys, playing saxo- 
phone and clarinet imitate Lewis and 
Dody, using props for the catch-line. .As 
Lewis and Dody haven't fdayed this honse 
in some time, the audience wasn't very fa- 
miliar with the (nt which will go well 
where the other act is known. 

Lillian Shaw closed the show, holding 
them in and getting big laughs with her 
comedy. G. J. H. 



10 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 11, 1923 




EIGHTY-FIRST STREET 

The idea of "Nationality Wedc^ is faiA- 
{uUy reflected here from the dressioj; of the 
lobby and theatre proper to those appeariog 
on the bilL For Manager Edward Lewis, 
who is a stickler for dotn^ things right, 
has incorporated representatives oi all na- 
tions in the six-act bill. "Hunting Big 
(^me in Africa." being the film attraction 
for the wedc, Lewis has dispensed witb 
the nsaal prelude. 

Upon entering the theatre patrons beheld 
the ushers garbed in costumes representing 
the various nations. A special orchestra- 
tion, "The March of the Nations," was 
utilized for an overture and to borrow 
from the vernacular of the bucolic reporter, 
"A good time was had by alL" 

Japan was ably represented in the opener 
by Prof. Nakae and Company, jin-jttsn ex- 
pert who gave a graphic demonstration 
tending to prove that science couM be made 
ever bmte force. His first im- 
pression is an encounter with a bulbar, 
who is twice his size and build and, despite 
the brute force advanced by the burglar, he 
is readily snbdued and thrown from the 
window of the bouse. ' Later lie emers a 
contest with one and .then two men and 
overpowers both. 

Harry Fauli and Mary <joss held down 
aecoiid spot nicdy with a happy combina- 
tion of comedy and songs, caiwoned "The 
Co-Weds." Both came on in wedding at- 
tire. During the unraveling of the plot it 
develops that both are collegiates being 
initiated irto a new "frat" However, 
neither loses any time in winning tte other 
and, since they are dressed for the occasion, 
a marriage is inevitable. 

The Runaway Four, a comedy <^uartette 
of deUgfatfnl vagabonds,' followed with their 
pot-ponri of dancing and^ tumbling. They 
come on as hoboes and go into a dance con- 
test, witii each trying to outdo the other. 
They change to sailor outfits and return 
for more (downing and fast stepping. The 
little expressionless member is a bom clown 
and provides a comedy ponch that cannot 
TKM anywhere. His antics Icept the mob in 
roars when Uie boys were not putting over 
some fast stepping. 

MoDie Fuller, survivor of the famous 
team of Hallen and Fuller, and who has lost 
her sight, was warmly welcomed bade to 
the "varieties" in Blandie MerrilPs made- 
to-oider vehicle, "Twilight" The act is 
based upon a foundation of reminiscences, 
has c o m edy element and packs a heart wal- 
lop that cannot escape those who remem- 
hmd the famous team of which Miss Ful- 
ler was a member. 

The story reveals the actress resting at 
an tip-State farm. The penurious landlady 
is steptical about ever getting the eight 
weeks' back board Mollie owes. MolHe has 
£aith that her friends on Broadway have 
not forsaken her, that they will find her 
and pay the bill. Her faith is rewarded by 
the appearance of a pseudo. Bert Savoy, 
who drops out of an aeroplane and mto 
Mollies oottaee. He tells her the latest 
"dirt" about Margie and tells MolIie Zieg- 
feld wants her for the "Follies." The im- 
mession of Bert Savoy is cleverly done by 
Edward Graham, while Harriet Mariotte 
dos well in a May Vokes interpretation of 
a rustic landlady. 

Tom Patricola, assisted by Hametta 
Towne, again demonstrated his ability as a 
show stopper. Tom works like. a trojan 
and Hatrietta Ls a cute little trick who can 
shake a wicked limb in a likeable way. Col- 
lectively they are a great combination. But 
Tom has it on most of the dancing boys, in 
that he Js a comedian as well and when 
he is not wowincr them with a lively dance, 
he has them roarine at his clown stuff. 

DonaM Kerr and EflRe Weston closed the 
show and revealed some remarkable step-- 
pinK. Thev had a ton«h spot to follow 
Patricola. but measured up to the emer- 
gencv brtter ftan anvone_ we know_ could 
have. . Theirs is a production art which in- 
corporates in manners .of dancing. 

E. J. B. 



BROADWAY 

This was All Nationality Week at the 
Broadway and before each act the or- 
chestra played the appropriate national 
anthem. The bill was well balanced and 
without any uncomfortable stage waits or 
other petty annoyances. This is the kind 
of bill that makes pleased patrons. 

The first act was the Australian Wood- 
choppers. It opens with the announcer 
singing "Thafs How I Believe In You," 
with lyrics appropriate to the act He has 
a way of changing the tempo every other 
line so that the orchestra leader has to be 
a mind reader to follow him. The boys 
then do their stunts of sawing, axe throw- 
ing and woodchbpping and go. over ex- 
ceptionally well for an act of this kind, 
due, more than anything else, to the show- 
manship they use. 

The Chung Hwa three, as the name 
would imply, is a Chinese Trio. They 
open with the announcement that they are 
going to sing a song and would like the 
audience to join in the chorus. They then 
render a Chinese number, and. go, without 
much waste of time into a fine routine of 
popular songs. All three have good voices 
and they harmonize unusually welL Of 
course they are a bit shy on their pro- 
mmdation but they make up for this in 
quality. The incongruity of their Scotch 
finish is good for a laugh. 

Charles Moiati and Company succeeded in 
making the audience like their act At the 
start the folks out front- began to settle 
back as if to say, "Just another one of 
those acts," but when the comedy once 
started ^ey forgot all about that and gave 
the pair the applause they deserved. Morati 
does just enough singing to show off his 
excellent voice and make the audience wish 
he would do some more. 

Wm. Edmunds and Company have a 
likable, laughable little skit Edmunds, 
as the proprietor of a shoe shop, is en- 
amoured of the leading lady of the theatre 
next door. He plans to take her to dinner 
at his cousin's Italian restaurant and when 
she says she will go, gets himself all dolled 
up in a Louis Guttenberg with the price 
tag still on. She breaks the date because 
she has to meet her husband and the Wop 
bootmaker then wishes he had charged her 
for the shoes he fixed for her. The act is 
logical and contains some little philosophy 
that gets over. Edmunds plays the char- 
acter sensibly and without too much of the 
dialect 

Hall, Ermine and Brice.have a good act. 
They open with a scene representing 
Broadway that gets a hand. The man 
does a dance that is 'good. The real hit 
of the act, though, is the great work the 
man does on the unicyde. He handles this 
thing as if he was bom on it, sin^g a 
song and making the cycle dance with as 
much ease as if he was on his feet. -The 
young lady pianist renders two numbers 
with line feeling and technique. Her selec- 
tions are "Riggoletto" and the left-handed 
aria from "Loda." The act. . goes over 
fine. 

Ruth Roye, next to closing, was the hit 
of the bill. This little performer has a 
personality all her own and a following 
all her own too. She sings all published 
numbers and makes them sound like some- 
thing new, doing best with "Lovin* Sam" 
and "I Love Me." She could have stayed 
on' all afternoon as this crowd couldn't 
seem to get enough of her. 

Little Yoshi closed the show with a fine 
acrobatic offering. 

Wanlca. and Donovan and Lee were also 
on the bill at the Broadway but not re- 
viewed at this show. C C 



PALACE 

(Cbicaco) 

There arc several treats on the bill this 
week, headed by Fanny Brice, who is being 
held over for a second week by popular 
demand. Others include Will Mahoney 
and Al Herman. 

Yost and Glady open with an offering 
of clay-modeling, which shows some very 
'good work in that line. Their French 
chatter doesn't help the act at all, and 
could be eliminated to advantage. 

Ray and Edna Tracy entertained in the 
deuce spot with a. piano and dance offer- 
ing. Miss Tracy plays exceptionally well 
and ,Ray's dance work had enough com- 
edy in it to put the dance over with many 
laughs to its credit 

Howard Langfbrd and Ina Frederick 
are back again at this house in their 
same offering, "Shopping," the scene, of 
which is laid in a lingerie shop. Al- 
though the act has been seen many times 
before, it still is so well handled. that it 
scores nicely. 

The first big hit of the .show' was rung 
up by Will Mahoney, his nut comedy 
going over so big that the audience 
couldn't get enough of it The "I Love 
Me" verses were a scream, and his bur- 
lesque Russian dance, with some really 
sensational work, brought the house 
down. 

Bobby McLean, assisted by Edna Blue, 
James Burke and Jim Waters did some 
marvelous work in their ice-skating of- 
fering. 

Although Fanny Brice introduced but 
two new numbers from her last week's 
repertoire; the audience could never tire 
of this wonderful artiste. 

A local orchestra, headed by Veme 
Buck, billed as the "Merry Garden Or- 
chestra" followed, and despite the difficult 
spot following Miss Brice, found it easy 
going. This was due to good music, good 
musicians, and a well-selected repertoire, 
in addition to isome very .good dance 
work by Buck himself. Miss Brice did 
a comedy dance with the act, and then 
brought on Al Herman, who led the or- 
chestra and also did a dance with Miss 
Brice which was a riot. In his single, 
Herman is using practically the same ma- 
terial he gave when last seen here. A 
plant in a box assists with song num- 
bers. The Flying Henrys closed the 
show, holding every one in despite the 
late hour. R. E. R. 



ACTS AND FILMS AT LYRIC 

Chicago, April 7. — The Lyric Theatre 
at Ludington, Mich., has adopted a policy 
of vaudeville and pictures for Friday and 
Saturday of each week and opened with 
the Five Cranes, Kodah and Company and 
Phesay and Powell. 



STATE.LAKE 

(CUcmgo) 

An evenly balanced bill is being played 
here this week, with Henry Santrey and 
Band, and Maragaret Young splitting 
headline honors. 

Ward and Dooley open the bill with 
an entertaining rope-spinning and comedy 
offering. Ward does a very good take- 
off on Will Rogers and Fred Stone with 
lariat and dancing stimts. Frank Whit- 
man held the second spot with a very 
good novelty violin routine. His Rus- 
sian' dance, while playing the violin made 
a great finish and almost stopped the 
show. 

Billy Dale and Company offered a com- 
edy playlet that had a great many laughs 
attached to it and incidentally, many lines 
which need blue-pencilling. A boy and 
girl give good assistance to Dale. 

Harry and Anna Seymour scored their 
usual big hit were followed by Harry 
Santrey and his band who kept up the 
fast pace set by the Seymours. 

Margaret Young was the big favorite 
with her songs and comedy, getting 
laughs and applause galore with her songs 
and character numbers. "Louisville Lou" 
was introduced as a new number and scored 
heavily. 

Ethel Parker and Ed Allen proved a 
very good closer with their songs and 
dances. Swift and Kelly and John David- 
son and Company were not on during, this 
performance. ft. E. K. 



MAJESTIC 

(Chicago) 

The Florenis opened tiie Majestic show 
with acrobatic posing on a pedestal. The 
act was nicely presented and went over 
well. 

Irene Trevette followed with a series of 
songs r'.-ndcred in a pleasing voice and 
charming manner and with words suffi- 
ciently distinct to be understood. 

Holliday and WiUette presented a talk- 
ing routine with singing spots called "De- 
tailed," which provided laughter, though a 
little classy for popular prices. 

Jimmy Russell and Company were seen 
in the Harry Langdon act, "Johnny's New 
Car," and obtained much laughter - for 
comedy which is sure-fire, being travesty 
of automobiling. Russell is quite as good 
as his predecessor in the act 

Alexandria, who pretends to be a' boob 
stage hand before essaying xylophone play- 
ing with an assistant, gets some good laughs 
with hiS'Snrkwardness. 

Henry Cataland and Company are seen . 
in a revue which is well staged in line 
with all Roger Murrell opening. Cataland 
is a pleasing entertainer and is assisted 
by three clever girl dancers and a singer. 

Spencer and Williams made a big laugh- 
ing success next to closing and proved sure- 
fire for this audience. 

Jack Chapman and band from the Drake 
Hotel closed the bill nicely, though this 
band has little to recommend it for vaude- 
ville. It makes good on its ability to play 
straight jazz numbers. R. E. R. ' 



CRESCENT MGRS. HEARING APRIL 27 

Three officials of the Shubert-Crescent 
Theatre, Brooklyn, were arraigned in the 
Adams Street Court last week on a charge 
of violating the Sunday amusement law. 
The complainant was an operative of a 
detective agency that had been retained by 
the Lord's Day Alliance. The defendants 
were Albert Goldberg, superintendent of 
the theatre; William Cohen, stage mai\- 
ager, and Sam Tauber, manager. 

They were arraigned on summonses as 
a result of a performance alleged to have 
been given on March 25. They were pa- 
roled for a hearing on April 27. 

According to the complaint "George 
Teasel's Troubles," the unit show that had 
been the current attraction during the 
week of March 19, gave iu regular per- 
formance on Sunday evening, which the 
Alliance contend was a -violation of the 
code. 



TANGUAY BREAKS RECORD 

Chicago, April 7. — Eva Tan'guay broke 
all records at the Chateau theater here on 
Monday April 2, after having broken all 
Sunday records the day previous. The 
Sunday record was hard to break inas- 
much as several shows. there this season 
have apparently done every cent possible, 
but Harry Beaumont and the Chateau 
force managed to squeeze a few more 
people in. 



"GOLDEN THRILL" FOR VAUDE. 

Mindlin and Goldreyer have purchased 
"The Golden Thrill," a one-act sketch by 
Morris Abel Beer, which they -will pre- 
sent on the Keith 'Vaudeville Circuit next 
month. Casting of the four characters 'will 
begin this week with Clarence Derwent 
staging the act 

OLCOTT SHOW IN BALTIMORE 

□launcey Olcott under the manage- 
ment -of the Selwyns is ai^in on the 
stage and opened on Monday night in 
Baltimore in Rachel Crothcrs' "The 
Heart of Paddy Whack." 

NEWHOFF & PHELPS BOOKED 

Newhoff and Phelps have been booked 
for a tour of the Loew Circuit opening at 
the Gates Theatre, Brooklyn, on April 30. 



April 11, 1923 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



11 





FRANKLIN 

(Lut tbIO 

TIte ufual six tryouts preceded the regular 
ahow. and between these, the N, V. A. drive, 
and the feature film, "Fury," it was twclve^thirty 
before the entire show was over. The quality 
of the trycnts this week ecsily made up for the 
poorness of those who showed acts the preceding 
Thursday nijzbt. 

Nassimo and Rinaldo opened with a strong 
man and gymnavtic wcrk. with some instnimcntal 
bits thrown in for novelty. These two ore ready 
fur the fiverage bill no^. 

The Edanac Quartette, a Scotch male combiaa> 
tion. have the voices to do a real Kood act. Their 
routine, as done here, needs cutting. With some 
work to take tbeir rough edges off, tbey*U do 
nicely. 

Bingham and Meyers scored heavily with a 
comedy and singing routine. The man uses ma- 
terial from almost every talking act in vaude- 
ville. Most of -it may be released. Practically 
all of it is old enough to be in that class. 

One of the classiest hoy and girl ads we've 
seen in a long time, even in a regular show, 
CAioe with Bnxkman and Howard, who, assisted 
by a girl pianist^ tied up the show and stopped 
It cold. 'They have spent lots of money in stag- 
ing their act, but their money hasn't been wasted. 
It's good enough right now to step into any big 
time bill and hold its own.' Personality, ability 
and showmansLip arc possessed by the team. 
That's all that's needed. 

Geoffrey' O'Hara. ilw assincd by a girl pian- 
ist, offered a routine of his own songs. O'Hara 
wrote "K— K — K Katy,*' one of the war song 
bits, and rendered it as one of his feature num- 
bers. O'llara- fieeirs to have a fairly good voice, 
but the numbers he used didn't give bim a chance 
to display it. Singing a number called "The 
Living God," which he announced as dedicated 
to the Saviour, is in poor taste for anv vaude- 
ville thcatrcv and all the nwre so in this one, 
which probably had about three or four people 
out of the 3,000 present who weren't Jewish. 
Then he sang a number in Yiddish. 

**The Lease Ureakers** have a gnoi idea in. 
the presentation of thcii jazz revue, consisting of 
a five-piece band, a girl singer, a dancer, and 
two men who handle the comedy. It makes a 
good flash for the imalt time route. 

The N. V. A. drive followed, under the lead- 
ership of Harry Shaw and Murray Rose, who 
are very populai here. 

The regular bill Vkus started by BAdcr and 
Label] and company, two men and two girls, 
who did a very good bicj'cle acL lu the last 
scene, the girls wear b£tbing suits, which called 
for tumultuous applause from the boys in the 
audience. The oldest man in the act, thinking 
that they were applauding their efforts, came 
back and made a speech of thanks I Yes, Bar- 
Dum was right. 

Maureen Englin legitimately stopped the show. 
Miss Englin is coming along finely, has the num- 
bers, the ability and the delivery and will soon 
be cue of the featured fonale singles in vaude- 
vUle. 

"The Ring Tangle," featuring Edythe May 
and Jack Henry, with two other people in the 
cast, kept the laughs coming steadily. The dance 
work, especblly that of Miss May's, is very 
good. 

Bloom snd Shcr were a comedy bit in their 
efforts thowing the various xrays of making love. 
Bloom is a good ad lib comedian and Miss Sber 
gives capable support. 

Kerr and Weston, with Lou Handman at the 
piano, stopped the show in closing it, coming 
back for an cnrore. Donald Kerr is doing some 
real dancing, shows bis abilities as he should 
hare done earlier this season. Handman is one 
of the be5t pianists in vaudeville, for he is not 
only just a pianist, but a showman as well, and 
helps sell the artists he accompanies as well as 
himself. G. J. H. 

HAMILTON 

(Last Half) 

OwiOE to the leninh of the feature film. 
"Fury," starring Richard Barlhclemesj. which 
tan for ninety minutes, the vaudeville till was 
cut to five acts. The auditiice on Thursday 
afte r noon eriUertily came to sre the picture and 
not the TRudevile, for they were unusually un- 
appreciative and weak in their applause. As a 
rule, this audience is a gcod one for acts. 

The Australian Wocdchoppeis opened the bill 
with tbeir exhibition of sawing and chopping. 
The act is rather short, hut proved interesting. 

Emit Borco h^ made a few changes in his act 
since we last saw him at this house. Bcreo may 
be entertaining to seme, but we can't sec what 
it is all about. A lot of songs, consisting mainly 
of guttural, nasal and hissing sounds, make up 
his routine, and these sounds might be called 
humor by those who ran ftcc anything funny in 
them. 



Harry Harden and company offered their com- 
edy sketch and seoced the laugh hit of the show. 
Hayden has a new man in the cast who needs a 
lot of improvin^c. This chap reads his lines auto- 
matically, with no expression either facially or 
vocally. He constantly gazes off-stage to the op* 
posite directim of where the person he is ulking 
to is standing, and has various other faults 
which give the impr«ssion that he is doing any- 
thing but playing his part. Hayden'a work alone 
was responsible for the fact that the act went 
over. 

Lydell and Macy never drew as few laughs* 
in the many, times which we have seen them, as 
they did h'ere on Thursday afternoon. The ex- 
cellence of the characters played by both men, 
aikd their materials didn't cecm to mean a thing 
to TTK<st of these in the audience. And yet, this 
act should easily have been the bit of the show. 

Wilkens ?.n4l Hugbes, asstrted by a pianist, 
dosed the show with a very good danoe offering, 
well-Aagcd and routined. The girl is pretty and 
has on attractive personality. When it comes to 
ability, both arc v:ry good. - G. J. H. 



PROCTOR'S 5TH AVENUE 

(Last Half) 

The ballyhoo in behalf of the N.' V. A. drive 
for its Sick Fund and the promise of extra fea- 
tures daily undoubtedly attracted the capacity 
audience which ushered in the last half at the 
Thursday matinee. The extra feature failed to 
materialize unlets the collection for the actors' 
charity could ^be classified as such, but the eight- 
act bill was of sufficient entertaining calibre to 
hdd them in until after the cloier. 

Hany Moore opened the show with a paper 
tearing novelty, injecting a lively line of chatter 
while designing attractive dewdads from ordinary 
paper, which he aceompliahed by tearing much 
after the fashion of the stunts the kiddies do 
with scissors. The novettv of the act for vaude- 
ville coupled with the bright line of talk stuff got 
over nicely. 

Raymond and Schram follmved with their fa- 
miliar potpouri of songs and clcwninv. These 
boys acem to improve with each successive im- 
portance and have a sense of showmanship that 
prompts them to keep their offering as timely as 
possible by constantly revising their nuitcrial and 
scogs. Their "Kid from Madrid" and "Rag. 
■ time Rigolettn" were both accorded a vociferous 
hand and sent the boys off to flying colors, 
i Btims and Allen, a likable mixed team, were 
other valuable as.«ets to the comedy department 
in a piece captioned "Sixty-Forty." As one 
might s'lspect, the young wciuan is en the short 
end of the bargain. The man dc«9 a finale hcp- 
per, who bulls his way into the affectioiis of the 
girl, takes Iter rings, her heart and everything, 
and nakrs her like it. The act is with srnjs 
and no Htile amount of good humor. For the 
line of «tuff it is above the average "two act" 
and will andoubtcdly score anywhere as well as 
it did here. 

Billie Shaw and company have one of the 
most pretentious tabloid revues it has been our 
pleasure to glimpse this scaMin. Money has been 
spent with a free hand, both for the costuming 
and scenic equipment. Were it not fot the fact 
that it lets down m spots it would be an ideal 
flsh act for the big time. 

The revue is subdivided into a series of six 
song Mcncs, each of which are gorgeously cos- 
tumed and enlists the services of the cast of 
nine. Although c«tensibly planned to exploit the 
terpstchorean talents of Miss Shaw, there arc 
several nthcrs in the offering who make her step 
some to retain Cellar honcrs. She is ^(uccessful. 

but the others finish a dangerously dose second. 
Among those contributing to the success of the 
piece are, in addition to Miss Shaw, Josephine 
I.a Voie, also an arcrmplished dancer; Lester 
Lane and Harrie Oliver. Six attractive and 
shapely girl? comprise the ensemble. 

Harry and Fmma Sharrock were as amusing 
as ever with their c mhination of comedy and 
clairvoyaney. "Behind the Grandsuind.** They 

Utilize their familiar crmedy routine at the open- 
ing and wind up with Harry gring among tbe 
audience and sdecting articles which Emma de- 
scribes. 

"Fifty Miles from Broadway." tbe rustic musi- 
cal comedy, in which Harry Watson and Regi- 
nald Merivale are featured, proved anotlier genu- 
ine treat of the bill. Thin act has been reviewed 
so often that it i.c tinnecessary to go into farther 
detail. Watson and Merivnle cmtinue to con- 
vulse the audience with their delineation of small 
time fuedisis. Sandwiched between their affray 
is any araonnl cf lively situations and several 
songs and daccn. 

Freda and Anthony scored their usual hit with 
their Italian, character dclineattf os and instru- 
mental achie\-ement9. Their GallaBher and Shcan 
imprc«sion was \ veritable wow. 

Silva Brann and Company dosed the show 
^ith a clever halancing and acrobatic offering. 

E. J. B. 



REGENT 

(Lut lUf) 

The last half bill at the Regent presented sunc 
rather good entertainment, the featare of the bill, 
outside of the moving picture, '*Fury," being the 
Sig Newman Orchestra, which received top bill- 
ing, although several either acts on the hill re- 
ceived more appbusc. 

Jolm S. Blondy and company opened with an 
acrobatic and hand balancing act. A girl works 
in the act who is good looking and shapdy, hot 
there is no other necessity for her, as she -can- 
not dance nor does she do any tricks. The men 
have several fine balandng stunts. , 

Charles M'oratl and company, the company be- 
ing Miss Grace Harris, proved thonsdves worthy 
of a better spot than the- dencc, anid, in fact, 
were as good, if not better, than- anything on 
the bill. ' Morati has an cxcdlcnt voice, bis m- 
dition of '*Vesti la Gtnbha" tearing down the 
house. The act takes the form of an interview, 
the youtig lady posing as a reporter, seeking to 
gain a story of the singer'a life, tbe ct^medy be- 
ing handled by the singer, who misnndcrstands 
the questions and mispnmounces his answerm, 
and the girl, who makes wise cracks .iboot him. 
The tone is kept all tbe way through and the 
punch laugh, although obvlons, cdoic* at the fin- 
ish and is perfectly logical. The act is a dandy 
and scoird havily. . 

Porter J. White. and company, in. .a skctdi 
called **Tbe Odd Gcntlctnan,'* served rather diffi- 
cult fare for a vaudevDle'audtence» but the folks 
out front ate it nji. The play is well cast, the 
girl who takes the part of the wife' not having 
much to do and not, nnder any circnmstancca, 
being entitled to a bow. Ontside of this minor 
fault tbe act is fine, and if it goes everywhere 
else as it did at the Regent should have no 
trouble in keeping ' working. 

Canon and Wniard frllowrd in "Meet the 
Doctor.** This act is built for laughing pur- 
p?5es, but teems lacking in material. Tbe come- 
dian works on the style of the old medicine doc- 
tor and ddivers a speech to the audience that 
somehow Just misses being funny, fbc bit of 
astrology if amaleorish in its conecpttoa and ia 
ret partirtOarly well eieciited either. The act 
(Ices get over on the finish, the falls and the 
narodies putting a punch in that the audience 
likes. 

I'he Sig Newman Orchestra finished off the 
l>crfcrmance. lliis orcheatra is built along Ben 
Hemic lines and is listed as a Ben Bemie offer- 
inR. They did not do as well as might be a- 
pected, the tempo being a little off and tbe ar- 
rangements not bdng in any way remarkable. 
Neninan, doing a Bemie, dees not speak his lines 
with the same spontaneity that his spcnsor on- 
f^oys and makes hjs wise cracks sound stilted. 
The repcrtmre consists of "Honesick,** "Chi- 
cago." "Lnllaby" and "Hot Lips," with "Samp- 
son and Ddilah" treated bnroorously and "Galla- 
gher and Shcan" done as "In Jerusalem" for 
encores. The audience was walking out all 
through the acL What the act needs is work 
»nd plenty of i*, and needs another trampct in- 
stead of two pianos. C. C. 



PROCTOR'S 23RD STREET 

(Urt Half) 

The fcati-.rc picture has the edge ot the vaude- 
ville bill by a wide margin. It is the screen 
drama. "Fury," the first of a scries in which 
Richard Rartbdmess and Dontfay Gisb are to 
be offered as co'starr. Beth being strong favor- 
ites with thr local folk, the film is undoubtedly 
tlie magnet which attracted the beat Thursday 
nisht audience seen here this season. 

Tlie vaudeville department is the routine smalt 
time bill, sufficiently divetsified to provide good 
fi-.n, but boasting nothing thai stands out from 
the rank and file. 

Moran, Sis and Carp pacenukers to 

a routine of danced and instrmnental numbers. 
The girls did three sets of dances, while the 
men bridged the wait gaps with selections upon 
the violin, first offering a dassic and later a 
popular medley. The- girlo are attractive, agUe 
with the footwork and make a pleasant appear- 
ance. 

Dorothy Richmond and company dcnced In 

"Marriage a la Vaudeville.** A protoguer gives 

the impression that two yctmg people from the 
neighborhood have onnsented to get married on 
the stage of tbe theatre, l^fiss Richmond and 
her partner enter from the rear of the lower 
tlocr. Upon the stage they are joined in wed- 
lock. A motion picture trailer, displaying con^ 
edy captions, denotes the pasung of time. A 
year has dapsed and they are both in the di- 
vorce courts. By a dever ruse the judge smooths 
out the difference and the couple leave arm lo 
arm to resume their marital estate. The act is 
a novelty, btit needs mocb working over before 
it can create any excitement 'even upon the small 
time circuit. ^ ■ : : 



Orville Stamm, the ntbletr, has woven a flash 
act anf nrl his Sandow feats which he calls. 
"The. Lo\*e Pirate,** and in which he is assisted 
by four attractive and shapely young women. 
The latter are utilized for several ensembles and 
in one spot of the act Stamm holds thcra op in. 
a packing caie with merely a knee and neck gripe 
At the finish he carries them off twined around 
him in a grouping that has been done by the 
divers Arab troupes. Aside from being a cairital 
vehicle for Stxmm*s herculean feats^ the piece ia 
a diverting flash* act that can hold its own on 
any bill. 

Arthur WhitcUw, veteran monnlogixt and top- 
ical songster, waif tbe hit of the bill from an 
audience standpoint. His succession of narra- 
tives about bis friend Clancy kept tbe audioite 
in rofus, as did his htunurous choruses ok *^t*s 
a Wonderfol Place," 

Tbe Bison City Fonr blended comedy with har- 
mony in a scries of songs that readily twooght 
merited re^onse from tbe mob. The boya arc 
there with the ."pipca" as strong as ever and 
have one of the beet acts of their arvcr. It U 
the sort that tho small time audiences wiU 
eat Dp. 

Kimial' and Company, Japanese lUtistioiusts, 
closed tbe bin witlTa ivotuie of famfllar stnnta, 
some of whkh were handled in a new way. 

E. J. B, 

STATE 

(Lut Hfttf) 

Tlie Three Arahim, opened with an ■■■iiiliitiiil 
cf acn^atic and other 8ttuit% dooe in their ac- 
cQftomed'aldUfal manner^ which acta than apart 
from the usual nm. 

In the second ipot. Alice and Lneille Sheldon.' 
one of them at the ptano^ ang l ewe ia l popular, sc-' 
lectiona, in good voice and pleastnc atyle. The 
girls not onlr sing a longi but pot it over vith 
a bit of added material that makes it worth while. 
All of their staff ia excellent. 

Tilyou and Rcgcrs, past masters at the art of 
difficult tumbling and acrobatic dancing, scored 
with some comedy as well as their itmit*. For 
an openinir bit ne of them hands out a baUyhM 
about numliey.gland senm which rei'uniutes the 
patient instantly wbsi injected. The "patient** is 
apparently rccroited firm the audience and gets 
nnmeroos langba aa he ambit* down the siile to 
the stage and takes hia injection. 

Will Stanton and conpany in a comedy sketch 
that gives ample oppoitonity to Stanton^for bb 
talruu aa an ineteiate supplied good cntertain- 
ment all the time the Ait was on. Host of the 
action takes place in a cabaret with aome ntlrl- 
cal work dcoe hy the ng singer, first rale xviin 
solus by tbe waiter and another member of tfaa 
cast acting as the wife. For a finishing puncb 
the waiter chases the drunk around tbe stage and 
into tbe audience in an effort to ccQect the 

Eddie Nelson, in blackface proved is be a 
comedian out of the ordinary and out who may 
grow out of vaudeville in time. His style is 
pleasing and his voice all that one would desire 
of a blackface singer. With the possible excep- 
tion (if tbe red tie stuff his materia] is good and 
could easily get along without the objectionable 
gag. His vccal efforts all went over strongly. 

"A Night in Spain." Spaaisb revue, doKd the 
show. Tbe offering has been playing ihc Keith 
time until reccofly. and is wcU staged, costumed, 
danced and sung. Tbe cast is Spanish a^ the 
whole nK.YCS with much s(<ced to tuneful music 

H. H. S. 



JUANITA HANSEN IN VAUDEVUXE 

Juanita Hansen who through her drag 
escapades has managed to gamer a ream 
of publicity in the dailies began a lecturing 
tour in vaudeville theatres with a fifteen- 
minute lecture on an "Exposi of The 
Drug Traflfic" at the Harlem Opera 
House Monday. The tour is tinder the 
management of Joseph Lee, a film ex- 
ploitation expert who is using three press 
agents with the act as well as having the 
"Confessions" of the screen star pab- 
lished in the syndicate of Hearst's news- 
papers. After the New York break in 
this week Miss Hansen is routed for a 
tour of the large Eastern cities. A guar- 
antee of $2,000 a week on a percentage 
basis is a^cd for the act by Lec. 



ACROBAT BADLY INJURED 

Sam Fbahqsco, April 11. — Cleo Rnsti. 
a performer who appeared in an acrobatic 
act at the Orphemn, in Oakland, fell dtir- 
ing her act and suffered a fractared arm 
and bodily injuries^ She was taken to 
the Oakland Emergency Hospital. 



12 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 11, 1923 




LEO ZARRELL & CO. 

Tbemtn— Regent. 
Style — Acrobatic, 
limit— Ten minutes. 
SetOaf—Special in "one-and-a-half." 

The act opens in front of a drug store 
-window, a newsboy crying his papers 
and passed by the man who demon- 
strates beetle bugr oil in the store win- 
dow. The demonstrator gets into his 
woridng clothes and proceeds to give his 
spiel about the marvelous results 
achieved by the use of this oil, in- 
terrupted by wise cracks from the newsjr. 
He gives the newsy a bottle of the oil, 
the newsy applies it and is immediately 
able to do some acrobatic stunts. The 
demonstrator comes out and the cur- 
tain is lowered, the two going to one 
and performing se\'eral great hand- 
balancing stunts. They havft a spec- 
tacular repertoire, from the opening to 
the closing trick and win great applause. 
The only fault with the act as it stands 
now is tbe opening portion. Ttie talk 
drags because they wait for lau^s and 
don t snap up their cues quick enough. If 
their talk was given rapid-fire fashion it 
would go better. The act is good for any 
bill after this fault is corrected. C. C 



NEW ACTS AND REAPPEARANCES 



CHOY LING HEE TROUPE 

TIUMtn— Jefferson. 
8tt>»^rientat stunts. 
Timt— Twenty tHinuUs. 
BttOnt—Full stage. 

Several Chinamen, a woman and b^y 
girl or midget doing a familiar routine 
of Stuff. The offering is saved, how- 
ever, by the b^y girl who is a marvelous 
little showgirl, as well as acrobat and 
contortionist. She puts over a few songs 
also. Another saving feature and a real 
thriller is the dosing stunt of one of 
the men. 

The "thriller." at the close of the show 
19 done by one of the men who dives 
througfa a row of octagonal rings about 
30 inches in diameter set across a table. 
Protruding through die rings are sharp 
Imives and Ae dangerous aspect of the 
Stunt send a murmur of comment all 
through the house, for the space must be 
ga^ed -very accurately. Possibly the 
kuves are capable of giving way if any 
pressure is applied, but it is a corking 
stunt anyway. 

The rest of the routine outside of the 
two above mentioned things is ordinary 
and composed in part of the whirling 
plates on bamboo sticks, and a few magic 
tricks. Orioital tapestry is in the -back- 
ground and native dress also helps. ' 

M. H. S. 



THE OXFOBD REVUE 

Theatre— Prortor*j SSlh Street. 
Style — f nstrumentaJ. 
Ibno — Twelve mmules. 
Setting— Fu// stage (special). 

Two girb and two young men offer 
"The Oxford Revue," which consists 
entirely of in sli uiu ental work. Just why 
the name "revue" is used, may be able 
to be explained by the members of the 
act. The only reason we can see is the 
fact that the act <works in full stage, 
and uses some very beautiful scenic ef- 
fects, in addition .to various colored 
lifting effects and a scrim. However, 
the term "revue" has been applied to 
acts with even less provocation, so wt 
can let that go. 

Three of the members play comets, 
and the other a saxophone all through 
the act One of the girls shifts to a 
violin tor several mnnbers. also doing 
a solo bit with this instrument. Their 
l e ueiloii e coosists mainly of popular pub- 
lidwd nombers and are welt played. As 
n flash in the smalt time houses, the of- 
fering should find plenty of work. 

G. J. H. 



DORIS RANKIN & CO. 

TbtMim— Jefferson. 
Style — Dramatic sketch. 
Time — Twenty-two minutes. 
Settini_/« 'W" {special). 

Most everyone is femiHar with the 
story of the ex-convict who was hounded 
by the detectives from one job to an- 
other. In this case it is the wife who 
is hounded from one job to another by 
lier husband whom she has left, after 
sufficient cause. The staging of the 
sketch is that of the blade eye back- 
ground and overhead spot. There are 
five scenes, each in "two" and taking 
up one-half of the width of the stage. 
Eiach scene allows Miss Rankin, in the 
role of the wife, a bit of dramatic re- 
dtatioa, which she does well, and one 
of the scenes brings a bit of comedy. 
Although the offoing seems a bit high- 
brow, it went over strongly at this house 
wben reviewed. The supporting cast of 
three men and a boy did very welt with 
their respective parts, with &e possible 
exception of the latest emplo}rer of Mrs. 
Carleton, who does not do very much 
to create the impression that he is in 
love with her, 

The act opens in an office scenes the 
man telling the woman that he has re- 
ceived some sort of a communication to 
discharge her, and she insists upon tell- 
ing him the facts and whole story be- 
hind her sepaiation from her husband. 
As she laundies into the story there is 
a flashback to another scene and the 
Carletons are seen in a domestic (juarrel. 
Thus husband is drunk and abusive, and 
insists that his -wife give him her neck- 
lace to pay for a gambling debt he has 
incurred. In protecting herself she 
shoots him and leaves. 

Scene two is the room of a boy to 
whom Mrs. Carleton, under the name 
of Miss Allen, is governess. He plays 
with his drum before going to bed. and 
as he is a b<^ scout tells his governess 
that he has been permitted to stay up 
a little later that night by his grandma. 
This is a lie and Miss Allen knowing 
it gives him a lesson on it, the boy ad- 
mitting the prevarication, and then going 
off to sleep after giving her a note he 
had in his pocket and which he almost 
bad forgotten. The note requests- the 
girl to leave at once, evidently having 
heard from her husband. This scene is 
apparently not absolutely .essential but 
needed in order to complete the other 
set probably. 

A modiste shop is scene four and an 
effeminate costumer flits around, drapes 
a bit of cloth over Miss Allen and 
diinks that she would make a pretty 
model. He also receives a communica- 
tion from the husband and decides to 
discharge her. Before leaving, however, 
she told him of the intolerable conditions 
of his store and hardships he worked on 
the poor shop girls, etc. In the mean- 
time he got as much comedy out of his 
characterization as possible. 

The final scene shows her concluding 
her stor>' to her employer, from all ap- 
pearances a lawyer, and he tells her that 
he has asked her husband to come in to 
see them. The husband steps into his 
favorite role of abusing his wife, and 
she tells him that she has received a 
decree of divorce in Rhode Island, where 
she resided for several months, etc The 
employer also asserts his richt to kick 
friuid husband out of his office and the 
latter leaves. The divorce story is only 
a subterfuge and the man advises her to 
try Reno for Ae necessary papers. Very 
cokHy and in a matter of fact way he 
asks Miss Allen to stay, and says that 
they will continue^ the real business of 
life, meaning marriage. M. H. S. 



MAZIE, HELEN AND DAISY 

Theatre— Prortor"* 23rd Street. 

Style— P«w. 

Time — Eighteen minutes. 

SetUn^-Speciai: 

This is a fairly diverting- musical 
tabloid, ostensibly framed for the small 
time and which managed to crowd a 
number of specialties into a sen^lance 
of plot that is above the average for 
this class of offering. 

The action is set in a mountain house 
owned by an eccentric German. Mazie 
and Daisy, who have been stranded -wiffi 
a touring "turkey" are working out their 
board bills as maids at the resort. A 
promoter and his prima donna loom upon 
the scene and after a succession of 
comedy scenes ropes the Dutdnnan in 
to "angel" his show. Consequently, 
Mazie and Daisy are. again restored to 
their proper vocations. 

Helen, the prima donna, renders "Cry- 
ing For You and immediately proceeds 
. to vamp the comic. It is mainly througfa 
her machinations that tie parts with the 
money with which she is to be starred. 
After the promoter secures the money, 
it is all fixed for a honeymoon for him 
and Helen. Incidental to the dimajc 
Mazie and Daisy do a couple of dances, 
one of which needs considerable clean- 
ing up before it will ever mean anything. 

A routine finale, vrith the comic doing 
a parson and the promoter and Helen 
garbed in bridal array, closed the act. 

The piece can stand a Uttle tightening 
up and a rearrangement of the dancing 
specialties, after which it should prove 
a strong feature for the small time. 

E. J. B. 



CLAIRE VINCENT AND CO. 

Theatre— Proc/or'i SSth Street. 

Style-S*e/f/i. 

Time — Twenty-one minutes. 

Settinjf— Fu/{ stage (.special). 

Miss Vincent is supported by a girl 
and a man in her comedy offering whicJi 
will please in the average family audi- 
ence. The story concerns a ^rl, who in 
the playlet, is the -ward of Miss Vincent, 
and who has been engaged to a rich 
young man. This engagement was broken 
off by his father, who objects to his 
son's marrying, simply because he thinks 
that the boy is too young to be married, 
and cares only for business matters, hav- 
ing a reputation of being "hard-boiled." 
The girl's guardian hears her talc of 

woe, and decides to take things in her 
own hands to patch them up. She tele- 
phones the fauier to come over to the 
apartment and ge.ts him to make an ap- 
pointment with her: She is to essay the 
role of the boy's fiancee, while her ward 
will play the part of the house-maid, 
owing to the fact that their real maid is 
having her day off. 

The father arrives and the guardian 
sets about making a fool of him, finally 
getting his consent to his son's marrying 
any young girl whom he may love and 
loves him. She then reveals her real 
character and introduces her ward as his 
son's sweetheart. The father has become 
attached to the guardian, and from all 
appearances, when the curtain descends, 
there .is going to be a double wedding 
very shortly. 

Miss Vincent is a good comedienne and 
handles her role to good laugh results. 
The other two in the cast lend capable 
sunMrt G. J. H. 



Henry Hyers. author of "The First 
Fifty Years, has -written a one-act farce 
which is to be played in vaudeville by 
Charles Deland. 



IRENE RICARDO 

Theatre— Proc/or'j S8r/i Street. 
Style— Cotnedy. 
Time — Twelve minutes. 
Setting— /» "one." 

Irene Ricardo is half of the former 
combination of Cooper and, Ricardo. 
When it comes to ability as a comedi- 
enne, 'Miss Ricardo could easily feel safe 
when she started to do a single, for she's 
one of the cleverest women we've seen 
in vaudeville, in getting laughs. Her big 
assets are her facial expressions, which 
might be classed as a cross between Eddy 
Foy and Fanny Brice. 

Miss Ricardo opens in the lady "Jew- 
ish Cop" uniform wbich she wore in the 
two acts, and does some talk with the 
orchestra leader. A comedy number 
about her "horsie," whom she calls "Pa- 
gliacci" is a scream from start to finish, 
more because of her handling of it than 
because of die lyrics. A prima donna 
burlesque follows which is easily as 
funny as any number of this type done 
by Fannie Brice. "Sleepy Hills of Ten- 
nessee" is used in straight style for a 
finish. 

Irene Ricardo can play the big time 
houses right now, if only on the merits 
of her personal ability. Her material is 
good, but we honestly think that diere 
isn't enough of it that's worthy of her. 
Miss Ricardo would be classed as a sec- 
ond Fanny Brice, if she had numbers 
as good as those which Miss Brice uses. 

G. J. H. 

MORGAN AND BINDER 

Theatre— Prorfor'i 23rd Street. 
Style-^onf J and talk. 
Time — Fifteen minutes. 
Settlng_/» "om." 

. Here's a couple of female harmony 
singers who have routined a singing and 
tallong act that will be sure fire on any 
bill — big_ or small time. Both girls have 
good voices and the comic sells her stuff 
for more than top value. The girls 
■ scored strongly in a bad spot at this 
house. 

A ballad duct brings them on and con- 
vinces the mob that they are real sing- 
ers. They counter with some clever 
comedy chatter that is brimful of 
spontaneous laughs. 

The comedienne follows -with impres- 
sions of Eddie Leonard and Galli Curd, 
singing a bootlegging number. Her 
partner returns and they harmonize "I'm 
Sweet On My Sweet Sweetie," -with 
the comic managing to crowd in as 
much comedy patter as possible and keep- 
ing the crowd in yells. They encored 
with "Sweet Baby of Mine" and left 
them begging for more. 

The act packs an entertaimnent wallop 
that cannot fail to hit. Consequently, 
the girls will be a valuable comedy and 
harmony asset to any bill. R J. B. 

OLGA AND NICHOLAS 

Theatre— /?eie)if. 
Style — Dancing. 
Time — Ten minutes. 
Settuiz— Special. 

Olga and Nicholas have a dancing act 
that is away out of the ordinary. They • 
open before a special drop in harlequin 
costumes and go through a double toe 
routine that is neat and efficient The 
woman exits to make her change and 
the man does a difficult routine of toe 
work and kicks. The woman does an 
oriental before a bronze God painted on 
the back drop, the man enters in Russian, 
performs some difficult steps and is 
joined by Olga for a fast, effective Rus- 
sian finish. The girl is good looking and 
nicely formed and they both work as if 
they enjoyed it The act is -well con- 
structed and does not slow up from start 
to finish. Some of the toe work is ex- 
ceptional. The act should prove accept- 
able in any house. C C. 



April 11, 1923 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



13 



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WALTER VAUGHAN, EDITOR 



New York, Wednesday, April 11, »23 



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ONE DAY OF REST 

The contest being waged between a 

Soup of theatre managers and the Lord's 
ly Alliance anent the legality of Sun-, 
day performance took an unexpected turn 
last week when Fred Stone, musical con>- 
edy star and president of the National 
Vaudeville Artists was called upon by the 
churchmen to show his hand in the matter 
and replied that he was in favor of the 
abolition of Sunday shows. The Al- 
liance will use Stone's declaration as its 
salient when the hearing of the Meyer bill 
comes up for hearing next week. The 
hearing will be held in Albany. William 
.A. Brady and other managers will make 
the trip to argue for the passage of the 
bill which would legalize all manners of 
theatrical performances on Sundays. On 
the other hand the Lord's I)ay Alliance 
will be flanked by a delegation from the 
Actors' Equity, who will bitterly oppose 
the passage of the measure. 

Equity has distributed petitions among 
its membership and will fUe them in su^ 
port of their argument that the actor is 
entitled to a six day wedc the same as 
the tradesman. 

Stone's frankness of his position in the 
matter may lead the controversy to aim 
at vaudeville performances which hereto-- 
fore have not figured largely in the pow- 
wow. But since Brady has capitalized 
upon the idea that the legit had been dis- 
criminated against in permitting vaudeville 
shows to continue and to prohibit "legit" 
performances, Stone's statement may be- 
come a potent weapon in the hands of 
Mr. Bowlby's organization. 

While the Actors' Equity view is not 
from a religious or "blue law" angle, the 
actors' organization maintain that the 
actors work under a more severe strain 
than a layman and are equally entitled to 
a day of relaxation and recreation in each 
week. 

Should the Meyer bill be defeated it is 
understood that the Lord's I>ay Alliance 
will direct their attention to closing the 
vaudeville and motion picture houses. 



FOREIGN ACTORS STILL TO COME 

(Reprinted from the N. Y. Herald). 
Theatregoers who thought that with the 
arrival in New York of the Russian 
players who have had so important a part 
m the dramatic season of 19Z2-1923 the 
resources of foreign dramatic colonies 
likely to send representatives to America 
must be exhausted did not take account 
of the numerous artists abroad who are 
eager to enjoy some of thir rewards of 
their profession in a prosperous and 
peaceful country. There will be num- 
erous locally unfamiliar actors from 
Europe on the stages of New York next 
winter. 

Max Reinhardt's engagement to pro- 
duce here a series of the spectacles and 
dramas with which hb fame in Europe 
is associated was announced several 
months ago. Mr. Reinhardt will not 
work with bis accustomed associates in 
this countrjr. He will employ American 
actors in his efforts for the New York 
theatre, but the enterprises will be alto- 
gether foreign in spirit. 

Germany will not have a monopoly in 
sending its celebrities here. The gifted 
Guitrys will come from Paris. The plays 
of Sacha Guitry, who is comedian as well 
as dramatist, are already well known in 
New York. David Belasco has put three 
of them before a public to which they 
must often have been unsympathetic in 
sentiment and action, but they have never- 
theless made their author well known. 
His father, Lucien Guitry, who is famous 
as an actor, will also be seen here for the 
first time. A third member of this tal- 
ented family is Yvonne Printempts, wife 
of the playwri^t, and she will appear in 
the performances which the actors will 
give in French. 

To make the next theatre year still 
more polyglot, Raquet Meller, a Spanish 
singer who has recently delighted Paris, 
will appear here. Moreover, the Kamer- 
ney Players, who come from Petrogard, 
will be added to the list of European 
visitors. , . 

There is plenty of time for others to 
decide on a tour in this prosperous land. 
Alread]r there are enough announced to 
make it plain that the refinements of 
European stage art will not be missing 
from New York next season. 



MIDNIGHT "GO-CO" CUT OUT 

Beginning this week John Colt's musi- 
cal comedy "Go-Go" at Daly's 63rd Street 
will abandon tiha midnight Wednestlay 
matinee and give an afternoon matinee in- 
stead. With the White attraction at the 
63rd Street house, slumming parties were 
not as plentiful for the matinee as they 
were with "Shuffle Along" and "Liza* 
when these attractions were playing there. 
The elimination of the midni^t perform- 
ance of "Go-Go" leaves the Wednesday 
midnight show field dear for "Liza 
which is continuing to draw good business 
from them at the Nora Bayes Theatre. 



SHUBERTS TO DO "BAL TABARIN" 

As a successor to the "Chauve Souris" 
which closes on the Century Theatre 
Roof next Saturday the Messrs. Shubert 
will early in May present a revue en- 
titled, "Bal Tabann," with the music by 
Gene Schwartz and Fred Coots and the 
lyrics by McElbert Moore. Harry Mor- 
ton and Zdla Russell, who rehearsed two 
days with "The Bamboo Tree" will head 
the cast of the New Century Roof revue 
which will go into rehearsal this week. 



CHINESE GIRL WRITES PLAY 

Lucy Wong, an eleven-year-old Chinese 
girl who is a pupil in Public School No. 
23, has completed a playlet that is attract- 
ing favorable comment even outside of the 
Chinatown section. The play, "The En- 
chanted Garden," is the first by this young 
Oriental lady, the plot being more or less 
fantastic Prince Butterfly is expected to 
visit the garden to choose a queen and 
the flowers of the garden try to beautify 
themselves in preparation for the visiL 
The WHdrose, shy and shtmned by tiie 
others, b chosen by the Butterfly. 



Answers to Queries 



Rip — In the case of the drawn battle, ' 
all bets upon the result of a fight were 
drawn also, a special rule of the P. R. 
providing for this. 



M. R.— Frank C Bostock's Animal 
Arena was a feature at the Pan-American 
Exposition. 



Song — ^Jos. Morris published the Song 
"Things in the Bottom Drawer." M. 
Witmark published "Absence Makes the 
Heart Grow Fonder." 



C L— The "Old MSU" ride was origin- 
ally controlled by the Aquarama Co. of 
150 Nassau Street, New York. 



R. R.— The J. Pierpont Morgan Special 
on Feb. 7, 1902 made the 90.2 miles from 
Fbiladdphia to New York in 84.5 minutes, 
on the New Jersey Central R. R. 



Tyson — Judge Scott rendered the deci> 
sion iq>bolding Al Hayman & Co. of the 
Knickeitocker Theatre; New York in re- 
fusing to accept tickets sok. by a side- 
walk speculator. 



S. S.— Jas. W. Collier, of Shook and 
Collier, died at New York City, May 13, 
1898. 



G. & S. — "The Mikado" was produced 
for the first time in New York at the 
Union Square Theatre, July 20, 1885. 



Tom— Al W. Martin had two "Uncle 
Tom's Cabin" Cmipanies on the road in 
1902. Other companies were Stetson's 
(three), and Abbey's. ' 



L. D. — "The Last Appeal" was presented 
at Wallack's, New YoitTD. H. Harkins 
was in the opening i>erformaDce, hot broke 
down and was suc ceed ed by £dwin Brandt. 



A. H.— The Roberval French Opoa 
Companv filled an engagement at the Vic- 
toria Theatre, New York, with a reper- 
tory of light and comic opera. 



Bim — Col. Hugh Harrison had the priv- 
ileges with Walter L. Main's show. Ed 
C. Knupp was general agent 



P. S. — Abe Attell won a twenty-round 
txnit over Kid Broad at St. Louis, April 
10, 1902. 



TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO 

Phyllis Rankin was witfa the "Belle of 
New York Co." 

John L. Sullivan appeared at the head 

of liis Vaudeville Co. and in "A Trip 
.\cro3S the Ocean" played the captain of 
the steamship, at Boston, Mass. 

C^rge Shannan, of Mur^y and Shan- 
iian, died at the Post Graduate Hospital, 
New York. 

.\1 G. Field was made Exalted Ruler of 
the Columbus, Ohio, Lodge of Elks. 

Funeral services for Anton Sddl were 
held at the Metropolitan Opera House, 
New York. The body was cremated at 
Fresh Pond, L. I. 

Buffalo Bill's Wild West and Congress 
of Rough Riders of the World, opened at 
Madison Square (^den. New York. 

Adele Ritchie appeared as Suzanne in 
"Au Bain" at Koster and Beal's, New 
York. 

(tus Hogan was in advance of the Rose 
Hill Co. 

Frank C Ives delated Jacob Sdaefer 
at billiards, for the world's cfaanqnonship 
at Central Music HaO, CUcago. 

Ad^'s Lioos were playing the Orphean 
Orcmt. 

Van and Nobrig^ with tit eg "Kom eay 
Kooos/* were irith -RoUrfB ^Aohcn^Ukfta* 



Rialto Rattles 



HOW MANY MILES A GALLON? 

Newspaper headline reads, "Rve Wheel 
Babies in a 52-Mile Race." Evidently the 
offspring of a Ford and a Motorcycle. 



FRESH MILK AT LASTI 

Cow climbs stairs in Brooklyn and 
knocks at Man's door at I a. m., says the 
Herald. 



FISH SEASON ON 

"The fish are beginning to bite again. 
This does not refer to the Broadway vari- 
ety on which there is no closed season. 



RELEASED 

It gave the producer a laugh 

When a girl built just like a giiaugh 

Said her voice wasn't strong 

But that she should bdong 
Cause she had such a wonderful caugfa. 



AND NO CHORUS GIRLS I 

_Oat of 1,457 prisoners received at Sing 
Sing last year, statistics given out last 
week, show that there was but one actor 
and one acrobat. . 

Yet some people - say it's been a bad 
season. 



HANGING O'ER HEAD 

The rookie pitchers who are passing 
four balls too onen, will. soon stop at three. 



BUT NO BROADlCASTING 

"Some people," says Will Aheam. "are 
so dumb, they think N. V. A. is a radio 
station." 



GET YOUR OUUA 

Now that Sir .-Arthur Conan Doyle baa 
returned we can expect all the old spirit 
jokes to return to earth with the acton 
as mediums. 



HOMELIEST AFTER ALL 

John — Your trip must have been a won- 
der, ril bet yon saw tome queer-lotAiiiK 
people. 

Saiab— Yes, but after all there's no 
place like home. 



A REAL COURT DECISION 

A western jtidge in. a divorce and coun- 
ter divorce case brought by the heads of 
the S. N. Ades fomily, ^ve out the fol- 
lowing order in connecticui with his de- 
dsinn. "Yon may sleep at your home, hot 
that is all. Yon cannot eat liiere and job 
must not speak to your wife. You 
to all of yoor three children, Imt dKMiId 
a qocstioa regarding their wdCare arise 
you must consult your wife throt^gh a 
-AIrd person. 



A CELEBRATION 

Carrie — ^Two weeks ago I refusal to 

many Freddie, and he has been drhildns 
heavily ever since. 

Mary — Yet, that's always the way witli 
him. He never knows wlien to stop a 
celebration. 



WHERE THEY NEVER ME 

"Have you ever written anything that 
will live?" asked the emotional young 
woman. 

"Sure I have," said the {irofessiaaal 
humorist.^ "Some of my old jokes taav« 
found their way to the vaudeville stagey and 
will never die." 



DURING "NA-nONALITY WEEK" 

While Luther Gobd, manager of Keith's 
Colonial, was standing in the lobby of h!i 
theatre, he was approached hs a til^ 
heavily built cliap^ wtao must have bem at 
least six feet high in his «m«tingT 

*<I hear you're setma nm «n ^in«i»n. 
eootett here," he slated to GebeL "What 
can yon do}* aAed the manager. 

do a wouJtif nl M"tfm^ mooiriogiK^ 
and a narvclutu hnitelioB of ^Ebr^ x^ao— 
der— if too grre me time to get mf hladc- 
face off.^ 



14 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 11, 1923 




"CINDERS," NEW ROYCE 
MUSICAL COMEDY, 

IS TUNEFUL 



"CINDEKS," a musical comedy m two 
Acts. Hook aad lyrta b, Edmrk Oaik, 
m.iuic by Rndoipb Frinil. Produced ai 
the Dresden Thatre, Tuoday evening, 
April 4. 

CAST 

Tinir Olien Qoeaie Smith 

Slim Kelly Fred HiUebiud 

Cinders Nancy Wclford 

John Winthrop W. Dooglas Stcrenson 

Urm. Horatic WinthiDp.... Margaret Dale 

Major Drummond '.John H. Bretfcr 

Mr. DdanecT Hort Roberta Bcatty 

GcnldlnCr Macy Lticaa 

Bntlcr TliGlllas Fitzpatrick 

Great Scott Ceoise Baocioft 

Miss Breckenridge Lillian Lee 

Mm& Dural Edith Campbell-Walker 

Tottie Kitty Kdly 

Lottie Eatdle Lerelle 

HortenK Alia King 

AmubcUe Diana Stegman 

Ualhilde .Dagmar Oakland 

Jnlie Erdyn Darrille 

Ymte Elaine Ghokon 

Ninette Eden Gny 

Cecelia Vera de Wolfe 

Simcne I^uise Uateman 



"THE CROOKED SQUAKE" CLOSING 

Sam Shipman's play "The Crooked 
Square" _ which Mrs. Henry B. Harris is 
now presenting at the Prmcess Theatre, 
Chicago, will conclude its engagement at 
that house on Saturday and close for the 
season. With its present cast headed by 
Constance Binncy the play is scheduled to 
open at the Hudson Theatre oa Labor 
.JDay, providing that George M.' Cohan's 
"So This Is London" vacates the theatre 
by that time. 

MARWICK BACK WITH "ELSIE" 

Irene Marwick who placed the title 
role in John Jay Scholl's "Elsie" on tour 
resumed her place in the cast at the 
Vanderbilt Theatre last Wednesday night 
'She replaced Margaret Zender who 
originally took her place for the New 
York run of the play. 



The problem as to what to do with the 
former home of Ziegfeld's "Midnite Frolic" 
has been -saccessfully solved and a finely 

.buHt theatre^ now called the Dresden, oc- 
cupies the former roof garden of the New 
Amsterdam. 

"Cinders/' the first production to be put 
on at the new house is Edward Royce's 
second ptodutti on, a finely staged, beau- 
tifully , costumed musical comedy with a 
score by Rtidolph Friml which is brimful 
of pleasing melodies, channingly orches- 
trated asd sung by a cast whicn while far 
from being strong vocally at least have 
the ability to handle Ae English language 

.in a 'way which permits the audience to 

' know wbat the lyrics are about 

The story, of the Cinderella type, tells 
of a poor kttli shop girl, .who, told to de- 
liver a gown to one of the store's customers 
that wanted to attend a dance that night, 
fails to do so and having the gown on her 

'{lands decides to wear it and attend the 
ballherseli 
Her appearaoce at the affair is a big 

'Success and John Winthrop, son of the 
hostess falls in love 'with her. One of 
the features of the affair is the appearance 
of a magician who with his partner plans 
to take^ and hide the jewels of several of 
die guests and then at the dramatic mo- 

mtnt rettim diem. He hides than in a 
flowerpot but the shop girl hiding in the 
room sees him and believing him to be 
a thief takes them. The discovery of the 
loss of the jewels, the disappearance of 
the girl in the confusion, the return of the 
iewds sewed in the_ gown -which is de- 
livered the next day, its return by the pur- 
chaser on account of the late deliveiy and 
faer frantic seardi for it when she learns 
of the jewels furnishes tiie story and some 
comedy situations, too thin and far apart 
to satisfy. 

Nancy Welford, dattghter of the come- 
dian Dallas Welford, is the new star, and 
although a short appearance in vauilt^lle, 
a comparitively small part in "Orange 
Btoasoms" covers her stage experience,_she 
did' some remarkably fine work. She sings 
pleasingly, is of fine appearance and has a 
rwaniwT ' of simplicity and diarm that is 
ddightfol. 

Fred Hillebrand is responsible for most 
of the lau^s in the piece 'which icome too 
sddom due to the hnes rather than any 
' lade on his jpart. 

Qneone Smkh. former ballet dancer, is 
now a full-fledf^ed doniedienne . and does 
'-with a part whidi gives lier bx too few 
owui lun Stiea tor she is really idever. 
' Uaigaiet Dale is excellent ' and oAeia 
■iii die' cast (Ed irdL A 'review of the 
'■how woold not'be eatinletfe 'Wid^bnt ihen- 
tlaa of VidDr ^ Batav alB." w<iq direcla .^e 
Qf^hcstza sod fiimidics a nmsical tteaf 



WOODS TO DO "THE MISSION" 

Al. H. Woods has accepted a new play, 
"The Mission," from Ethelbert Jones, its 
author, and will be^ casting this week 
for a production of it late in April. The 
play is said to be along the line of Chan- 
nmg Pollock's "The Fool." 



"DICE OF THE GODS," 
WITH MRS. FISKE, 
IS REAL THRILLER 



"THE DICE OF THE GODS," a jJay 
in tfarce acta, by Ullian Barrett, starring 
HriL Fiske and piuented by H. H. Frazee 
at the National Theatre, April S. 

CAST 

John Henderaon Donald Carasoa 

Budanan Laurence Harry Sttibbs 

Koger Canby. ., Robert Strange 

Dr. Boiry Arnold Joseph Macaulay 

Faracns. . Roy Cochrane 

Charles \ Francia Sadller 

Gioaeppi Alfano France Bcndtscn 

Mr. ScUiTan WiUiam T. Clark 

Michele Rodolfo Badaloni 

Pasquale Virginia Smith ; 

GioTaoni WiUiam Lambert 

Salvatore Frederick Scott 

Patricia Baird ("Faddy") lira. Fiske 

Charlotte Baiid Emita Lucelles 

Dolly I.aurence Ilden Jackson 

Suzanne ................ .Qdia Benjamin 

Ell^e Evelyn Orton 

Mary UcCafferty Maggie Weston 

Francesca Enntce 0:ibome 

Maria Caterina Banme 

Beatrice Henrietta Jordan 

Lucia ..Nera Badalcni 



Throu^ all die weak spots and the drali- 
ness of "The I>'ce of the Gods" the fine 
acting of Mrs. Fiske stands out as a thing 
of b^uty, a perfect bit of histrionic work. 
She plays the uncomfortable role of Patri- 
cia Paddy" Baird, formerly a Warren 
of Warrenton, Virginia, one of the War- 
rens, She becomes addicted to morphine 
and drags herself and those afbout her 
down from afiBiience and position to the 
very dregs. She schemes and lies and 
steals to^ get monev for the drug but does 
it all with such cnatming -wit and gaiety 
ttiat those who know her love her. It is 
remarlcafble to see her keep the love and 
respect of the Italian peasant folk who 
serve her. while stealing from them and 
the audience is put in quite the same mood 
as her servants. Finally, realizing that she 
has reached the end of her rope and that 
she is only in the 'way, she takes an over- 
dose of morphine, contriving to make it 
look nnlike suicide, pulls the blanket over 
her fece and dies. A happy ending be- 
tween the daughter and her artist love is 
tadced on as a sop to the andiences who 
'irant tliat sort of thing but it is really un- 
necessary and spoils the. effect of the play 
as '"Faddy" has enlisted the sympathies of 
.the audience from the start 

The play is well produced and .capably 
faaiidled, the best w;ork outside of the 
sap^i^ V e if o iu i lu ice of. Mrs, Jlske, being 
doocf by^jtirry SttJblii aiid Ertuta LdsiCdles. 



"ELSIE" TUNEFUL 
MUSICAL COMEDY 

AT VANDERBILT 



"ELSIE" a musical 'comedy in three 
acts by Charles W. Bell with rouaie and 
lyrics by Carlo and Sanders and Sissle and 
Blake, suced by Edgar MacGregor with 
dances by Walter Brooks and Bert French, 
and presented at the Vanderbilt Tbealre 
by John Jay School, April 2, 1923. 

CAST 

Margery Hammond '. ..Luella Gear 

Fred Blakely Sunley Ridges 

Anne Westford Ada Meade 

.^IGe Westford John Arthur 

Mrs. PbiJip Hammond 

Maude Turner Gordon 

Philip Hammond Frederic Burt 

Elsie Marguerite Zender 

Irma Irma Marwick 

Harry Hammond Vinton Freedley 

Parker William Cameron 

Julie Opal Hixson 

Vivienne Nell Ames 

Maureen Elyne 'Vselle 

Esme Helen Doty 



"Elsie" is a light show, with a bubble 
plot, frothy costumes and gentle comedy. 
Although "Elsie" is the leading lady in the 
play, an ex-musical comedy leading lady 
at that, it is to Luella Gear and Stanley 
Ridges that the principal honors go. Most 
of these honors are piled up in a song 
"Bab^ Buntinp;" that in itself is nothing, 
bitt IS made into something quaint cute, 
charming and altogether remarkable by the 
verve, zest and interpretation these two 
performers give it To our mind "Baby 
Bunting" is fifty per cent of the show: 

Of course the author has given "Elsie" 
a plot Not enough of a plot it is true, to 
keep it out of the musical comedy class, 
but a plot nevertheless. Harry Hammond, 
the lily of the exclusive Hammond family, 
eloped with "Elsie," a musical comedy fa- 
vorite, his proud parents learning of the 
catastroi>he through the dailies. The en- 
tire family are furious. Harry unwisely 
brings the wife home. The family vow to 
get rid of her and Fred Blakely, fiance of 
Marger>- Hammond, tells them the best 
way to do this is to keep her with them, 
surround her -with men, and send 'Harry 
away, trusting to the call of the stage to 
make her kick over the traces and get a 
divorce. The plan fails inasmuch as all 
the men of the household, from the austere 
Hammond to the gay Blakely and hen- 
pecked Alfie Westford fall for "Elsie" like 
a ton of bricks, and making the female 
contingent anxious to get rid of her even 
to the extent of countenancing her mar- 
riage to Harry. Of course it works out 
all right in the third act and the curtain 
goes down on a hapiry family with the 
chorus girl friends of "Elsie" draping 
themselves over the. furniture of the Ham- 
mond home just as if they didn't know 
that the chorus girls don't hang around 
much 'with the female prindpals off-stage. 

Maude Turner Gordon works well in the 
part of Mrs. Philip Hammond and Frederic 
Burt does well with the part of her hus- 
band. Marguerite Zender, as "Elsie" has 
what is known as a "cnte" part, but man- 
ages to sing nicely, and Vmton Freedley 
plays Harry Hammond in correct music^ 
comedy style. But Luella Gar, somdiow 
reminiscent of Qiarlotte Greoiwood, but 
but a good deal of originality, walks away 
-with' the show, ably assisted and abetted 
by Stanley Ridges. Layman and Kling do 
a fine whirlwind dance but the choriis 
work is neat but negligible. 

Outside of "Baby Bunting" the songs we 
liked best 'were "Honeymoon Home," 
"Two Lips Are Roses," and "One Day in 
May." There are sixteen musical numbers 
in all, most of them tuneful but none of 
them "different" 



DREW ASSISTING IN DIRECTING 

John Drew was called in by Augustus 
Thomas, executive secretary of the Pro- 
ducing Managers' Association, on Monday 
' to assist Robert Milton in the directing and 
staging of "As You Like It," the first of- 
fering of the National American Theatre, 
which is being sponsored by the Produc- 
ing Managers' Association. 



"IF WINTER COMES," 
FAMOUS NOVEL, MAKES 
ENTERTAINING SHOW 



"IF WI.NTER COMES." by A. M. S. 
Hutchinson ;ind D. McDonald Hastings, 
produced at (he Gaiety Theatre by Charles 
Dillingham, on Monday evening, AprQ .2.* 

CAST 

Mrs. Sabre Mable Tcrry-Lcwia 

Rebecca Jinks Gladys Burgess 

Major Millet Eclilin Gayer 

I^er. Sebastian Fortune .... Henry Morrell 

Mr. Twyninf* Edgar Kerns 

Mark Sabre Cyril Maude 

Harrold Twyning B.'^yd Clark 

Eftie Bright Peggy Rush 

Mr. Briebt Edmund Gumey 

Lady Tybar Lydia Bilbrooke 

Sarah Jinks Audrey Cameron 

A Coroner F. Gatenby Bdl 

A Solicitor Herbert Ranson 

A Chemist George Tawde 

Coroner's Officer Frank Howoon 

A Girl Clerk Eva McRoberta 



Oakea and De Lear joined the cast 
of "Minnie and Me," starring Mitzi, in 
Stamford last week. 



Cyril iMaude, undoubtedly best remem- 
bered by American audiences for his 
"Grumpy" of a past decade, was restored 
to the metropolitan "boards" at the Gaiety 
Theatre last Monday evening as the central 
character of "If Winter Comes," a dra- 
matization of the widely read novel. From 
the outset it may well be said that Maude's 
portrait of Mark Sabre is effectual and 
will do more to restore the finlshtxt star 
■to the high esteem of the better class of 
American playgoers precipitated by his 
rcrnarkable "Grumpy." 

A dissertation or comi»rison of Maude 
in both roles is quite inviting and tempting, 
but as it would consume much space, we 
shall pass on to the merits of the latter 
performance. 

In adapting the story for the stage much 
of the novel has been dispensed with and 
in several instances the homely touches 
have given way to situations purdy the- 
atrical. Nevertheless, the play makes great 
entertainment and should enjoy a popular 
vogue. 

It begins just after Mark Sabre enlists 
for battle and represents him in his sun- 
nier mood. It entirely obliterates any sug- 
' question of the namby-pamby Samaritan 
with a penchant for bungling affairs, but 
rather puts him forth as a jovial old scout 
ha'ving a jolly time of it while serving his 
crown and country. 

Later he is revealed within the home 
circle as the protector of a young woman 
who has loved too well. His interest is 
misconstrued by the wife, who is backed 
up by the father of the girl, in suspecting 
that Sabre is the man in the case. After 
a succession of turbulent scenes the wife 
leaves him. He is broken and bowed, yet 
determined to offer shelter to the young 
womaiL The latter appreciating his posi- 
tion embraces suicide to solve the pr<A>lem. 
But instead, he is accused of the crime. 

However, everything is ironed out be- 
fore the final curtain. The identity of 
the betrayer is made known, but shielded 
by Sabre inasmuch as tiie youth gave his 
life to his flag on the battlefield His wife 
returns and sees him in a new light The 
curtain descoids with both planning a 
bright future with each other, 

Cyril Maude's performance of Sabre 'was 
superb. Others who acquitted themselves 
admirably 'well were Mabel Terry-Lewis, 
Peggy Rush, Boyd dark and Echlin 
Gayer. 



April 11, 1923 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



IS 



Ryan and Inness are now playing the 
Keith Canadian time. 



. Grace Edler and her revue opened in 
New York last week. 



Harry Downing opened for a repeat 
tour of the Pantages Circuit last week. 

■ Carroll and Gorman have re-united 
and will open on the Foil time shortly. 



Pat Moriarty arrived in New York 
last week after touring the Middle West. 



' Cardo and Noll opened in the South 
last week for a tour of the Loew Cir- 
cuit. 



Arthur Shields is back in New York, 
having completed a tour of the Pantages 
.Circuit. 



Frank and Kthel Caimca are mourn- 
ing the loss of their mother who died 
last week. 



Olive Hill has been engaged to ap- 
pear in. a Chicago cabaret revue' for 
four weeks. 



Maty Brandon Kline and Sammy Jr., 

will sail April 14 on the Homeric for a 
pleasure tour. 

Wyrley Byrch has been signed for the 
Dayton Stock Company which opens 
next week. 



Mnlroy, McNeece and Sidee have 
joined the cast of - Irene Castle s Fash- 
ion Show. 



Tommy Gordon is to be seen in the 
juvenile role of a Broadway produc- 
tion shortly. 



Taylor, Macy and Hawks are playing 
the first run motion picture houses in 
the Middle West. 



Shep Waldman will be seen in a new 
act . shortly, his brother Ted having re- 
joined Eva Tanguay. 

Challls and Lambert are now appear- 
ing at the Pekin Cafe, in Philadelphia, 
where they are featured. 



Bert Gordon and Gene Ford have 
combined their act again, after being 
split for several weeks. 



Eddie Russell has been engaged for 
"The Rise of Rosie O'Reilly," the new 
George M. Cohan show. 



Solly Joyce, Fred Hayden and Jack 
Holt have combined in a new act called 
"The Three Senators." 



Sophie Miller, songstress, opened 
vinth the new revue at the Moulin 
Rouge, Chicago, last week. 



Bud Bernie will open with an or- 
chestra this week, presented under the 
direction of his brother Ben. 



ABOUT TOU! AND TOU!! AND TOU!!! 



Collette Blein has been added to the 
cast of the vaudeville act, "Shadows," 
having joined it at the Jefferson this 
week. . 



Hoffman Sisters, formerly of vaude- 
ville, have been added to Harry Walk- 
er's Revue at the Beaux Arts, Atlantic 
City. 

Dave Thnrsdy will sail for England 
on May 15th, by which time he will 
have completed a tour of the Loew Cir- 
cuit, 



Florence Vexdon is appearing in Gor- 
don Walton's new production act, which 
has been routed over the Loew time. 



Lnolle Monroe is reviving her former 
"Cranberries" vehicle, and has already 
engaged Ed Race as a member of the 
cast 



Maijorie Logan has replaced Helen 
.Devlin in the linginue role of "Green- 
wich Village Scandals," now in re- 
' hearsal. ■ 



Thomas Butler and Frances Atwell, 

both attached to B. S. Moss's Franklin 
Theatre staff, were married last Monday, 
April 3. 



May Yohe gave a luncheon party at 
the National Vaudeville Artists Club 
last week in .honor of her return to 
vaudeville. 



Billy Arnold is preparing a new spring 
edition of "So This Is Paris," for the 
Moulin Rouge, New York. It will open 
in two weeks. 



Thelma Carleton has just closed a 
four weeks' engagement at the Palais 
Royal, Buffalo, where she was booked 
by Billy Curtis. \ 

Noodles -Fagan has recovered from 
the bronchial attack which kept him 
confined to his bed in San Francisco 
for three weeks. 



Arthur Houston has been signed for 
a prominent role in "The Lure," which' 
is being revived for the road. 

Eddie O'RooHce and Dan Downing 
have been routed over the Pantaget 
Circuit and will open on Aprif 9th. 

Ann Robinson has joined the cast of 
"Go-Go," the John Cort musical show 
at Daly's Sixty-third Street Theatre. 



Hairy L. Cooper, who is assisted in 
his act by Rae Chandler and Fred 
Picker has been routed over the Keith 
New England time. 



Abe Biin, Eastern press representa- 
tive for the Orpheum Circuit, was con- 
fined to his home with an attack of 
grippe last week. 



Marion' Sunshine has been engaged 
for the cast of "Lily of the Valley," 
which Arthur Hammerstein will place 
in rehearsal July 26. 



Mildred HoUiday, the Stewart Sisters 
and Andre and Armande have been 
added to Harry Walker's unit at Bon- 
giovanni's, Pittsburgh. 



The Marvelous Millers - have Just 
closed a four weeks' engagement at the 
Nixon Cafe, Pittsburgh, where they 
were booked by Billy Curtis. 

Helen Devlin has withdrawn from 
the cast of "Greenwich Village Scan- 
dals" and is planning to return to vaude- 
ville in a new production act 



Abe Levy, general manager for the' 
Sam H. ' Hams interests returned last 
week from an eleven-week sojourn at 
Palm Springs, Cal., where he went for 
recuperation purposes. 



Corinne Mner, formerly in vaudeville 
with Frank Gillen, is preparing a new 
singing act which she will do as a 
single, opening in a week or two. 



Lew Fitzgibbons, brother of Bert, and 
Joe Daniels, actor and coliminist, have 
written a new song called "Why Must 
My Pal Grow Old?" which is being 
featured by several acts. 



Johnny Collins, Keith booker, and 
assistant to W. Dayton Wegerarth, was 
confined to his home for several days 
last week with an attack of "flu." 



Whitford Kane has succeeded Louis 
Calvert in "R. U. R.," which Hairy 
Frazee has taken over from the Theatre 
Guild and is now offering on tour. 



'Victor Saville, pre'sident of the Sa- 
ville Producing Company of England 
was in New York last week to pur- 
chase moving picture stars for his com- 
pany's next production. 



Dora Dnby, whose dancing has pro- 
vided the necessary "kick" for more 
than one vaudeville "flash," is now the 
featured dancer in the revue at the 
Beaux Arts, Philadelphia. 



"Babe** Nasworthy has closed an en- 

figement of twenty' weeks at the 
eaux Arts, New York, and has opened 
with the Harry Walker unit at the 
Richmond, Richmond, Va. 

May Hendetson and Kuby Kramer 
have fonned a vaudeville alliance and 
are rehearsinj^ a new act, entitled "The 
Tryout," which they will shortly re- 
veal in the Proctor houses. 



Eula Condon, wife of Glenn Condon, 
editor of the Vaudeville News, returned 
to New York after visiting her folks in 
Oklahoma for the past few months. 

Shdla Teiry and her husband, Roy 
Sedley, will begin a tour of the Keith 
eastern houses in their little produc- 
tion, "May and December," this week. 

Billy- Koad is assembling a new revue 
for The Mill, Greenwich Village. . The 
piece is called "Good Times" and wOI 
be mterpreted. by six principals and °a ' 
cherns pf_twelye srirls...' . _^ 



week at the Little Church Aronnd the 
Comer. Both are appearing in the pic- 
ture "Down to the Sea in Ships." 

Lynne Overman and Le Roy Clcm- 
mens have completed a new comedy, 
"After the Rain," which is to be tried 
out by the Marshall Players at the 
Lyceum Theatre, Baltimore, next month. 

Remo, who closed last weeic in "The 
Dancing Girl" at the Winter. Garden, 
and Mary Washburn, are rehearsing; a 
new sinnng act for vaudeville in which 
they wirr open on the Keith time shortly. 
The act is being staged in nolvelty style. 

Murray Bennett has replaced '-Tom 
Douglas in the Lewis and Gordon 
vaudeville act, "When Love Is Young," 
the latter having departed for London 
to play the title role in the London 
production of "Merton of the Movies." 

Rose Addle, who has been appearing 
in the Willard Mack playlet, "The Bear 
Cat," being presented in vaudeville by 
Fred C Hagan and Company, fell and 
broke her arm last week and- is con- 
fined to iier room in the Hotel JudsoOL 



William Fox and Jack W. Loeb, his 

biisiness' associate and general manager 
of . the Fox Vaudeville Bookini^ ofi&ces, 
returned from a six weeks' sojourn at 
Augusta, Georgia, last Monday. 

Benny Leonard, champion light- 
weight who has left the cast of "The 
Dancing Girl," iat- the Winter Garden 
is next season to s'tar in a pugilistic 
comedy< drama called "The Champ." 



Bessie Banriscale has interrupted her 
vaudeville tour to begin rehearsals for 
a new comedy, without title, by Howard 
Hickman. The piece will have a pre- 
liminary Spring , showing in New Or- 
leans. 



Arthur Byron .has been added to the 
cast which will appear in support of 
Irene Fenwick in "Chivalry," which is 
being produced by Joseph Shea and 
which is scheduled to open in Atlantic 
City, April 23. 



Arvid Paulson will shortly be seen in 
"The. Law of Love," an American 
.translation of the Swedish play, "A 
Mother," which is to be done for a 
series of matinee performances at the 
Morosco Theatre. 



Elizabeth Brown and Paul Yocmn. 
have supplanted Cortez and Peggy in 
the dance episode of "The Masked 
Woman," now on tour, the latter pre- 
ferring to remain in town with "Wild- 
flower," at the Casino. 



Grace Anderson, who has been iden- 
tified with a number of successful mo- 
tion picture enterprises, has joined 
forces with Chamberlain Brown and 
will handle all of the motion picture 
casting out of that office. 

Wmiam Faveraham is busying him- 
self with the completion . of plans for 
several productions he is to make next 
season. He has opened a New York 
. ofiice and has engaged Edward Vroom 
as his general manager. 

Flank S. Richardson has been ap- 
pointed auditor for the Melboume-Ar- 
den Productions, Inc. Richardson has 
been connected with the stage 'for ^sev- 
eral years bnt never in the business 
branch of the profession. 



Eldoa. Raymond McKee^ known in 
.pictures as' Raionbnd McKee, and: Miss 
Mar^erite. C^vrtot were married. laM- 



Grace .Arlington, who appeared on 
tour in . the prima donna role . of the 
musical play, "Little Miss Daisy," has 
effected an arrangement whereby she 
has acquired the rights of the piece 
and will condense it Tor vaudeville pur- 
poses. 



James D. Barton,, who exchanges 
American artists for Oriental artists 
and vice versa, has- jiist returned from 
the Orient with a' group of playlets. 
The playlets will ■. .be adapted - and 
offered here for a series of special 
matinees. 



Alexander Omnanifar has been ibaned 
by Messmore Kendall . of the Capitol 
Theatre to the -American National 
Theatre for the purpose of staging the 
dances in "As Yon %Skt It, which 
opens .at Poll's TUea&Q,' Washington 
next Monday. * 

Frank Martens retLmed from Easton, 
Pa., last week and .was more than 
sangnine over th'e prospects, of his new 
play, "Gabette." wnich jnade its initial 
bow there last Monday night Martens 
wrote the piece in ..collaboration with 
Sidney Lazarus. 

Walter Brooks, who staged the dances 
in "Go-Go" and "Elsie," has been se- 
lected to stage the numbers for "My 
Gal Sal," a summer .song show an- 
nounced for next month by the Mel- 
boume-Arden Productions, Inc. He is 
now at work on "How Come." 



Edward Jnstns Mayer has resigned 
the position of general publicity rep- 
resentative for the Arthur Hopkins en- 
terprises to take over the publicity reina 
for Mack Hilliard, Inc. Dave Wallace, 
assistant to Mayer was promoted to his 
position in the Hopkins office. 

Hugh Grady, general manager of the 
Arthur Hammerstein attractions, who 
was recently operated upon at the 
Lenox Hill hospital , for an attack of 
appendicitis left the institution for At- 
lantic Cty last Friday, where he will 
spend the next fonr wedca recnperatingr. 

Margnerita Sylva. well known in ' 
musical comedy and the concert stage, 
is planning to return to Broadway next, 
season in a new comedy, with songs.' 
This will be Miss Sylva s first appear- 
ance on the_ legitimate stage in 'several 
months, daring which time she has been 
on a concert tour. 

H. M. Arden, iMnagiwy doector of 
the Melbonme-Arden Prometkms, Inc., 
spent the week-end htdiday in Atlantic 
City last week, dividing his time be- 
tween promenading the boardwalk and 
digesting the revised script of "In the 
Balancer which is t« be the first pro- 
duction 'ef ' the firm. He retaraea on 
Monday, and t>e(an sel^tinv the caat^ 



16 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 11. 1923 



A Positive Hit 



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April 11, 1923 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



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18 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 11. 1923 





COMPOSERS' SOCIETY PREPARES 
TO FILE SUI T AGAINS T RADIO CO. 

Test Case to Detennine Legal Rights of Muuc Cc^yriglit Ovmen 
to Collect Rojralties or Fees From Broadcasting 
Stations to be Filed This Wedc 



The looK-expected test suit looked for- 
waid to by both sides of the radio station 
license question may be started next week 
when the American Society of Composers, 
Anthers and Publiiihers ask for an in- 
junction restiaining one of the large local 
hotels and the largest broadcasting station 
in the. East from sending out music, the 
copyright of which is controlled by the 
society. The suits for injunction may 
possibly be started against the Hotd 
Pennsylvania, the Vincent Lopez ' Or- 
chestra playing there, and the Westing- 
house broadcasting station, WJZ, at 
Newark, New Jersey, through which 
medium the Lopez orchestra has been 
relaying and sending out mnsic belonging 
to tibe society. 

J. C Rosenthal, general manager of 
the A. S. C, A. & P.. has written to the 
hotel owners and Vincent Lopez, request- 
ing them to. refrain from broadcasting 
the society's music for profit, as the license 
issued to the hotel limited the playing of 
certain music in the hotel only. "Pro- 
miscuous broadcasting" said Mr. Rosen- 
thal "of the society's music must stop" 
is the edict and if the request in the letters 
is not complied with injunctions will be 
soo^t' to restrain the offenders. 

The concensus of opinion is that the 
average radio statioa wiU welcome the test 
case, as matters must come to a head 
sometime and free, broadcasted music can- 
not contintie forever. As it stands now. 
the radio stations are in the position of 
one giving something for nothing, in a 
way. and it most come to a halt sooner or 
later. 

That radio concerts are hurting com- 
posers. aoAors and publishers in many 
ways is without question, according to 
Mr. Rosenthal who quoted a recent state- 
ment sent out by a Chicago station to. 
the effect that ra^'o concerts were rapidly 
replaang pbonogiaphs and records. As 
a matter of fact, statistics compiled re- 



garding phongraph record sales in radio 
cities such as Detroit, Philadelphia and 
other places where wireless concerts are 
plentiful, show a decrease in record sales 
of 20 per cent since the radio craze has 
been in \ogue. 

The letter sent by the society to the 
Hotel Pennsylvania follows : "The West- 
inghouse Electric & Manufacturing Com- 
pany, holds no license from this Society 
to broadcast copyrighted music belong- 
ing to our members. 

"We note that the program for Tues-< 
day, A'prW 3, 1923, at 7:30 p. m., in- 
cluded 'Dance Music,' rendered by the 
Vincent Lopez Redcap Orchestra, and we 
are informed the music is performed at 
your hotel and by arrangement with the 
Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing 
Company to broadcast through their sta- 
tion. 

"The license granted to your establish- 
ment to your hotel and we hereby notify 
yon that any arrangement whereby the 
composition of our members are broad- 
casted from yonr hotel, must be termi- 
nated at once." 

The above communication is signed by 
J C. Rosenthal as general manager of 
the A. S. C, A. & P., as well as the fol- 
lowing letter sent to Vincent Lopez : "En- 
closed herewith you will find copy_ of a 
comniunicition which we have this day 
forwarded to the Hotel Pennsylvania 
relative to the broadcasting of copyrighted 
musical compositions through the West- 
inghouse Electric & Manufacturing Com- 
pany. 

"You will also find a list of the mem- 
bers of this Society whose works are re- 
stricted against public performance for 
profit, at or by any broadcasting station 
v.-hich does not secure our license. 
"If you will telephone our office upon 
, receipt of this communication, I will be 
* pleased to explain to you in detail the 
position of this society." 



FEBT GIVES WRITERS SI.OOO 

Leo Feist donated $1,000 to The Song- 
writers, the organiration formerly called 
the Composers and Lyric Writers League, 
the money to go toward the -erection of 
the proposed $100,000 dubhonse to be 
used as a home^ etc. for song writers. 

Amiotmcement of the donation was made 
at the weddv set toscther affair of The 
Songwriters held at Keene's Chop House 
every Wednesday evening. A committee is 
arranging a series of benefit performances 
in order to raise the money needed for the 
doUiouse. 



PEASE DIVORCE SUITS DISMISSQ> 

White Plajns, April 9. — Supreme 
Court Justice Morschaoser dismissed last 
week a snit .and comiter suit for divorce 
biuughl respectively by Mrs. Louise Pease, 
of xoolcers, and Harry Pease, her hns- 
tand. Hie songwriter. 

Tbe Judge m dismissing the suits said 
that tbe tiuth of the charges on each side 
was obscured. The Pease case has been 
in die oouts for nearly a year. Each 
duig e d tfie other with infidelity. 



RADIO TO BAR COPYRIGHTED TUNES 

The Radio Corporation of America and 
the Westinghouse Electric and Manufac- 
turing Company Issued a statement on 
Monday night that because of the objection 
raised by an organization representing au- 
thors and publishers of copyrighted mnsic, 
all such music will hereafter be eliminated 
from> the programs of the WJZ radio 
broadcasting station in Newark, operated 
by these two companies. 

The statement points out that although 
the station gives free performances and 
makes no charge to the vocal and instru- 
mental artists who participate in thc_ pro- 
grams, conditions under which permission 
to use copyrighted music coald be obtained 
would involve a considerable addition to 
the heavy expense under which the station 
is operated. Therefore the copyrighted 
music will t>e eliminated, but the station 
says that it will continue its broadcasting 
activities as heretofore, devising the best 
programs possible. 



GRAFF AND GRANT WRITING SHOW 

Geo. Graff, Jr.. and Bert Grant are col- 
laborating on the book lyrics and mnsic 
of a nenr iiinistcal comedy which they ex- 
pect;fD Inve* ready 'in "tiDfe .for production 
thit . sunnu e i-. '. ^ The Woilc Is being dpoe - 
alooy. jHjtiiutfe . * -:- ■;■ 



PUBUSHINC MUSIC IN HOLLYWOOD 

Hollywood, Cat, now boasts of a popu- 
lar music publishing firm, the Veritas Pub- 
lishing Company, whose first publication is 
entitled "Just Like a Woman," which is 
making considerable headway on the Coast. 



A. J. STASNY IS DEAD 

A. J. Stasny, music publisher, died sud- 
denly at his home ui 'New York early 
Monday morning. Mr. Stasny had been iU 
but a short time, suffering first from influ- 
enza, from which he believed be had re- 
covered, and, going back to business, again 
was taken ill. The second attack was in- 
flamatory rheumatism, which confined him 
in the house for several days. He was re- 
covering rapidly, however, and on Satur- 
day believed he would be well enoue[h to 
return to business. He was taken with a 
severe heart attack on Monday morning, 
from which he did not recover. 

Mr. Stasny was well-known both in this 
country and abroad, having about two 
years ago, in addition to his New York 
publishing house, established offices in 
London. Mrs. Stasny is now in England 
in charge of the offices, while her late hus- 
band was back home in N'ew York. 

Mr. Stasny was well known throughout 
the entire industry, had a large acquaint- 
ance among writers, publishers and dealers 
the country over. He had a pleasing per- 
sonality, was well liked and had innumer- 
able friends. 



CLARKE AND LESLIE START 

Grant Clarke and Edgar Leslie, -who 
withdrew last week from Uie firm of Stark 
& Cowan, opened offices Monday in the 
Hilton Building under tlie name of Oarke 
& Leslie Songs, Inc. with Sidn^ Caine 
as general manager. They wilt engage in 
a general music publishing business. 

Other members of the staff include: 
Frank Marvin, head of the band and or- 
chestra department; Harry Warren, pro- 
fessional department, and others, among 
them being a professional manager whose 
name will be announced next week. 

The catalogue of the new concern for 
the present is composed of "Now That I 
Need You, You're Gone," by Clarke, Les- 
lie and Joseph Meyer, which will be the 
plug number, and "Page Paderewski," a 
novelty instrumental number by Pete 
Wendling, Joe Samuels and Larry Briers. 
A new come()y song by Clarke and Leslie 
will be put out shortly. 



NEW COMPOSERS' SOCIETY STARTS 

In order to further the production of 
modem music, a Society is bang incor- 
porated under the . name of "League of 
Composers." A series of concerts are 
planned for the season of 1923-1924 at the 
Klaw Theatre, devoted to the work of. 
modem composers of various nations. 

An executive committee of five compos- 
ers will handle the business for the League 
and tiie concerts given will be in a sub- 
scribers series. Lectures will be offered to 
subscribers by musicians, scholars and 
critics. _ The committee is composed of Leo 
Omstein, Gruenberg, Lazare . Saminiski, 
Emerson Whithome, and Arthur Bliss, the 
English composer who is coming to the 
United States for a prolonged stay. 

An advisory committee of composers.' 
musicians and lajmen is being formed by 
the board of directors. Affiliations have 
been estatblished with eminent musicians 
abroad who will facilitate the exchange of 
manuscripts and appear as guests at the 
concerts and lectures. 



WBAV TAKES OUT UCENSE 

' Emer & Hopkins, operators of radio 
broadcasting station WBAV, Columbus, 
Ohio, have taken out a license from the 
American Society of Composers, Authors 
and Publishers, the fee being $200 per year. 
This is the second station to take out a 
license, in each case music being used on 
the program being only incidental to the 
other subjects. 



"SWANEE MOON" SUIT DECIDED 

The United States Circuit Court of Ap- 
peals upheld the decision of the lower 
courts and denied the motion for a pre- 
liminary injunction asked for by Edward 
B. Marks, in his suit brought against Leo 
Feist, Inc., on the grounds that the song 
"Swanee River Moon" infringed upon a- 
composition entitled "Wedding Dance 
Waltz," copyrighted in 1905. Expert testi- 
mony proved that there- was no similarity 
in the two compositions if "Swanee River 
Moon" was played as written, the rhythm 
and accent being different, in the five or 
six bars alleged to constitute^ the infringe- 
ment. A musical composition entitled 
"Cora Waltz" was exhibited, published be- 
fore the Marks composition, which con- 
tained several bars of music similar to the 
latter, and Circuit Judges Hough, Rogers 
and Manton further decided that the use 
of six similar bars when used in a com- 
position of four hundred and fifty bars was 
permissible. 

The suit for infringement of copyright 
was brought by Edward B. Marks in 
March. 1922, in the United Sutes District 
Court, which refused to issue a preliminary 
injunction on the grounds of six bars of 
similarity being in the defendant's composi- 
tion, several months after "Swanee River 
Moon" had had considerable , success. The 
decision -written by Circuit Judge Manton 
follows in part: 

. . The appellant's composition 
comprises four hundred and fifty bars of 
music and he points out that six bars of 
this are infringed upon by the appellee's 
comparison. They are found in the 
chorus. The composer of 'Swanee River 
Moon' swears that he never knew of the 
composition entitled 'Wedding Dance 
Waltz' and never heard it played until 
October, 1922. Appellee has submitted 
another composition written and published 
long prior to. 'Wedding Dance Waltz' and 
that, too, has an entire identity in at least 
four bars which are found m both ap- 
pellant's and appellee's music . . . 

". . . ^ust establish that the appellee 
had actually copied or pirated the com- 
position, not merely while ignorant but 
after knowledge of the previous composi- 
tion. Musical signs available for combina- 
tions are about thirteen in number. They 
are tones produced by striking in succession 
white and black keys as they are found 
on the keyboard of the piano ... in a 
popular song . . . combinations of 
tones limited to the range of ordinary 
voice and skill of player. . . . Neces- 
sarily, within these limits, there will be 
found some similarity of tone succession. 

". . . some of the bars in the "Wed- 
ding Dance Waltz' arc duplicates of four 
bars of the 'Cora Waltz' published before 
appellant's composition. To constitute an 
infringement ... it would be neces- 
sary to find a substantial cop}nng of a 
substantial and material part of it. ' The 
ri^t granted ... by copyright ... . 
doe5_ not exclude the appellee from the use 
of six similar bars when used in a com- 
position of four hundred and fifty .bars." 

Francis Gilbert, of Gilbert & Gilbert, 
represented Leo Feist, Inc., and O. EUery 
Edwards was attorney for E. B. Marks. 



BARKER IS BOLLS BOSTON MGR. 

■ :BtUy Barker is now in charge of the. 
"Boston office of Jack MOIs, Inc. Teidacing ' 
.yjnoent^Marquise. ■' .l ' - ." Jj; 



NEW FEIST CINCINNATI OFFICE 

The Leo Feist, Inc. offices here have 
been moved from No. Ill East -Sixth street 
.to Nos. 707-708 Lyric Theater Buildmp. 



LETTER FINDS BETTY 

The fame of little Betty Gulick. the ten- 
year-old writer of "My Mother's Lullaby," 
published by the Triangle Music Publish- 
ing Company, has travel so far and so ex- 
tensively that a letter mailed to her from 
Denmark, bearing the address, "Miss Betty 
Gulick, U. S. A.," dated March IS. was 
delivered to her widiout the loss of a sin- 
gle day. The address was supplied by the 
post office, which had 110,000,000 people 
living in the United States to pick it out 
of. Evidently one of the clerics in the post 
office had read one of the many stories 
printed in the newspapers ^bout Betty. In 
fact, it was a story printed in tiie Danish 
lUustrateJ FamSy Joumat, in Denmark, 
which wis rtafoiaMt for Ae letter. 



April 11, 1923 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



19 




COL CIRCUIT 
CLOSES ON 
APRIL 16 



EXTRA TIME DATES GIVEN 



. The closing of all shows on the Col- 
umbia Circuit for the season 1922-1923 
is given below. This includes the extra 
time as well as the shows that close 
before the end of the regular season. 
The closing date of the regular season 
is the week of April 16th. 

The "Bon Tons" will take up the 
Reeves' Show time after Montreal. 

The extra time for this show will be 
the Columbia, New York, week of April 
23. 

Casino, Brooklyn, the week of April 
30 and Miner's Empire week of May 
7th. 

Sliding Billy Watson will have one 
week extra time, closing at the Gayety, 
Buffalo the week of April 23rd. 

Stone and Pillard will play the Em- 
pire Toledo the week of April 23rd, 
Gayety, Buffalo, the week of April 30th 
and Hurtig and Seamons, New York, 
the week of May 7th. 

"Chuckles" will pla>r the Gayety, De- 
troit, the week of April 23. 

The "Bowery Burlesquers" play the 
Star and Garter, Chicago, the week of 
April 23 and the Gayety, Detroit, week 
of April 30th. 

"Talk of the Town" plays the Colum- 
bia, Chicago, week of April 23, Star and 
■ Garter, Chicago, week of April 30th, 
Gayety, Detroit, week of May 7, and the 
Gayety, Buffalo, the week of May 14th. 

"Maids of America" will close at the 
Gayety, Kansas City, on Saturday night, 
April 28th. 

Motlie Williams Show will close at 
the Gayety, St. Louis, on Saturday 
night, April 28th. 

Harry Hastings' "Knick Knacks" lay 
off the week of April 23rd; play the 
Gayety, St. Louis, the week of April 
30th, Star and Garter, Chicago, the 
week of May 7th and the Gayety, De- 
troit, the week of May 14th, 

"Rockets" play the Olympic, Cincin- 
nati, the week of April 23rd, lay off 
the -week of April 30th and close at the 
Gayety, St. Louis, the week of May 7th. 

Dave Marion Show closes its regular 
season at the Colonial, Cleveland, the 
week of April 23rd. 

"Broadway Brevities" close at the 
Gayety, Pittsburgh, on Saturday night, 
April 28th. 

"Follies of the Day" play the Gay- 
ety, Washington, week of April 23, 
Gayety, Pittsburgh; week of April 30th 
and open for a Summer "run" at the 
Gayety, Boston, April .7th. 

The "Mimic World" play the Palace, 
Baltimore, week of April 23, the Gayety, 
Washington, the week of April 30, the 
Empire, Brooklyn, the week of May 
7th and Miner's Empire, Newark, the 
week of May 14. 

"Let's Go" play the Casino, Philadel- 
phia, the week of April 23rd, Palace, 
Baltimore, week of April 30th and the 
Gayety Washington week of May 7th. 

The "Big Jamboree" will close the 
week of April 23rd at the Empire, 
Brooklyn. 

Jimmy Cooper's Beauty Revue will 
play the Casino, Brooklyn, week of 
April 23 and will open at Waldron's 
Casino, Boston, the week of April 30th 
for a Summer "run." 

"Step on It" will play Miner's, Bronx, 
the week of April 23 and close at the 
Yorkville the week of April 30tli. 

The "FlashUghts of 1923" will play 
Waldron's Casmo the week of April 
iContiuud on page 25) 



COSTUME CONTRACT PLACED 

The costume contract for the Mutual 
Circuit next season was awarded to the 
Behrens Costuming Company last week. 
Bert Bernstein, representing the costum- 
ing company, closed the deal. This firm is 
to supply nine sets of costumes to each 
chorus girl of every show. It is not known 
at present just how many shows there will 
be on the circuit next season, but it is sup- 
posed that there will be in the neighbor- 
hood of thirty. 

In the contract it is stated that the cos- 
tuming company is to keep the costumes in 
.first-class condition during the season. 

HELEN GOULD CLOSES 

Helen Gould closed with Jack Reid's 
"Record Breakers" in Kansas City last 
Saturday night and left at once for Bos- 
ton where she will open this week with 
Billy K. Well's "Bubble Bubble" Com- 
pany, in place of Annctta Rose as sou- 
brette. Harry Rudder closed the deal. 



HOTEL CLERK DEAD 

Jimmy Cronin, for many years night 
clerk at the St. George Hotel, New York, 
died at his home in Brooklyn, March 30. 
He had been ill about three months. Cro- 
nin was well known to show people as the 
hotel has been a theatrical headquarters for 
years. 

"HEADS UP" FOR CHICAGO 

Morris and Bernard have completed ar- 
rangements to book their "Heads Up" 
company in Chicago for % run commenc- 
ing Jime IS. They are now negotiating 
to place "Step Along" with Julius & Max 
in a New York hoifse to open June 1. 

MARTY COLLINS' WIFE DEAD 

Louise Millar Collins, wife of Marty 
Collins, featured comedian of "Lets Go," 
died at Saranac Lake, Tuesday, March 27. 
She had been ill at this health resort since 
last September. She was twenty-four 
years of age at the time of her death. 



' BANK FOR WATSON BLDG. 

Paterson, N. J., April 7.— The National 
Bank of America has leased the comer 
store of the new Watson Building. Nearly 
all the offices in the building have now 
been leased, which will bring in a yearly 
rental of over $70,000. 



WELLS TO WRITE "BARNEY 
GOOGLE" 

Billy K. Wells will write the book for 
.the "Barney Google" show which is to be 
staged by Cain, Davenport, Bernstein and 
Hitchcock next season. 



FLAIG TO PRODUCE 

CiNClNNATT, Ohio, April 7. — Gus Flaig 
has been engaged to produce burlesque 
stock for the People's Theatre, this city, 
for Vail and McGrath. This house opens 
shortly with the new policy. 

DINNER FOR EDDIE SULLIVAN 

Eddie Sullivan, treasurer of the Olym- 
pic, New York, will be tendered a Beef 
Steak Dinner at Heidenberg Restaurant, 
next Tuesday night after the night per- 
formance. 



KELLY OUT OF SHOW 

Lew Kelly closed with the "Big Jam- 
boree" at Miner's Bronx, last Thursday 
on account of illness. Nat Mortan jimiped 
into the show that night doing his specialty. 



NEW PRODUCERS 
FOR COLUMBIA 
CIRCUIT 



CLARK & McCULLOUGH, LATEST 



Bobby Clark and Paul McCuUough are 
to produce a show on the Columbia Circuit 
next season, it was learned on good au- 
thority Monday. 

Qark and McCullough are now with the 
"Music Box" and they intend staying there, 
but, according to present arrangements, 
they will write and arrange a show, which 
they personally will produce and stage next 
August for the Columbia Circuit. 

Ill getting this firm as producers the (Co- 
lumbia people have scored a home run hit, 
in the opinion of those who know. In the 
past seasons, when in burlesque with the 
Jean Bedini Shows, Qark and McCullough 
have been a big success. This is not alone 
due to the fact that they were great come* 
dians thcmselve:), but the^ always had won- 
derful material, for which they were re- 
sponsible. They not alone wrote it, but 
they staged all the comedy scenes as well. 

They are now looking around -for' per- 
formers for the new show and have their 
eyes on two comedians who they think will 
just about fill the bill. 

It is not known now what franchise they 
will have, but it is understood that they 
will work on a percentage, with one of the 
present franchise holders who will not pro- 
duce his own show next season. 

Hmry Dixon will also have a Cblambia 
franchise next season. He has made_ ar- 
rangements to' operate the' Phil Sheridan 
franchise next season. This deal was com- 
.pleted last Thursday. 

Up to the present time franchises to 
change hands and to be operated by other 
producers next season are Barney Gerard, 
who will operate the Sam A. Scribner 
franchise running the season under the title 
of "Keep Smiling"; Eddie 'Daley, who 
takes over the omer Scribner franchise, 
now operating as "Big Jamboree"; Henry 
Dixon will have the Sheriden franchise, 
which George Jaffe, of Pittsburgh, oper- 
ated this season under the title of "Step 
Lively, Girls" ; Hughey Bernard will oper- 
ate the late James E. Coppers' franchise 
operated this season under the ittle of 
"Folly Town," and Qark and McCullough 
completes the list so far. 

CAST CHANGES IN "BUBBLE" 

Klara Hendrix, Anette Rose, principals, 
and Harry Rose, musical director, of Billy 
K. Wells' "Bubble Bubble" Company, will 
close with the show this week at the 
Gayety, Boston. Lucile Harrison opens 
Saturday night Jessie Rece opened with 
this show at the Gayety, in Montreal, last 
Friday. 

HUNTER PUTS OUT "TAB" 

Frankie Hunter, featured comedian 
with the "Big Jamboree", playing the 
Empire Brooklyn next week, has organ- 
ized a musical "tab" of fifteen people 
which will play week stands. Hunter will 
head the cast The "tab" will be known 
as Frank Hunter and his "Girls From 
Starland." 



DOUGLAS AND EARL IN ACT 

George Douglas and Leona Earl, who 
closed recently with the "Step Lively 
Girls" in Worcester opened this week on 
the Keith Time in their vaudeville act 



WESSON AND, EDWARDS IN ACT 

Oias. Wesson and Alice Edwards, who 
•are bov with the "Big- Jamboree."- will 
open in vaudeville on the Ddmai: time at 
>IorfoI1c April 30. 



"TOWN FOLLIES" CLOSING 

"Town Follies", played Hamilton. C, 
' Stmday and are booked to play Lima Uie 
Jast halfi-oi-ithe .wedc where -th^- will- 
dose their season. 



"RADIO CURLS" AT THE 
COLUMBIA IS FAST, 
BRIGHT AND CLEVER 

Another ex-American Circuit producer has 
made good on the Columbia Circuit. This time 
it is none other than that old time showman 
Sim Williams, who has ffiven the patrons of the 
his circuit one of the daasicst and best novelty 
shows that has been at the Columbia this aeason. 

Williams calls his show the "Radio Girls** and 
is feacurinc Billy Gilbert. The book the pro- 
ffiamme states is by Tom Howard, special mnatc 
by Ilughy Shubcrt, the numbers were staged 
by Solly Fields and 'the clecUical effects by 
Mayer Ilarris. 

The scenic )>r<HlQCtion and electrical effects 
are. out of the ordinary. The costumes are 
gorgeous, both those of the principles and thoae 
wont by the , chorus girls, not alone are they 
striking in design and color effects hat they 
look like new and its almost the end of the 
season. One would rslly think that the shcnr 
was just opening instead of it being so late in 
the scaMD, to look at the costumes, this also 
applies to the scenery. The musical part of the 
programjie is most tnnefuL 

Billy Gilbert and Bobby Wilson arc the fnn 
makers and th«y are. both comedians of no mean 
ability. Gilbert, a big good natured looking chap 
IS a natural comedian. He needs no makeup to 
make him fanny and he is using bat a little* 
WDson a clever tramp oomcdiaa is cartrcmdy 
amusing. He handles hts comedy situations in 
fine form. He is using a light make-Up thU 
sason. Wilson can tamble.and is a good ijanccr. 
These boys work well together. 

Alice Carman, 'a tall attractive yoDng penoa, 
proves her ability of putting over a number and 
gets fine reaulb with all of them. She also docs 
well in the scenes with comedians. Her ward- 
robe is stunning. 

Emma Wilson, the soubrette danced herself 
easily into favor. Miss Wilson is a pleasing 
yonng- brunette who possesses a well formed 
figure. This little Lady has ssreral nnmbos 
during the show and sells - them in a dcTcr 
fashion. H'cr dresses are very becoming to her 
style. 

Arlone Johnson, a well fonned young girl dt»> 
played a pair of shapely limbs in tights on 
ssveral occasions. She too did very well with 
her nufliber on various occasions and was good 
in the scenes. ^ 

Warren Fabian made a neat looking straight, 
while George CoUignfm, Harry Gnth and Jack 
Gutb played small parts very nicely. 

Williams staged a rather different opening 
than is ustiaBy seen in burlesqae shows, opcqing 
on board' on ship, with the lights low, the tiio 
playing string instruments and singing. 

Miss Carman was decided anccessful in her 
specialty. Sbe wore a beautiful gold doth gown, 
with shoes, stockuigs and bat to outeh. Opcniog 
with a song, which she -put over in fine style, 
she finished with a clever eccoitrtc dance. The 
act was appreciated. 

The Hclody Three. Goth, Cbllignon and Gutb, 
offered a musical and sincing specialty in one. 
They played banjo and guitars and played them 
wdl. They finished with a song. The act 
pleased. 

There are Bereral real good novelty numbers m 
the show. The clock number by one of the boys 
and Uias Johnson, assisted by tw el ye of the 
chorus girls, and the Telephone onmber by 
Miss Carman and the chorus is another. 

A high class act was presented by Qeora, a 
classical dancer. Miss Clcora appeared in a 
gorgeous gold cape, which 'waa removed jost 
before going into her act, showing a magnifiocnt 
Egyptian costume. Cleora then danced, her of- 
fering being an artistic Egyptian dance, whidi 
ia a classic The motion of her hands and arms 
and the grace she displayed in all her movemcnta 
was wondcrfaL There is nothing suggestive 
about her act, but instead it is high class art. 

Hiss Carman with two of the hoys went over 
well in a singing and musical act. 

Bobby and Emma Wilson scored with their 
specialty, which opened with a song. They then 
do some dancing. Miss Wilson doing a clever 
hard shoe dance, with Wilson following with a 
sort of a shuffle dance done with big comedy 
shoes. They finished with a song. Its a cork- 
ing good act and they dress it classy. 

The "Radio Girls*' is a bright dever mtutal 
show, with pretty girls! handsome c o stum es and 
a good cast. The only thing that could he sng- 
gcsted would be a little more low eomedy, as 
the comedians got all they could out of the 
bits and scenes they had, hot the time has come 
where btirlesqne audienees like *^okcr and yon 
have to give it to them. However Williami has 
given them a great show and "one that the 
-••HdicBee WiU go- out and talk almt. ' ■- ■ 

SID. 



20 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 11, 1923 



THE 

CUPPER 



wiU be Seventy years old next 
month and is going to celebrate its 
Seyentieth Anniyersary. 



NEW ACTS 



One of the events in connection 
with the celebration will be the 
publishing of an 

Anniversary Number 

filled with interesting facts and 
etoiies of its long career in the 
show business. 



Advertising space in that issue 
will be particularly valuable, but 
the rates will be the same. 

Send in your copy now. 

Everybody in the world of theatri- 
cals will read it. 



HUGH HERBERT AND CO. 

Theatce—Frtrnklin. 
StyJa— Playlet. 
Time — Twenty minutes. 
SettinK— /» three {special). 

*^Iomoa's Children" is the name of 
the new vehicle which Herbert has writ* 
fam for his latest vehicle, succeeding 
'^find Yonr Business," wfaicfa he did for 
several years. "Solomon's Ouldrea" 
shoald last fully as long as the former 
Tcfaide, for it has universal appeal, plen- 
ty of laughs, and a great finisL 

Herbert is supported in this act, by 
Anita Pam, who appeared in his former 
act; Ackland Powell, Henry Gurvey and 
Phyllis Gage. One of the girls is his 
married daughter, and one of the men, 
his married son, in the act. The scene 
is laid at the home of his son-in-law, 
where the children have prepared a sur- 
prise party for Solomon, on his birth- 
day. . He nas been boarding with a Mrs. 
Greenbatim since bis wife's death and 
his children's marriage. 

All four of the children, eitpress great 
affection for their Dad and father-in- 
law, and both couples extend invitations 
to him to come and live with them. In 
this offermg, by the way, Herbert 
appears with a grey beard and wig. 

He doesn't know Just which one's in- 
vitation to accept first and is afraid of 
offending either by accepting the other's. 
He leaves them alone for a few min- 
utes, while they quarrel as to which 
couple he should live with. It then 
appears that both couples are. anxious 
to have him live with them in order to 
have him hdp them in their business, for 
the old man is worth plenty of money. 
While he is out, a_ 'imone call comes 
from his lawyer, telling him that all the 
money he invested with Babmer and 
Company, stock-brokers, has been lost 
with that firm's failure. 

Then the children go into a qnarrel 
over who he should live with again, this 
time each one demanding that he live 
with the other. Solomon retuins and 

notices the change in the atmosphere. 
He accepts each one's invitation, and is 
stalled by excuses, one bong that the 
room for him isn't <iuite ready, it needs 
repapering, the ceiling is falling down, 
and would not be ready for him to move 
into for weeks and weeks. The other 
says the plumbing is bad and that the 
room would be too cold for him He 
is Oua ^ven the 'phone message about 
his money being lost 

He then reaUzes the cause for the 
change in their attitudes, and quotes 
the Talmud, saying "One father can 
support seventeen children, but seven- 
teen children cannot support one fath- 
er." The truth of this got a big hand 
from the audience here. Mrs. Green- 
baum, his landlady 'phones to tell him 
not to worry and that if he needs any- 
thing she will be only too happy to aid 
him, and that his room_ is always open 
for him. He throws this up to his chil- 
dren, and then it develops that he had 
only $700 invested with Rabiner, but is 
still worth over $100,000. The children 
try to make up, but he announces that 
he and Mrs. Greenbaum are to be mar- 
ried. 

The entire playlet is very well written 
and excellently handled by the entire 
cast. Herberts Hebrew _ character, as 
has been stated so many times before, is 
all the more remarlable because of the 
fact that this Scotchman is not a mem- 
ber of the Jewish race. Yet, hb knowl- 
edge of the traditions, the habits, and 
the characteristics of the Children of Is- 
real is nothing short of marveloos. It 
seems like rubbing it in to J. C Rabiner, 
however, by the use of his namf Yet 
again, that might be called timely by 
some people. 

G. J. H. 

Hal Skdly has been engaged as one 
of the comics for Arthur Hammer- 
stein's new musical play, "Lily of the 
Valley." 



DANCE GAMBOL 

Theatre— Proc/or'f 23rd Street. 
Styla— Dance Revue. 
Time — Fifteen minutes. 
Setting-Special. 

Two boys and a girl contribute the 
series of dances which comprise this act 
The boys come on for an introductory 
number, "We Can Dance Our Way Into 
Her Heart" At the dose of the num- 
ber the girl comes on and they go into 
a neat precision dance, incorporating 
some good kicks and acrobatic stuff. 

The girl and one of the boys follow 
with an aeroplane waltz number, im- 
provising it with some dever stuff, after 
whidi the other boy returns for a fast 
solo. 

A mammoth vanity case is lowered and 
the girl hops out in a powder puff cos- 
tume and puts over a neat toe danrr The 
boys return for another number, "Where 
There's A Girl There's A Boy,' and fol- 
low with a competitive contest in which 
the boys attempt to out do each other. 
They showed some stepping that beats 
anytiiing ever seen in a small-time house 
ai^ a lot that has been shown in the 
big-thne theatres. The girl returns and 
the tihree wind up the offering with a 
snappy iiaale. 

"The act is superbly mounted, costumed 
in good taste and is sold with a lightning 
like gusto. It will make a corking 
"doser" for the small time and with a 
little polish could get over in the big- 
time houses. E. J. B. 



MELLETTE SISTERS & CO. 

Theatre— Proc/or'j Fifth Ave. 

Stylo— Dancing. 

Time — Fifteen minutes. 

Setting—Special. 

The Mellette Sisters are statues<^ne 
blondes, who do a dance revue, with 
Lew Pollock, the composer, carrying the 
accompaniments on the piano and doing 
a couple of solos on his own. 

The girls come on, attractively cos- 
tumed, for a tongue twister song, "Le- 
na's Lips Lisped Listlessly," which was 
topped off with a neat double. Pollock , 
followed with a medley of his past and 
present scng successes, with the girls 
returning for a precision dance set to a 
waltz tempo. Pollock filled in again with 
what he said was his latest song, "Vam- 
pin' Sal," with the girls returning in 
Russian costumes for another double 
dance, which closed the act 

The cnrls look wdl, are i»stamed in 
good taste, dance in unison and sdl 
everything with a pleasing punch. The 
offering did well in closing spot, but 
would undoubtedly do better in an ear- 
lier spot of any bill. 

E.J.B. 

NICK AND GLADYS VERGA 

Theatre— Proelor'j 58»A Street. 
Style — "Wop" comedy and singing. 
Time — Fourteen minutes. 
Setting— /» "one." 

A good small time act which will get 
lang^ in the "pop" houses and should 
find plenty of work along that 'type of 
circuit The man does ^op" comedy, 
using mostly released gags for material, 
which can be best illustrated with one 
gag about "my uncle is sick," meaning 
"ankle." 

Both sing, in fairW good voices, the 
man using "Crying For You" as a solo 
with big results. Some of the talk ma- 
terial is a little too old and should be 
dianged for better lines. The idea used 
by so many Hebrew comics, that of 
speaking Yiddish to an audience, is also 
used by Nick Versa, who speaks Italian 
instead, much to the ddight of the two 
or three in the average audioice who may 
be able to tmderstand that language, and 
to the mjrstification of tiiose who cannot 
understand what he is tallchig afbout As 
little of this as possible would improve 
the act G. J. H. 



April 11, 1923 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



21 



TERRIFIC NOVELTY COMEDY HIT 



with the sreateat Comedy Lyric ever written by BILLY JEROME 

AN OVERNIGHT WALLOP I-^CR£AT FOR MALE— FEMALE— DOUBLES— TRIOS OR QUARTETTES. WRITE OR WIRE FOR YOUR COPY TODAY I 



NEW 
ADDRESS 



HARRY VON TILZER MUSIC PUB. CO. 

719 SEVENTH AVE., NEW YORK 



NEW 
ADDRESS 



B. F. KEITH BOOKING EXCHANGE 

Weak oT April 16, 1923 
MZW TOBK OTTT 
PftlmM — Clown Beat — OlMO 8t JohBwn — JnlUn 
BttlDge — Santo* & Hajea— Eddie Lcooanl— Hallen 
& Ruuell— Hugo Belaenfeld it Orcheatn. 

BlTaialda— Oabonie Trl»— B«<t«lll — Hanr Jolion 
— Crafta Haley — Adelmldft & Hoshca— Wood & 
WTde— Mood7 & Dnncan — ComplUneaU or tbe 
8«a*on. 

Coloiilal— Mallnd* Ic Dade — Deagoa & Mack— 
Boooej & Bent & Co. — Darla & FeUe. 

Boyml — Loraer Qlrla — UUa A. Clark — Moore & 
Freed— n. 3. I«Tlatbaii Orcheatra— Bill BobUaoD. 

8Iat BtlMt— De Ljla Alda & Co.— Dorothea 8ad- 
Uer & Co. — Fianley ft Loalae — Bloom ft Stacr — 

Ann amy — Henry ft Adelaide. 

Alhamlira- Morton ft Qlaia — Bob Hall — Ilorcan 
Dancere— Hartley ft Pattenon — Wilbat Ttio. 

Broadway — Panll ft Ooaa — Jnat Out of KnlekeT* 
— Florence Brad; — Tbomton Flynn ft Ca — Hanr 
Bums ft Co. — Holmea ft Lerere. 

Jeffaiaan (Flrat BaU) — Anatrallan Woodcboppei* 
— Holland ft Oden — Flaahea. (BccoDd Halt)— 
Barry Stoddard ft Band. 

Fimnklln (Fliat Halt) — ^Tbe Dlamonda — Heraa ft 
Wllla. (Second Halt)— LeTlno ft Bltn. 

Becent (Plrat Half)— Hymack— Stoddard ft 
Band. (Second Half) — Ferry Corwey — Holland ft 
Oden. 

Cellaenm (Pint Half) — Bonaway Poor — Vincent 
Lopei ft Or. (Second Bait)— Manlllo Broa. — 
Mabel Borke & Co. — Brawn ft Wlilttaker— Hj- 
nack- Byal ft Early — Vincent Lopea ft Or. 

Fordham (Flrat Half) — Man Off tbe Ice Wafon 
—Brown ft Wblttakei^Vadl ft Oygl— LeaTltt ft 
Lockwood. (Second Half)— Mr. & Mis. J. Barry 
— Runaway Four. 

Eamlltnn (Pint Half)— Byal ft Early— Belle 
Baker. (Second Half)— Booth & Nina— The Dia- 
monds. 

BBOOKLTir, V. T, '. 

Orphonm — The Vandertllta — WllUama ft Wolfoa 
—Harry ft Emma Sbarrock— Borne ft Cant. 

Bnahwlck — Rnbe Clifford— Lane ft Freeman — 
Mrae.' Hermann— Seed ft Austin— Enint R. BaU 
—Eight Blue Demons — Browne Slsten — Tim ft 
Kitty O'Meara. 

BlTera. (Flnt Halt)— Mabel Bnrke ft 0>.— Ferry 
Corwey — Murray ft Oakland — Choy Uns Hee 
Troope. (Second Half)- Belle Baker. 

Flatbnsh — Jnllus Tannen. 

Far Bookaway (Second Half) — Cboy Ling Hee 
Troupe — Flashes— Joe Browning — Murray ft Oak- 
land. 

BAtTDfOBE, MD. 
ICarylajid — Rae Samuels — WllUe Bale ft Co. — 
Lewla ft Dody — Wm. C. Dornfleld — ^Thomas E. 
Bbea ft Co. — Paul Specbt's Bond. 

BOSTOir, XAsa. 

Keith's— Ume Trio— Mlllaid ft Merlin— Harriet 
Bempel — Bcaly & Cines^ — Herbert Clifton — Gcetta 
Ardlne — Kay, Hamlin ft Kay. 

BVFTALO, V. T. 
Bhaa's — Burke ft Derkin — Lonesome Manor — 
Veotla Gould- D. D. H.— Lopei Band— Rockwell 
ft Fox. 

cnrcnrNATi, oeio 

Keith's — Six Hassens — George Moore ft Olrts — 
Home ft Donn. 

(^lEVEUlTD, OHIO 
Palaoe — Poor R«adlni;s — Helen Storer — Walter 

C. Kelly— Mabel Fold ft Co. 

lOSth Street — Three Lonlens — Mra. Gene Hngbes 
— Jack Oaterman — Edwsnls ft Bessley — Bmle ft 
Bmlc — Mc(^rthy Sisters. 

CDLinCBUB, OSO 
Keith's- Leddy ft Leddy — Great Jobnson— Van 
Horen— Ellnore ft Wllllsms. 



DARL MacBOYLE 

EXCUmVE MATEMAI. OF EVERY 
DESOUmON 
Far Ra u^ B ls a J Fortran <Mr 
Ue Weat 4Sth Si.. New York 

PtasM BeywBt MM 
-IF IT ISNT RIQHT I ICAU IT ■UOKP' 



VHtDDEWLLE BOJS 

For Next 



DETBOIT, laCH. 
Temple — Bleb Hayes — Miller ft Capman — Frank- 
lin Chariee— Alleeo Stanley— HcLangblln ft Erani 
— Phenom'enal Flayers — Creole Fashion Plate — 
Beran ft Flint- Badee LeveUe ft Co. 

OBASS BAPIDB. MIOH. 
EmpTsss — Vlsser & Q>. — Traps— Tbe Great Imo 
— Stone ft Hayes — Artie Uehllnger ft Co. — Parlor 
Bedroom ft Bath. 

SnOABAFOLU, INS. 
Keith's— UlUan ft Barry Zleglei^Tliank Too, 
Doctor — Princess Badjah — Harriet ft Helen Behol- 
der. 

LOWEIX, MASS. 
Keith's — Janet of Fmnce — Dress Rehearsal — 
Howard ft White— Al Strlkei^Bnle ft O'Brien— 
Ftagbetty ft Stoning. 

XOHTBEAL, OAS, 

Prinoess (April 15) — OUrer ft Olp — Spoor & Par- 
sons — Arcble ft Oertle Fells — Marino ft Martin — 
Pemne ft Ollrer— FoUy ft OS. 

(April 16) — Palerao'a Doga — Harry Uayo — 
Heniy ft Moore — Al. K. Ball ft Co.— Cble Sale — 
Stats of the Futare — YTStte Bugel — El Bey Sla- 
ters. 

PBITASIXPHXA, PA. 

Keith's — Around tbe Comer — Watta ft Hawley 

— Kerr ft Weston — Buth Boye. 

PITTBBirROK. PA. 
SaTia— R. ft W. Roberta— Vincent O'Donnell— 
Al Herman — The Duttons — McKay ft Ardlne. 

POBTI.AIIS, ME. 
Xeith's—Driftwood— Robert Henry Bodge ft Co. 
— lAToyi Models— Fenton ft F1elda---InDe* ft Bynn 
— Norwood ft Hall. 

SOOHEBIEB, K. T. 

Keith's — McRae ft Clegg — Jack Norton ft Co 

Wlllon Sisters- WUUam Halllgan— Senator POrd— 
Bailey ft Cowan— Wayne ft Warrea— Fonr Phll- 
llpa. 

BTBACVBE, V. T. 
Kelth'a — Four Aces — Vsn ft Tyson — Tbe Brlanta 
— Al ft Fannie Stedman — John B. Hymer — Mee- 
ban'a Dogs. 

XOROHTO, OUT. 
Shea's — Osntler ft Pony — Trareta Douglas ft Co. 
— Flo Lewis — Cnlg Ompbell — Juliet — Tom Smith. 

WABHINOTOH, D. O. 
Keith's — Valerie Berger ft Co. — Ona Mnnson ft 
Co.— Pinto ft Boyle — Le Paradla Orchestra— Bron- 
aon ft Edwards. 



ORPHEUM CntCUIT 
Weak of April 15, 1923 
OHIOAOO, ILL. 
Palaoe — MoeconI Family — lebam Joneo— Jolinny 
Bnrke — FHacoc — Lee Kellers. ■ 

Bute lake— Olcolt ft Msiy Ann— Carroll ft 
Donn — Dr. Thompson — E. ft J. Connelly — Bert 
Fitzglbbons — Smith ft Strong. 

SEirVEB, COLO. 
Orpheom — Jessie Dualey — Donga! ft Leery — 
Budcll ft Dunlgan — Fortf Dancera — Charlie Wilson 
— Bricklayers — Lncas ft Ines — Iiene Franklin. 

SES IfOIlIES, IOWA 
Orpheom- Aerial Valentines— Frels ft Wilson— 
Darls & Darnell — C^rl Francio ft Claire — Patay 
Shelly ft Band. 

SAXBAB OTTT, MO. 
Mala St. — Detson — Owen McGWeoey — Stan of 
Testeiday- B. ft B. Wheeler— Wm. ft Joe Uandel 
— Frances WUllaas ft Vaoeiiel — Mra. Bodolpb 
Valentino. 

STANLEY AGENCY 

SPEOAUZOfa SUBURBAN 
DOURANCK OP AU 

, I». Y. TA 



L08 ASOEUB, OAIm 
Orpheom- XJttle Cottage — Bath Bros. — Fred 
Bogtae*- •Hamid, Wynficd ft Bmcc — Wylle ft 
Hortmaxi — Duncan Slsten — Vera Oocdon — La Mont 
Trio. 

Bill St.— Steppe ft O'NeU— Tear of Ua— Coogah 
ft C*tT — Lola ft BenU— Itie Canslso*— Coitei 
Slsten. 

mLWAusn, wn. 

Palaoe— Loo Tellegen— Gna Fowler— FstllcoU— 
M. ft P. Mlllep— Hunt ft Vogt— Billy DalB ft Co. 
— Doree Operalogne. 



^tUBEAPOUB* 
. Bennepla — Peres ft Maigneritc — Jack liSVler — 
Blossom Seeley — CUyton ft Edwards — Seattle Bar- 
mony Kings — Famell / ft Flocenre Jnlinson ft 

Baker. 

HEW OBLEAHB. XJL. 
Orphaam — Leo Carrlllo— Harrr Wataea — Pewen 
ft Wallace— The Betberti. 

OAXUBD, OAIk 
Oiphsom — FOmll Aylor Co. — Four Camenms 
Gene aieeoe — Saisent ft Uarrln — GattlBoii, Jones 
ift Band — Emmy's Pets. 



Ofphenm — Berg ft BngUab — Carlisle ft Lamal — 
Barry Holmon— Val and Gamble — Stan of Tes- 
tcrday — Joe Cook— Creav ft Dayne — ^Alex. Bras, ft 
J. Smith. 

FOBTLAXD, ME. 

Otpbenm— Benry B. Walthall— Flanlgnn ft Uor- 
rison — De Marcoa ft Sheik Band — GtanTllle ft Ban- 
den — Bimion ft Baldwin — Uirlno ft Ilartla— Al- 
thca Locaa — Clara Howard. 

BA^BAJCESTO aw Ti ^be&VO 
Orphenin — Land of Fantasy — Smith ft Barker — 
Mfore ft Kendell — Joeepblne Amone — Joe BoUey 
ft Co.- Braro, MlcheUno ft TmllUo. 

ST. LOUn, HO. 
Orphonm- Fanny Brice— Clivnm. ETldence— Ttie 
Kellora — Chief CanpoUcan — Stan Stanley — Snow. 
(Tolumbns ft Boctor. 

BAB FBAH(3BC0, "^st. 
Orpheom — Dsnce Creations — Msx Fisher Band — 
Bam Onnkl— Bal Skelly— The Sheik— Don Valerio 
Trio— Adler ft Boss — Wblllng ft Burt. 

Ooldsn Gate— Hoodlnl — Jean Adair— Wright ft 
Dietrich — Boyal Sidneys — Balnbow's End — Edwin 

George. 

SEAnXE^ WAfiH. 

Orphenm — Amit Jemima — Walton ft Brant — 
Dance Fantasy — Ernest Blatt — Snell ft Vernon — 
Leon Vavan — Wellington Cross — Ames ft Wln- 
throp. 

BIOUX OITT, IOWA 
. Oiphennt— Pierce ft Byan— Lore Sisters — "Many 
Me" — Milt CoUlne — Frank Whitman — Frances 
Kennedy — Benee, Boberts ft Orebcstra — Big Jim. 

yAKCouvza, b. o. 

Orphanm— MItty ft Tllllo— ChsrUe Irwin— Ja Da 
Three — Toto — Morris ft Campbell — McDonald 
Three — Sylvester Fsmlly — Fire Lelands. 



wnnnsEo. xab. 

Oiphanm — Frank Uclntyre — Roye ft Maye — Tony 
ft Norman — Sylvia Clark — lliree White Enhns — 
Gordon ft Rica — Bobby McLean ft Co. 



PANTAGES CIRCUIT 
Weok of April 16, 1923 
ST. PAUL, Mm. 
Leon ft Mlul— Tbree Falcone — Callahan ft BUsa 
— Purcella ft Bamssy — Juliet Dike — Clay Crooch 
ft Co. 



Laura DaVlna— Early ft Lalgbt— Banr Baiaiuui 
— Ktini ft White— Fnnkia ft Jolmal*— Outtd'A 
Toy Shop. 

HBIIBA AXD ■AaXASeOR 

Martlaem— Cobb ft Albert— Klaas ft BiOUaat— 
Dance Brolntloas — Fraada Beoantt — O eoi Mayfc 



Detnlt TMo— Bpeedeie— Nan ■ Hilp*il»— Cbock 
Haas— Crania ft Hart — Boao Blatara ft ABob. 



"Wblri ot the World.' 



TIL. IM ■BTAlfT 

E. HEHB^piNCEB. INC 
JEWELERS 



wsiaTit.w WAaS. 
PhlL La TDska— Mack ft CastletoB— OI«a Mlobka 
Ok. — Charbot Itartool Coi — Walter Wesms lllr 
Sheika of Anhy. 

VABCOUVZB, B. a 
Paaqnall Broa. — Dnmmlea— Prlnctoa ft Veraoo — 
Alpine nree— Bd AOes ft Tsxl— Bnrfea ft Betty. 



De Lyons Dno-^lm ft Jack— La Fine ft : 
— Marriage renna DITorce — Begal ft Moon Co. — 
Borl Trio. 

Tansssa WASH. 

Togo— Darla ft McCoy — ^Twenty Mlnotea la 
Chlnat^n — Flnley ft HIB — Wmie Broa. — rbaptna 

P0BTLAB9, OBK 
Bob La Salle Co. — Joe Jackson' Fqnills Brae. — 
Lewis ft Norton— Chick Sopreme— Boss ft Boffli. 

TRAVEL 

Schepp'a Circus — CsTeman Lere — Harranl. Bolt 
& K. — Hope Veinoo — Devey ft Bogeia— Jack 

Doran. 

BA3I PBABCIBCO, 
Foxworth ft rrands — Fire Jsnaeya — Morln 81». 
ten— Chas. Howard ft Co. — Tony ft George — Ad> 
Eaile ft Lewla. 

OAZLAiro, OAL 
Sbelk'e Farorite — Zlntoor Braa.— Harry Blooa^— 
Man Hunt. 

LOB ABGEUS. CAL. 
Bra La Bne — Blal ft Uadatmm — Bogen, Boy 
ft Bog tra Virginia Belles — Morrlssey ft Toong. 

BAV DIEGO, OAL. 
Era Tanguay — La Dora ft Beckmen — Once ft 
Eddie Parka— Oklahoma Four— Bert Walton. 

LOHO BEAOH, CAL. 
Tlie LaTonas — Tbree Is a Crowd — Ford ft Traly 
— Stephen ft Holllater — Vaidon ft Peny — Belle- 
Claire Bioa. 

BALX LAKE lUTX, UZAS 
Bantlago Trio — White ft Barry — Harry Hlaes — 
Hannefotds — Maude Leooa. 

OODOr, UTAH 
The Lnman — Valledta Leoparda — Sheman. Van 
ft Byman— Buth Budd— Pbllbrlck ft De Voe — 
Untah Uasterman. 

SEBVEB, COLO. 
Kate ft WUey— Storey ft Clark— Noodles Fagaa 
— Joale Heather ft Co.— Palo ft Pelet— Blchaid- 
soo Twins. 

COLOBASO 8PBIHGB AHS FVmA 
L. Bnrkhart Q>. — Pierce ft Goff— Ketner ft 
Beaney — Thalera — Betty ft Lov Bart — Mater 
Bhodeo. 

OXAHA, BEB. 

Bobby Lebman— Ward ft Dooley— Nortno ft Mel- 
notte — Jack Qoldle — Seven Algerians — Bamea ft 
Hamilton. 

CCoMiiumtd en pat9 26) 



BOnCDB-^CIB ABB KUBIOAL TiBB BOTTCB OOfBO EAST ABS WER 
yjly^ L^^^I^J^jr '^'""^ * BooUss Oflaa la CUoass. 

TBI-STATE THEATBICAL EXCHAN6E ' 




22 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 11, 1923 



CIRCUS 



WUrm-BLUMENFELD CO. CHANGES 

As an aftermath of the difficulties that 
Wirth and Blumenfeld encountered during 
the Marine Circus at the lOStb Field Ar- 
tiUei7 .Armory recently, Frank Wirth and 
George Uamid took over the stock and 
interests that Herman Blumenfeld and 
Max Lowtnstein held in the firm. The 
amount paid Blumenfeld and Lowenstein 
together is said to be in the neighborhood 
of $50,000. 

Wirth and Blumenfeld, who were com- 
ing to the front as representatives of cir- 
cus, park and carnival acts, and who had 
booked engagements for acts which will 
bring them more than $200^000 this season 
through Mr. Blumenfeld, made arrange- 
moits for the providing of talent for the 
Marine Circus. When the firm encoun- 
tered di£5culty in obtaining money toward 
the end of the circus, an attorney was 
called in by the concern to see if some 
adjustment could be made so -that Wirth 
and Blumenfeld could get mxmey to pay 
off the acts they had engaged. The at- 
torney was shown the contract by Harold 
Cxattent,'' attorney for Romaine Benjamin, 
and the drcns offidab. The first para- 

f'apfa of the contract read that Wirth and 
lumenfeld wiiived all liability as far as 
otiiers were concerned in the project and 
assumed responsibility for any liabilities 
that might accrue throagfa their action. 
As a result, when people made claims 
against the circus officials, they were re- 
ferred to Wirth and Blumenfeld, with the 
result that several suits were filed against 
the firm. ' 

Frank Wirth and Hamid, who left the 
details of the project and the handling of 
the contract and business of the circus to 
Blumenfeld, when they fotmd out the status 
of the firm in the matter and that obliga- 
tions vrould be thrown upon their shoulders, 
immediately started negotiations for the 
taking over of Blumenfeld and Lowenthal's 
interest in the business. This was accom- 
plished after several days of conference 
between the parties and Blumenfeld and 
Lowenthal withdraw from the firm last 
Thursday. 

On the last night of the drcus, through 
Wirth and Blumenfeld threatening not to 
allow the show to proceed that eve- 
ning unless they obtained some money on 
account, they were given $2,600 at the 
direction of Attorney Content. 

The show was a good one and all that 
attended seemed to like it. 



WALTER L. MAIN CIRCUS OPENS 

The Walter L. Main Circus opened the 
1923 season at C3urlottesville, Va.. Satnr- 
tby, April 7. The drcns has one of the 
best programs that they have ever pre- 
sented and May Wirth with Phil and the 
Wirth Family are the feature, along with 
Andmr Downie's Double Herd of Per- 
forming Elephants. J. H. (Doc) Oyler is 
in chaise of the Side Show and has a 
wonderful line up of attractions, featur- 
ing Little Freddie, the Armless Wonder. 
Jimmie Heron has the Annex Show. Both 
shows have a brand new line up of ban- 
ners. The street parade has sevetal new 
features and is very well dressed. Busi- 
ness was capacity at both performances. 
The circus goes to Staunton, Va., from 
here and then through West Virginia and 
Ohio. 



HARVEY WITH SELLS-FLOTO 

It. M. Harvey, who has been Office 
Manager and in charge of the advance of 
the wmter Indoor Grcas for the Muggi- 
van-Ballard-Bowers Interest will succeed 
Ed. C Warner as General Agent and 
Traffic I^nager of the Sells-FIoto Grcus. 
The Sells-Floto Circus ' oiwned the 1923 
season at the Coliseum, Chicago Apr. 7th. 
and will close the ChicagD engagement 
April 21st and will jump to Peru. Jnd^ to 
open under canvas Monday, April 23rd. 
Indianapolis. Ind, 24th. Richmond, Ind.. 
25th, SpriDgfield, O.. 26th. Columbus, C 
27th. Newark. 0_ 28th. Pituburgh. Pa., 
April 30th and May 1st - 



SPARKS CIRCUS OPENS 

Macon. Ga.. April 9.— The Sparks Cir- 
cus opened its season here last Thursday 
afternoon, both the matinee and evening 
shows being given for the benefit of local 
institutions. An unusually large attendance 
'Patronized the show, with every indication 
that good business will continue at subse- 
quent performances. 

The Rotation Horses, tmder the direc- 
tion 'of Ernest Kloske, was one of the 
favorite acts, and are new additions to the 
Sparks Show, having been recently im- 
ported from Germany. Miss Naida Miller, 
tight slack artist, doing a variety of dances, 
etc, was another novelty, and the Japanese 
act done by Prince Jary Sakato, that of 
sliding down the rope on his feet, was 
also highly applauded. Other acts were 
seen to good advantage. 

The ammal part of the show this year 
is one of the best in its history and in- 
cludes several fast wild animal acts. Sheve 
Batty, recently recovered from a bout with 
an animal, excels this year in an act that 
is better than anything heh,'>^j^one in the 
past ' ^1^. 

After leaving here "Uie rirwK b booked 
for' Columbus, and then to Griffin, before 
heading north. 



RINGLING LEFT A MILUON 

MoBBisTowN. N. J., April 9.— T. Ring- 
ling, of Ringling brothers, left an estate 
of close to a million dollars, according to 
the inventory filed here last week in the 
Surrogate's office by the administrators of 
the estate of the dead circus man. Ring- 
ling's late home, known as Ringling Park, 
is in Jefferson Township, Morris County. 

A value of $970,424.91 is put upon the 
personal estate, according to the inven- 
tory, the value of the real estate not being 
given. The one-third interest in the Ring- 
ling Brothers, Bamum & Bailey Circus, 
which was owned by the late T. Ringling, 
is valued at $83,943. 

In the inventory is included a detailed 
valuation of animals in the circus owned 
in part by the Alfred Ringling Estate, 
The most expensive animals are the 
giraffes, valued at $3XiOO each. A rhinocer- 
ous is valued at $2,000 and a hippopotamus 
receives a like appraisal $1,700 apiece is 
the price put on the elephants. 



GRONHAW WITH SELLS-FLOTO 

L. B. Greenhaw, who started this sea- 
son as general agent of Golden Bros.' 
Trained Wild Animal Circus, is now con- 
nected with the Sells-Floto Circus as con- 
tracting agent Mr. Greenhaw was in 
New York last week with C. W. Finney, 
the general contracting, agent of the show. 



POWERS ELEPHANTS FOR VAUDE. 

The Powers Elephants, now playing 
with the Hippodronie show, are booked to 
play the Palace Theatre, New York, right 
after the closing of the Big House. "The 
elephants will be featured at one or more 
amusement parks this Summer. 



THE ARLINGTONS RECOVER 

Mr. and Mrs. George Arlington, of New' 
York, are again able to be out after being 
confined to their hotel on account of ill- 
ness. Their son, Edward Arlington, is 
kept very busy with his string of hotels 
in New York City. 



THREE CIRCUSES FOR HUNTINGTON 

There are three Grcuses contracted to 
play Huntington,. W. Va. Walter L 
Main Circus, Spark's World Famous Gr< 
cus, and Patterson Trained Wild Animal 
and Gentry Bros. Shows Combined. 



LEOPARDS ON PAN. TIME 

Arthur Hill, manager of Valiceda's 
Leopards, now playing Pantages time, re- 
ports that they have just extended the 
contract and that the act will play most 
.of the Summer in their different houses. 



OUTDOOR EXPOSITIONS 



BISTANY BACK FROM PANAMA 

L.eo Bistany accompanied by Hamid Ben 
and the rest of his company arrived in 
New York last Friday from Panama, 
'where the Bistany Shows were engaged 
for the Panama Exposition this past 
winter. The Leo Bistany Shows will open 
the season at Buffalo, N. Y. Mr. Bistany 
has leased the Rides and Shows of A. 
Pohill of Beacon, N. Y. 



"ir' IS BIG NOVELTY 

"IT" Exhibition Co. of New York are 
offering one of the greatest novelties ever 
invented for a pit show. "IT" is a paper 
Mache figure of King Tut IT tallcs to 
you and answers any question you care to 
ask it It is strictly a mechanical device 
and is not operated with a person con- 
cealed inside. The figure is easily opened 
to show that it is empty. 



DERBY GAMES IN PARKS 

The Kentucky Derby Co. of New York 
will , have as usual several of their games 
of Skill including the new game Puzzle 
in several Parks -in and around New York. 
The Kentucky Derby is now operated in 
practically every Amusement Park in the 
United States and Canada, besides those 
in Foreign countries. 

TEN SHOWS OPEN IN N. Y. 

There are no less than ten exposition 
shows opening up in and around New York 
that are only carrying rides and conces- 
sions. No show mil be carried and sev- 
eral similar ones are playing in and around 
Boston, Philadelphia and Baltimore. 



WESTCHESTER SHOW AT YONKERS 

The Westchester Amusement Co. 
opened their season at Yonkers, N. Y., 
Apr. 6th, and will play at Yonkers most 
of the Summer, as they have contracted 
to play under several different auspices 
in different parts of the dty. 



MORRIS UNGER IN N. Y. 

Morris Unger, of the Unger Construc- 
tion Col, of Pittsburgh, Pa., builders of 
rides and shows for parks and expositions, 
is in New York on business for hb com- 
pany. Mr. Unger reports that their fac- 
tory is very busy turning out their Spring 
orders. 



BERNARDI SHOWS OPENING 

Jack Carr, general agent of the Bemardi 
Greater Shows, is now in New York. The 
show opens Petersburg, Va., April 14, 
and is contracted to play Norfolk, Va., 
Salisbury, Md., and Dover, Del., on its 
way north. 

FASHION SHOW FOR NEWARK 

John F. Holloran & Co. of New York 
are putting on a Fashion Show and Bazaar 
for the Salaam Temple, Newark, N. J. 
May 19th to 26th at the Newark Armory. 

BERNARDI IN NEW YORK 

Fleece Bemardi, manager of the Do- 
minion Exposition Shows was in New 
'York last week. He is making his head- 
quarters at Chicago. 



ACME SHOWS OPEN 

Heller's Acme Shows opened the season 
at West New York, N. J., Saturday, April 
7, and will play that location until April 21. 



BECK BACK FROM CUBA 

Louie Beck, one time press agent of the 
Frank 'C. Bostock Show, has been in Cuba 
this' past Winter with his large collection 
■'of snakes. Mr. Beck returned to New 
'V'ork last week and is not as yet ready 
to announce his plans for thb season. 

LEROY BACK FROM MEXICO 

Charles Lcroy of Brooklyn has just re- 
turned from Mexico where he has been' 
spending the winter. Mr. Leroy will 
shortly decide whether he will have his 
Rit shows with an Exposition or a Circus. 

GERARD SHOW OPENS 

Gerard's Greater Shows opened the sea- 
son in New York City Saturday, April 7, 
for three weeks and will then start their 
tour through New England. This is a 
firteen-car show. 



WEST SHOWS OPEN 

The West Shows opened the 1923 sea- 
son at Tarboro, N. C., April 7, and are- 
contracted to play the following towns: 
.•\pril 18, Wibon, N. C; Washington, 
D. C, April 30. 



PERCIVAL BROS. SHOW OPENS 

Percival Bros. Circabar, a new exposi- 
tion show, with six rides and a free act,- 
and a good line-up of concessions, opened 
on the lot in Brooklyn, N. Y., last Satur-' 
day, .\pril 7. 

ENTERPRISES: SHOW OPENING 

Edson and Ziegler, Managers of The 
Theatrical Enterprbe Inc., will open at 
Wallington, N. J., Apr. 21st, with their 
rides and Concessions. 



HNK IN NEW OFFICE 

IxHUS Fink, manager of the Fink Ex^to-' 
sition .Shows, has moved his office from' 
New York 4o Plainfield, N. J., the winter, 
quarters of the Show. 



GRUBERG BACK WITH SHOW 

Wilbur S. Cherry, after an ahsence of 
nearly two years, is back with Rubin 
Gruberg, as General Agent of the Rubin 
and Cherry Shows. 



CAL. SHOWS OPEN APRIL 23 

The California Shows, Anderson and 
Hall, managers, will open the season at 
Waltham, Mass., April 23. 



CENTURY SHOWS OPENING . 

The Twentieth Century Shows, H. F. 
Ketchum, manager, will open the season of 
1923 at Gloversville, N. Y., Saturday, April 
14. 



EXPOSITIONS 

.Acme Shows, West New 'V'ork, N. J., Apr. 
7th to 21st. 

Gnard Exposition Shows, New York City, 
Apr. 7th to 28tb. 

Finney Ralph Shows, Brooklyn, N. Y., Apr. 
9tfa to Nth. 

Johnny J. Jones Exposition Shows, 'Wmsbing- 
toD, D. C, Apr. 9th to 21st. 

Percival Bros. Shows, Brooxtyn, N. Y., Apr. 
7th to Nth. 

Tajder Bros. Shows, Brooklyn, N. Y., Apr. 
9th to 14tb. 

Westchester Amusement Co., Yonken, N. Y., 
Apr. 7th to 14lh. 

WiUiams Bros.. No. 1 Shows, Brooklyn, N. Y.. 
Apr. 9th to 14th. 

WiUiams Bros. No. 2 Shows, Brooklyn, N. Y., 
Apr. 9th. to 14. 



The Kentucky Derby 

HAS "MADE" O'VER ISO CONCESSIONAIRES. WHY NOT YOU? 

THE PUZZLE V 

(PATENT PENDING) WILL SURPRISE YOU ❖ 
^ THE KENTUCKY DERBY CO., INC. 1416 Broadway, N. Y. 'jf 

Phone Penn. 0595 ^ 



April 11, 1923 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



23 



CUCUS IS HAZARDOUS GAME 

The circus is a hazardous and uncertain 
business, according to John M. Kelley, 
counsel for the estates of the late Henry 
and Alfred T. Ringling, and fortunes have 
been lost in the attempt to keep the big 
outdoor amusement enterprises going. 
Names, good-will, reputation, have counted 
for little in the transfer of drcases, he 
continued. 

The trials of the circus were related by- 
Mr. Kellcy in the' case of the government 
assessment of inheritance taxes upon the 
estates of the Ringlings. Alfred Rmgling 
owned a third interest in the Kingling 
Brothers & Bamum & Bailey Crcus and 
Henry owned a quarter. Upon -3ch estate 
the government laid a total tax of $100,000 
to $150,000 and the question before the 
Board of Appeals and Review of the. In- 
heritance Division of the' Treasury Depart- 
ment was the value of the "good-will" 
passed along to the Ringling Brothers and 
Bamum & Bailey shows. 

Mr. ' Kelley argued that the good-will 
amounted to little or nothing, because the 
fortunes of the circus depended upon the 
genius and foresight of the men who man- 
aged it He called the circus a hazardous 
business. 

"Theatres, baseball and other lines of 
business with fixed locations are able to go 
on regularly," Mr. Kelley said. "But the 
circus can issue no rain check nor hold ad- 
vance sales^ li the day is lost, all is lost 
that pertains to a.giyefi jitandr 

"The good-wiU of a baiilc or. a depart- 
ment store is based oh long- dealing in one 
community, but every drcus that goes out 
makes its appeal for patronage on the 
claim of having something new. At best 
it is an experiment 

"What is commonly accepted as good- 
will in the circus name of the Ringlings 
is more correctly interpreted as confidence 
of the public in their professional ability 
and skill to present exceptional, clean and 
dependable entertainment. 

"The grinding process of carrying a dr- 
cus about the country, of building a tented 
dty every day, of tearing it down and 
transporting it at night, of being prepared 
to handle vast crowdb in unfamiliar places 
'twice daily, rain or shine,' derisively^ and 
unmistakably determine for every^ circus 
owner just how big he can build his show 
and operate it" 

Telling of the growth of the Ringling 
circus from a small menagerie, Mr. Kelley 
said that for twenty-five years the brothers 
baxety deared expenses, but they kept on.. 
Seekmg to show the quality of personal 
genius that makes a drcus a success, Mr. 
Kelley reviewed tlie history of scores of 
other arouses. The Gollmar Brothers, 
cousins of the Ringlings, started a show in 
1891, he said, but were never able to build 
or operate more than a one-train drcus. 
Th^ avoided a failure by retiring after 
twenty-six years of hard work, he asserted. 

The Adam Forepaugh show was never 
a profitable investment from the time its 
founder died in 1890 until the Ringlings 
took it over in 1905, he said. The drcus 
started by Willie Sells in 1900 and operated 
later under various names was an example, 
that good-will cannot be passed along as a 
great asset, said Mr. Kelley. 

"Fortunes have been lost in building cir- 
cuses," he conduded. "Fortunes have been 
lost in fruitless attempts to keep them go- 
ing. Name, good-will; reputation, have 
counted for little in the transfer of dr- 
cuses. In 100 years it has never figured 
as an item of any consequence. In a los- 
ing game the circus has struggled hard for 
self-preservation. Name and good-will 
have been mere incidents." 



OAYUGHT SAVING STARTS APRIL 29 

Daylight saving this year begins at 2 
A. M. Sunday, April 29. 

The iptroduction of the daylight saving 
several years ago brought a yelp from 
motion picture circles, especially those who 
run open air shows during the Summer 
months. The picture men based their 
grievance upon the claim that the daylight 
saving program euchred them out of an 
extra performance, inasmuch as under the 
time saving program nightfall is delayed 
until 9 o'clock in the Summer evenings. 

The latter have now become accustomed 
to it and have accepted it. However, in 
a number of states legislatures have pro- 
hibited the daylight saving program by 
legislation. 

The now program, however, will neces- 
sitate the readjustment of train time for 
touring companies and will keep the ad- 
vance men on the qui vive making the 
necessary changes in transportation sched- 
ules in the various cities that will use the 
new time system. 



MAYNES IN WASHINGTON 

H. F. Maynes, inventor of the Caterpillar 
Ride and Bert Earl Ride, operator and 
concessionaire, were in New York last week 
for a few days and left for the Johnny J. 
Tones Exposition Shows, now playing 
Washington, D. C. 



GUCK IN PETERSBURG 

William Click has left New York for 
Petersburgh, Va., the Winter Quarters of 
the Greater Bernard! Shows, which open in 
that town April 17. . . . .. 



SOLLY SHAW WITH BRODY 

Solly Shaw, formerly of the vaudeville 
team of Shaw & Kay, has joined Nat 
Brody, well known agent with offices at 
245 West 47th street They are booking 
fifteen vaudeville houses in and around 
New York. Joe Waldron's "Speedway. 
Girls" have been booked for an indefinite 
run by the firm at the Rialto Theatre, 
Lakewood, N. J. 



SELLS-FLOTO OPENS BIG 

In a wire from Chicago, Saturday, April 
7, it stated that the Sells-Floto Circus 
opened to very good business and that the 
performance is the finest they have ever 
presented. The DeRillo Riding Act with 
seven people and the big Twenty-four 
White Horse Act were the features. 



STANDARD DOING WELL 

The World Standard Shows will finish 
their three weeks engagement at Chidayo, 
Peru, and reports from the show to Frank 
Hughes say, that they are now doing a 
very nice business. 



HANSHER SHOW OPENS APRIL 28 

Hansher Bros.' Attracti(»is will open the 
1923 season at Milwaukee, Wis., April 28, 
and play some very good territory through 
the Middle West 



MURPHY CO. OPENS 

J. F. Murphy Produdng Company, with 
a new idea of outdoor expositions, will 
start the season of 1923 at Portsmouth, 
Va, Thursday, April IZ 



JOHNSON AND COSTELLO OPENING 

R. M. Johnson and M. J. Costello will 
open this season with their "Three Rides 
and about IS concessions at Tarrytown, 
N. Y., about Apr. 28. 

RILEY SHOW OPENS APRIL 17 

■ Matthew J. Riley is now at winter quar- 
ters of the Matthew J. Riley Shows, getting 
the Show ready to open April 17, in 
Trenton, N. J. 

KRAUSE IN HOSPITAL 

Bennie Krause, -who just returned last 
week from Porto Rico, where his show 
played this past Winter, underwent a minor 
operation in a local hospital last week. 

B4RS. GLICK VISITS HOME 

Mrs. William Glide is in Dubois, Pa, 
with her people, for a short visit before the 
opoiing of the Greater Bemardi Shows, of 
vi^ch her husband is one of the owners. 



ENDY IN POTTSTOWN 

Harry N. Endy^ Manager of the Endy 
Shows, who was m New York last week 
on business, has returned to winter 
quarters at Pottstown, Pa. 



Alice Fisher and John Cumberland 
will be featured in the cast of "My Aunt 
... From Ypsilanti." 



Mr. Musician 

You Make Song Hits 



So do you, Mr. Actor. What do either one of you'get out of it? 
A pat on the back — ^You're a jolly good fellow. You're anotfaer 
Jolson. You've got Lopez or Whiteman licked. 

Mr. Congenial Prbfessi<»al— Band & Orchestra Mgr. said so and 
tiie dance goes on. So does the plug go on. So docs the pubtie go^on 
buying sheet music, reconls and rolls of the songs that you make po^Mt- 
lar. No reflection on Mr. Publisher. He's in the business of puMWhing 
songs. Somebody has to make diem popular. 



Gilbert Conceives Co-operative Plan 



.\ ^ort time ago Wolfe Gilbert, the well known muac publisher, 
whose three outstanding hits are "The Natchez," "Robert E. Ixe" 
and "On a Moonlight Night," figured it out this way. As long as 
you do make songs, why not give yoti the opportunity to share in the 
profits? 

So he re-organized and formed a greater ooiporation associating with 
himself Mr. Thos. J. Geiaghty (Supervising Director of The Famous 
Flayers-'Lasky Coip.) as Vice-Pres., Mr. J. Diamond (Pres. Yale Taxi 
Corp. ) as Chairman Board of Directors, and an efficient sftaff of busi- 
ness executives. 

Now eveiy musician and performer has the opportimity of beoomiog 
a partner in his mvn company, of taking an active interest in hit own 
catalog of songs, of boosting and plugging his own tunes, of beii^ in 
business for himself. 

Subscription is open at $5.00 per unit, consisting of one ^lare of 8% 
ciunulative preferred stock and one share of common stodc in tiie com- 
pany. You may subscribe to as little as you wish. Hie more shares 
you hold, the better for you. You are limited, however, to not more 
than twenty units. Better fill out the attached coupon at once. It is 
already an assured success. .Hundreds upon hundreds are already 
subscribers. 



Dept C. Date 

L. WOLFE GILBERT MUSIC CORPORATION 

1658 Broadway, New York Citj 

I hereby subscribe to units in 

The L. WoUe Gilbert Motic Coipontion 
Each unit consists of one share of 8% Cumulative Preferred stock ($5.00 
par value) and one share of Common Stock ($5.00 par value). 

Price 15.00 per aniL 



Enclosed find 
Accepted 



M.0.1 
Check \ 
Dnft J 



L. Wolfe Cilben Music Coip. 

By 

Partial pajrment plan. 

S unit* $2.00 weeklj. □ 

lOtioita S.OO weeklj. □ 

20 units 10.00 wetUj. □ 

Mark X in block. 



Namt 

Addrass . . . 

City 

Bunnnt ... 
Phont No. 



Make all dbecfca payable to L. Wolfe Gflbert Motic Corponlioa 



24 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 11, 1923 



iraEBSIfiBEZfill 

OFFERS ENTERTAINED FOR NEXT SEASON 





Featured on Columbia Circuit i this season,rwith tlie Greenwich Vlllafe Revue 



This Week, Miner's Empire, Newark. 
Next Week, Orpheum, Pat^rson. 



CUPPER— MARCH 28. 1923 

R^T Read to our war of thinking is one of the fiunlest littis Uds in bnriesque. 
He 13 a natural wit and a real funster. His mannerisms and style of delivering 
nis wares is dififerent from others. Read is a fine comedian and all be does is done well. 
Senna is doinir his "bum" comedT role werldnir along the lines be has been doiOB 
nght alonic. He and Read work well together. 



!»'. . h\Urii\'-ii>"i'4Wiy-iiYnYim iYi kYii\ :\W/\\ ?i'\'i^^^^^ 



BURLESQUE ROUTES 



coLUUBiA cntcurr 

American Girls — Gayct7, Pittsburgh, 9-14; Cclo- 

nial. Qereland. 16-21. 
Biff Jamhnrce — Open 9>14; Empire, Brocklyn, 

16-21. 

BUr Watson B«e{ Trust — CUyrty. Rocboler. 

9-14; LTtenm. Ithara. 16; Aaboni, 17; Bing. 

hamtcQ, 18: Utica. 19-31. 
Boa Tom — Ctyety, Buffalo, 9-14; Gayety, 

Rochetter, I4-2I 
Proadway Breritjcs — Palace, Baltimore, 9-14; 

Gayety, Wssbingtoii. 16-21. 
Biodway Fbppera — Colonial, Cleveland, 9-14; 

Empire, Tdcdo, 16-21. 

Bowery Bnrlesqnos — Gayety, Milwaukee, 9-14; 

Cclnmbia, Chicago, 16-21. 
BnbUe Bubble — Gayety, Boston. 9-14; Columbia; 

New Yetk. 16-21 
iCbneMes of 1923 — Cdumbia, Chicago, 9-14; Sur 

and Garter, Oiicago, 16-21. 
Dn-e Majv.n'c Own Show — Gayety, Wasfaingtcn. 

9-14; Gayety, Pittsburgh, 16-21. 
Flashiigfats of 1923 — Mrner's Bronx, New York, 
■ 9-14; Empire. Proyidcxice. 16-21. 
Follies of the Day — Cuino, Philadelphia, 9-14: 

Falac^ Baltimon, 16-21. 
EVaaJc Finney Rene — Casino, Boston, 9-14 

(close). 

Folly Town — Gayety. Kansas City, 9-14 fdooe). 
Glgsles — Stone, Binghamtm. 1 1 ; Colonial, Utica, 
12-14: Gayety. Montreal, Can., 16-21. 

Granwich Village Review — Empire, Newark . 9- 
14; Orpheum, Pateracn, 16-21. 

Hello Good Times — Gayety. St. Louis, 9-14: Gay- 
ety, Kansas City, 16-31. 

Hippity Hop — Open 9-14; Hurtig & Scamon's, 
New York, 16-21. 

Jimmy Cooper's Besnty Review — Hurtig & Sca- 
mon's. New York. 9-14; open 16-21; Brwiklyn. 
23-28. 



Knick Knacks— Lyric Dayton. O., 9-14; Olym- 

r-ic, Ctnoonati, 16-21. 
I-ct*s Co — Empire. Brooklyn. 9-14; Vorkville. 

New York, 16-21. 
Maids of Airerica — Open 9-14; Gayety, St. 

Louis, 16-21. 

Mimic World— Yorkvine, New York, 9-14; Ca- 
sino, Pbiladdph'S, 16-21. 

Mollie Williams* Show- — Olrmpie, Cincinnati, 9- 
14; open 16-21; Gaycly, St. Lonis, 33-28. 

Radio Girls — Columbia, New Yoik, 9-14; Casino. 
Brr^/Klyn. 16-21. 

Reeve's Show — Gayety, Montreal, Can., 9-14; Ca- 
sino, Boston, 16-21. 

Roekelk— Empire, Toledo, O., 9-14; Lyric. Day- 
tnn, 16-21. 

Step On It — Empire, Providence. 9-14: Gayety. 

BcFton, 16-31. 
"Sliding" Baiy Watscn, Fun Show — Gayety, De- 

trcit. 9-14; Empire. Toronto, 16-21. 
Social Maids — Star and Garter, Chicago, 9-14; 

Empress, Chicago, 16-21. 
Talk of the Town — Gayety, Minneapolis, 9-14; 

Gayety, .MUwarkee, 16-31. 
Wine. Wrmen and Song — Casino, Brooklyn, 9- 

14; Empire, Newark. 16-21. 
Yoiitbful Follin — Orpheum, Fatenon, 9-14; open 

16-21; Hurtig & Seamon's, New •York, 23-28. 



BIG BUSINESS IN NEWARK 

Joe Marks and his "Youthful Follies" 
had one of the biggest Mondays this sea- 
son at Miner's Empire, Newark, last week. 
The business was hig all week for this 
show. 

At the N. V. A: Ball held Thursday night 
at Paradise Dance Palace in Newark, the 
members of this company who appeared 
were Joe Marks, Eddie Cole, Hazel .AJger, 
Kitty Gamer, 'Mae Leonard. Pearl Wat- 
son, Lelen Lloyd and Larry Clark. 



JOE FREED'S FATHER DEAD 

Leopold Freed, father of Joe Freed, for- 
mer principal comedian of Billy K. Wells' 
"Bubble Bubble" Company, died at his 
home in the Bronx, April 3. Mr. Freed 
was 61 years of age at the time of his 
death. 



ALICE EDWARDS MARRIES 

Charles Wesson, straight man, and Alice 
Edwards, ingenue, of the "Big Jamboree," 
were married in Fairhaven, N. J., on 
Sunday, March 4. 



MARIE GARDEN GOING TO FRANCE 

Marie Garden closed last Saturday with 
the "Sweet Bay Bees" in Scranton and 
sailed Tuesday on the S. S. Conte Rosso 
for France where she will spend a few 
months with her parents. She will return 
to the United States early in August in 
time to start rehearsals for next season. 



WATSON HAS BIG WEEK 

Beef Trust Billy Watson played to over 
$5,500 Holy Week at the Empire, Toronto, 
and to over $7,200 at the Gayety, Detroit, 
the week before. 

Watson and his show have been breaking 
house records since they opened this seasoa 



Keep Smiling — Fmptrc, Toronto, Out., 
Gayety, EnfBlo, 16-21. 



9-14; 



MUTUAL CIRCUIT 

Band Box Review — Lyric. Newark, 9-14. 
Flappers of I9i3 — Star, Brooklyn, 9-14. 
French Model»— Howard. Boston. 9-14. 
Gifls-11-I.i-rarte — Gardes, Buffalo, 9-14. 
Girls from Reno— <>aycty, Brooklyn, 9-14. 
Girls froia Follies — Majestic ScranloD. 3-14. 
HcUp Jake Girls— Olympic, New York, 9-14. 
Jingle Bells— Newburgh, N. Y., 9-11: Pough- 

kccpsie. 12-14. 
Jazz Time Review — Open 9.14. 
Lallin' Thru 1423 — Empire; Hoboken, 9-14. 
Kuddlin* Kittens — Brjadway, Indionapclis, 9-14. 
Midnite Maidens — Majestic, .Mbany, 9-14. 
Miss N. Y., Jr.— Niagara Falls, N. Y., 13-14. 
Pat White and His New llig Shows — Alajcstie, 

WUkes-Barxe, 9-I-t. 
Round the T».A%n— Ciycty, Louisville, 9-14. 
Step Alons — Per pier, Cincinnati, 9-14. 



OUR 
NEW 
HOME 



EiUbluheil 1900 
ProBbv Carefnllr 
H*^::;::- Had* aad Fmi\h- 
rullf KepL 



L.. & SONS, Inc. 

lh« wrll known and BEST TlicatrMl Clcanera of the Eakt, annottncc tbat ihtjr ar« oakbu a ipeeUUf 
of cleaalss and repairio| Theatrical Coilimie* and also fit ume. Wa at»o djre facMo aad alipper* to 
match roitanm. 

Yoon for good work and prompt tcrrlcet 



L. BLAU A SONS, Idc, 151 Avenue Q Nav York Ctt^ 



BILLY KOUD 



PRODUCER 

COLUMBIA THEATRE BLDG, NEW YORK. 



TELEPHONE BRYANT N14 




STARS OF BURLESQUE 



CAI.IF'ORNIA 



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BEN JOSS, HAkmr BART. JIM HAU, 



This trio is the beat all araond slnffinff trio la WTTH 

burlesque and has been (or yeub They arc not BAHNEY 

alone a fine sinBinc trio^ but ai« y*rr ▼alnable to any pX SUkStSn_ 

show, u each one of the boyi can pUra part. They FOLLIES OF 

prove this all throocfa tha show. SOD— CU^sr. THE DAT 



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nt B Muxa ouK 

TO OCT 



AGAIN 










THE PHONOGRAPH STAR 
Bariesque** Beat Blues Singer 



LYDIA HARRIS 



Dolnc Spndaltr with 

JIMMIE COOPER and his "BEAUTY REVUE" 

QqJuqiIiIb Cipcuit 




HARRY ANDE-RSON 

wUs P«d[ ft Kdb HMUt Hop Cbl 



BETTY BURROUGHS 



DAINTY. DASHINC SOUBRETIE 



JHOUE COOPER'S BEAUTY UVUK 



IN/IIUY IMI 

INCEWlrf-aO UBHEl It^ -J-TOWN FOLLIES' 



April 11, 1923 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



25 



99 



JOE SAMUELS, SOCIETY'S FAVORITE ORCHESTRA LEADER, 

AND ONE OF THE MOST POPUUUt RECORDING ARTISTS IN THE COUNTRY, IS FEATURING 

MY MOTHErS LULLABY 

LITTLE BETTY GULICK'S WONDERFUL FOX-TROT MOTHER BALLAD 
SEND FOR YOUR COPY NOW AND GET IT BY RETURN MAIL. SPECIAL QUARTETTE ARRANGEMENT READY. 

1658 BROADWAY TRIANGLE MUSIC PUB. CO.. Inc. NEW YORK 



"LAUGHIN' THRU," AT 
THE STAR, BRIGHT 

AND PLEASING 

Manbeim and Vail's "Laugbin* Thru.'* which 
played the Star last week under the title of 
"Chicle Chicle Girls," proved a very pleamioB en- 
tertainment Thursday afternoon. • The pro- 
gram Slates that the show was sugcd bj Al 
Golden and the numbers by Betty Abbott 

This Khow has a fine cast of principals and a 
fart dancing chorus, 

George Shellon is the principal comedisn, por- 
traying a '*trainp." Shelton is a fast worker 
and a dcver little fellow. He works more on 
the st>-Ie of Bobby Qark than anyone now in 
burlesque. He is snappy, witty and amusing. 
His makeup is clean, but he wears the'old misfit 
clothes. 

Gcnrge Broadhurst is doing a "dope" comedy 
role. He is vrry amusing in this part and pijr- 
trays it well. We Itked the style of comedy, 
however, he did cnrlicr in the season in another 
show on this circuit. 

Fattl Ryso, a new man to us. is doing a 
''Dutch*' role and his dialect is good. 

Al Golden, who produced the show, is the 
straight man. Golden is a good talker and has 



AUractions at City Theatres 



BELASCO 

DAVID BELASCO 

Lenore Ulric 
KIKI ^ 



as 



A 

br 



Studr 
PIcard 



B. F. lU&'s 

PALACE 



BraadwaT and 47tli St. 
Mat. Da&7 at 2 P. M. 
2S, SO and 75c. Every 
niaht, 25, SO, 75, $1, flJO 

PRE-EMINENT 

INTERNATIMrAI. ENTERTAINMENT 

ALL STAR PROGRAMME 
BROOKLYN THEATREs" 

Casino Theatre 
Wine, Woman & Song 

Nazi W««k — RADIO GIRLS 

Empire Theatre 
"LETS GO"' 

Next We«k— BIG JAMBCHtEE 



Jmr ar. Fnltnt St. Mat. 
Dally. T«L TiiascU 497 



STAR 
Flappers of 1923 

N«rt Week— HELLO, JAKE GIRLS 

Gayety Theatre T 
Girk from Reno 

Next We^— LAFnN* THRU 



Thioap Ave. 
Bnadwar 



line control of the Erislifih language. lie is a 
clauy dr=uer and wears his dothev well. 

Peaches Ponton, in unusually attractive blonde 
of an ing^ue type, delighted the audience with 
her numbers. She put them over cleverly. She 
.-il.vi did nicely in the bits. Miss Ponton dis- 
played pretty costumes. 

Itetty Abbott, a peppery soubrette, danced her- 
mH into favor. She is a very plasing looking 
little g-lrl, whs has several styles jf dancing 
which she offers during the show. Her nunabers 



n\\ 50 over and she knows how. to work them up. "■ Apni Zlst 



last Saturday night at the Gayety. 
Kansas City. 

"Folly Town" closes April 14th at 
the Gayety, Kansas City. 

"Hello, Good Times" closes at the 
Gayety, Kansas City, the week of April 
28th. 

The" "Broadway Flappers" close at 
the Empire, Toledo, Saturday night. 



W. 44tb St. Etbs., 8J0 
Mats. Thnra. & Sat. 2J0 



Her dresses are befitting ts her style. 

KTargie Catlin is also doing the soubrette role 
and covered herself with glory in all she at-, 
tempted. Miss Catlin is looking younger and 
better than she has in a long time and her work 
is M-ortli while. The dres«es worn by this young 
lady are very liecnmins. 

The 'Trench" bit, done by Shelton, Golden 
and Miss Catlin, went over nicely early in the 
show. 

In the "dope" bit Broadhurst stood ouL He 
was assirted by Golden and Shelton. 

"How to Make Love" bit was given by Shel- 
ton, Ryan nnd Mis Pouton and it pleased. 

Shelton and Ryan did n specialty in (ne talk- 
ing about the "dying" bit. 

lu the "manager's office" .Kcne, Job's McCar- 
thy played the legit and did it well. .All the 
principals tnck part in this ^cene. Two chorus 
girls did a sister act and put over b hard shce 
dancing specialty. Droadhurst, in his singing 
and dancing specialty, scored. Betty Abbott 
went big with hrr Russian dancing specialty. 

"I.aughin* Thru" is a good show and one of 
the best tbM has been at the Star in scuie time. 

Sid. 



at the 
night. 



American Girls" will close 
Colonial, Oeveland, Saturday 
April 21st. 

"Step Lively Girls" closed at the 
Grand Worcester, March 31st, 

Fratik Finney Revue closes at the 
Casino, Boston, April 14th. 

"Youthful Follies" will close at Hur- 
tig and Seamons, New York, Saturday 
night, April 21st. 

The "Reeves Show" closes at the 
Gayety, Montreal, Saturday night of 
this week. 



COU CIRCUIT CLOSING 

(Continued from page 19) 

23rd and close at Hurtig and Seamon's 
the week of April 30th. 

"Hippity Hop" is at the Empire, 
Providence, the week of April 23 and 
closes at the Gayety, Boston, the week 
of April 30th. 

"Greenwich Village Revue" plays 
Hurtig and Seamons the week of April 
23 and closes at Miner's Bronx the week 
of April 30th. 

"Wine, Woman and Song" will be 
at the Orpheum, Paterson, the week of 
April 23rd and closes the following 
week at the Empire, Providence. 

The "Radio Girls" play Miner's Em- 
pire in Newark the week of April 23rd, 
Empire, Brooklyn, the week of April 
30th and Miner's Bronx the week of 
May 7th. 

"Bubble Bubble" will play the Em- 
pire, Brooklyn, the week of .\pril 23 
and close at Miner's Newark the week 
of April 30th. 

"Giggles" plays the Gayety, Boston, 
week of April 23rd, Columbia, New 
York, week of April 30th and closes 
at the Casino, Brooklyn, the week of 
May 7th. 

Beef Trust Billy Watson will play 
the Yorkville, New York, the week of 
April 23rd and close its season at the 
Orpheum, Paterson, the week of April 
30th. 

The shows that will close before the 
regular season or have already closed 
are "Keep Smiling," which closes at the 
Gayety, Buffalo, the week of April 16th. 

"Town Scantlals" closed at the Sur 
and Garter, Chicago, last Saturday 
night. "Temptations of 1923" closed at 
the Gayety, Kansas City, on March 31st. 

Jack Reid's " ... - 



••FOLLIES" RUN UPSETS COMEDIANS 

Gallagher and Shean are very much 
perturbed over the lengthy nm of "Zieg- 
feld Follies" at the New Amsterdam The- 
atre, as the run has caused them much in- 
convenience. When they signed a contract 
with Ziegfeld it was to appear in the 
"Follies" during its run in New York. 
They figured at the time that the run 
woald end in December or January at the 
latest, and they made plans for the early 
spring which they have not been able to 
carry out, due to the fact that the show 
is still running and will continue to do so 
for at least two months. They have made 
efforts to obtain a release of their contract 
from Ziegfeld, but the latter informed them 
that their contract called for their appear- 
ance during the run of the show, and that 
there was hardly any possibility of the 
show closing before Jime 1. At that time 
the contract which they held with him for 
the season of 19Z2-23 will expire. 

They in the meantime have snned a con- 
tract with the Fox Film Corporation 
which called for their appearance in films 
during April and May. They were to 
have gone to Hollywood to ftilfill diit con- 
tract, and on accotmt of the refusal of 
Ziegfeld to let the comedians ont the con- 
tract has been set back until June. 

Upon the completion of their film work 
they will immediately return to New York, 
where they will begin rehearsal in "Steal- 
ing the Town," a musical show which 
Aaron Hoffman has written for them, 
which will be produced by George lA^te ./ 
in September. 



VARIETY AGENT FAILS 

London, April 8. — ^The first meeting of 
the creditors under the failure of Mr. Jack 
Goodson, the variety agent, was held at 
the Court of Bankruptcy last week. Mr. 
Goodson carried on business under the 
name of the Co-Operattve Pari-Mutucl 
Society, the main business of vi^ich was 
to exploit plays and revues. His failures 
overbalanced his successes, Goodson as- 
cribing his failure to the general depres- 
sion in the theatre world. His liabilities 
are roughly estimated in the neighborhood 
of 3,000 potmds, 2,000 of which are due 
Record Breakers" closed on theatrical ventures. 



LOEW FORMS NEW CIRCUTT 

The Marctis Loew chain of theatres has 
organized an additional circuit of thirty., 
weeks, which will be operated under the 
same policy as the Warfield theatre in San 
Francisco, playing a feature motion picture 
in conjunction with concert artists, special- 
ly devised production turns and tableaux. 
This circuit is to be a subsidiary of Locw's, 
Inc, and will in no way interfere with the 
vaudeville circuit. 

Walter Keefe, who was formerly eastern, 
representative for the Pantages circnit, has 
been appointed to head the booking o£Scc 
' for the motion picture bouse circuiL The 
circuit is composed of the larger Loew 
motion picture theatres, and a combination 
of independent houses throughout the 
coimtry which will make up a consecutive 
route of thirty weeks from Coast to Coast. 
N'ew England, and the South are also to 
be included. The route will have- two 
houses in New York City and two in 
Brookl^. Several weeks of time are 
also being arranged in and around Chicago. 

Marcus Loew left New York last week 
on a tour of inspection of the houses whkh 
have been combined for the new circuit 
and is now touring the South. 

Walter Keefe's offices will be situated in 
the Loew State Building in New York. As 
yet, no franchises have been issued, bnt 
will be shortly. In all probablity, a great 
many agents now booking with the Loew 
vaudeville booking offices, will be per- 
mitted to submit special features or artists 
whom they may secure as clients. 

COLUMBIA KEEPS WINTER POUCY 

The Columbia Theatre in Far Rockaway 
will continue under its winter policy of mo- 
tion pictures of the first half of Uie week 
and vaudeville for the last half only, instead, 
of changing to a split-week vaudeville 
policy, as usual, during the summer. 

The one change which nay be made 
will be on the opening thy, for at proent, 
vaudeville acts play ttie house for Friday, 
Saturday and Similay, getting paid for 
four days' work. During the summer tt 
is more than probable Aai the opening 
day will be shifted to Thnrsilay. 



Thm Gaardian of m 
Good CcmplmxUm 




STEINS MBKE UP 




HO^DS THE CCNTBE 
or THE STAGE 



26 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 11. 1923 



LEN CARLE '"o DOLLY INEZ 



P^eaent Their Own Mea— "A DOORSTEP ROMEO" 



PLAYING B. F. KEITH CIRCUIT 



Direction ROSE & CURTIS 



VAUDEVILLE BILLS 

(CmMmW from pmtt 21) 



ELIZABEXE. H. J. 
(Bccond H*U)— L> Tine * Bits— SalUru * 
U7>n— Vu Drke A VIncle— Orlffln Twin*— New- 



SASBAB MO. 

Tb* OUdlaUn — WIlMB & Addle — El Cota - 
Walter Biowtr — Chor Uiic Foo— Wiltcr BnwaF' 
f^— .11.- Vet. Bud. 



utLttrun XEH. 
NeiMB'* CitluA— Ju BotilBl — Wnton * 
— BajBold*! Opes Co. 



pou ciRcurr 

Wadt of Apia 9, 1923 
mooKFOBX, oon. 

r»ll'( (SMOod HUf)— DowBln* * Cl«rid»»— 
nahattr * atonlsc — I. PnseU Jc Jehni Hurt 
Ckaabr— ▼■iMtln* Oiebtatn. 

Taba* (BccoDd HaU) — mak dc O. La Ttoni— 
Bntjs dnuilaftiam — ItfiralBe ft TrmlBor — EUltb 
lUIafltm— TlToU * La v*n — BerDolda * 



con. 

raliM (BMOBd HalO— Kefr * zatlcB— BaU ft 
LsnalM — Cnattooa — Caledonian Poor — Babe 
Wricta Bme. 

OkalM (Becottt BalO— Wolf SUtan ft Addr — 
BT-r ^ Baael Tangtniw- Iftrm Stalriar ft Band — Fox 
ft Bluaa roar f ..n-j Stan. 

xKSiDzv. oora. 

VaU't (Bemud Halt)— Cair ft Brar— BaimooT 
raop— Waraa. lUtttaall ft Caadr— Al Btrikec— Cir- 
aep Berne. 

ACTS 

VT VALENTINl 

Inii g a n i« l n | C n n l l iili l l y 

ACTS "~ *" ACTS 



ixw Hftvzv, oonr, 

Falaan (Bemul Ball)— ArtleUe Tieat— Allen ft 
CanflaU— SekaeSer WTm'n ft Co. — Hodce ft Low- 
ell—Eddie For Famllr — Maisaret FonL 
■OBAXXOS, PA. 

VDli'a (Beeood HaU) — ^Tlin* Odd Chape — Oddl- 
tlm eC IBZB — Kaowlca ft White — Anond the Cor- 
Mr Otnir ft L ae Clara Tbeodom Ttne. 




Palaaa (Beceod Half)- Tbe YWUna— Oeae OU- 
TW ft CO.— Moml Kalama ft Co.— Uarka ft WUecn 
— I^nlae Lot«1x ft Co. 

wATERBmiT, conr. 

Xalaoa (Second HalO — Mlecabna — Leon ft Dawn 
— O'HeU ft nookett- Ttddy Claln Co.— Zeck ft 
BaiylolDll. 

WnXBS-BlRBZ. Pft. 
Pall'a (Seeottl Ball) — Splendlt ft PactBcr— Wm. 
O. DonSeld— Fiwtcla ft Bome— lenr ft Her Piano 
— Olrta Znlm ft Dieli Mebel Ford. 

WOBCXSTEB, KASa. 
Xalt'a (Becoid Halt)- WUbnr ft Ijle— Kelao 
Bna.— De Uale— Joe Laorle, Jr. — Ibaeb'a Eater- 
-TWaak ft Dean. 



■MX. TaJiOli, H. T. 
(Second Half)— Baell ft ABen— Ben Berale ft 
Baod — McodT" ft Doacan — Paul Nolan ft Co. — 
Bteren ft Lorcjoj. 

HEWABX, H. t. 

Kellnm ft O'Dare — Tlacent Lopes ft Band — Irene 
Boeatdo— Fitda ft Anthonr — CoDpUoent* of the 
-Bobble Cacboone — WUUna ft Hocbcn. 

SOHZBEOZABT, JT. T. 
(Benod Halt)— Wlnton Broa.— Markel ft Oar— 
KennedT ft Darlea — Be Tonnell- Blllj Beard — 
Bdltb KeOer ft Co. — FVleeo Berenadera. 

nOT, H. T. 
(Second HaU)— Archie ft Oertle Falla — W^etb ft 
WjniM Tenlta (Joald— PollT ft Oi— Folwo ft 
Denor Oicbettn. 

TonzBB, V. T. 
(Second Half)— Lrdla Birrr— SulUn— Bloom ft 
Bber— Fted Harrleon ft Co. — Land ot Tanfo. 



B. F. KEITH BOOKING EXCHANGE 
Wack of April 9, 1923 

BEW TOBX OITT 
Bntdwar— BDtli Boje— AaatiaUtn Woodcbop- 
pen — Ctaonc Wha Thn« — Waske — Cbaa. Motattl 
ft Co. — Hall. Drmlnle ft Brlce — Wm. Edmonds ft 
Co.— Uttle Toabt ft Co. 

Feidham (Second Bait)— 43at Edward* Bei 
Jack CUSord— 01(a Cook— Edwards & Edwards. 

Jaffenea (Second HaU) — Ferry CoTWtj — Bilt- 
more Band— Claode ft Marlon— Jan* ft Wbaleo— 
Martha Pr7or — Kelson ft Parish — Marlon EeUr. 

Becent (Second Halt) — Pinto ft Bojle — Koran 
ft Ooildner^Ted ft Betty Beal7. 

CoUienra (Second Bait)— Carroll ft SedleT— Jost 
Oot of Knlckcra— Holland ft Oden— Powell ft 
Brown. 

FraaklTS (Second Halt) — Oordoo ft Ford — Ilm 
McWUllam*— BeUe Baker— B;an, Weber ft Bjan. 

Bamlltsn — Belle Baker— Emie Oileman ft Band 
— SnUr ft HoDiblon — Ted ft Bett7 Healr — Korac* 
& (joldner Tost Ont ot Knlcken — Edwards ft Ed- 
ward*— Eddie HUIer ft Co. 

BBOOKLYB, R. T. 

Hatbnsh (Second Halt) — Lewi* ft Dodj — Brown 
ft Wblttaker — Doooran A Ke« — Stanlej- ft Bnms 
—Booth ft Nina— Edith (Haaper ft Bot*. 

Prwpeu t (Second Halt) — CratU ft Balej— Torch 
Bearers — Fr*d Grar ft Co. — Meetaan Newman. 

Blrara (Second Halt)— Belle Baker^-Caraon ft 
WUlard — Clark ft Bergman — Borco— Manrtce Dia- 
mond ft Co. — Bill ft Blondj. 

Oieenpolnt (Second Half) — Bnbln ft Ball— Jack 
WUson ft Co. — Seren Glasgow Maid*— Jack LltUe 
— IM ft Cranston. 

Far Bockaway (Second Half)— Manllo Broa. — 
Harana Band — Adalalde ft Bngbes— SnllT ft 
Boochton — Learltt ft I«ckwood— Moran ft Mack. 

Handeima'i, Coney Uand (Second Bait)- Mon- 
tana — Soothem Poor — Victor Mooie Co. — Lewis ft 
Roffera — Harry Eantman Co. 



F. F. PROCTOR 
W««k of Apia 9, 1923 

HEW TOBX CITK 

Fifth Arenaa (Second Half)— Tom Kelly- 
lloai* ft Freed— De Lyle ft Alda— Olga ft Nicbolaa 
—Carl ft Inea. 

•M. Btiaet (Second Halt)— Nelson ft Barry 
Bam— Nihla— Manreen Englln— Tom ft Dolly 
Waid. 

nth Btreet (Second Halt)— Nathano Bme.- 
Cecilia Weatoa ft Co. — Cnpld'a CIsaenpa — ^Threo 
Aadeea Qlzla— Walih. Becd ft Walsh. 

mtk BtiMt (Bccoad Half)— Brahm* FOm^Loc- 
nar flirTa Amy Dean ft Co. — Morrmy, Klssen ft 
Col — nnma Earl ft Co. — Tooiv ft Wheeler. 

A£BAHT, H. T. 
(Beeoad Half) — La Fleor ft Portia— Heath ft 
SpetllBB— Herbert Denton ft Co.— Bedfflond ft 
Wen* — Bobby Pandera noopa. 

HBaliatamtgsiiartttialmv" 
Ciiwialiia'iily it die 
AMDUCAN LABORATORIES for 

aaorriFic hair cul-^ire 

SaW.SdtbSt. StdtadT. N.Y.atF 
WrUmfmrp^mtotrm^ltM mitJ InfammHan 



ONE 
DOLLAR 



MADISON'S I O 
BUDOETNOsI D 

blest and greatest issue; and thaf* 
COm« same Contents tDclude an almost 
endlea* assortment of bright sure-fire 
monolognes, acts for two males, and for 
male and female, pandio, 2D0 (ingle gag*, 
minstrel fiist parts with finale, a sketch 
for foar people, a tabloid farce for nine 
chaiacten, etc Send yoor dollar to 
I. J. K. HF.n. Biilnmi Mmmav el 

MADisaiirs BUDcer. iia tu7 At» 

■ma. Near Yesk. 



BIHOBAXIOB, H, T. 
(Beeood Half) — Gold ft snnatalne — Adams ft 
Thomaa — For PIty'a Sake — Slater* Amette — Girl 
In Moon— Flake ft Lloyd. 

BOBTOS, XABB. 

Boiton — Bnsbman ft Bayoe — Cablll ft Bomalae 
— Maker ft Bedford — Aliman ft Howard — BUdns, 
Fay ft Elklns. 

Sesllay 8«naie— Meira Sbter*— Uarie ft Uarlow 
— Claire Vincent ft Co. — Innls Bros. — Pink's 
Uq^ea. 

WaahlifttaB Street (Second Halt)- WelU ft 
Bott — ^Alexander ft Flelda — London Stefven. 

BBASFOBO. PA. 
(Second Halt)— BoaaeU ft ° Hayes— Lew WUaon 
—Nellie T. MIchoI*— Veata Wallace Co. 

BBOOXTOB. XABS. 

Btnad (Second BaU) — Worden Broa.— Ftoslnl — 
HatiT Ii. Cooper ft Co. — Jone* ft Bea— Danny 
Dogan ft Co. 

Gordon'* (Second H«U)— BlU ft HnU— Victor 
Hyde'* Follle*. 

OAXBBIDOB, ICAS8. 
,'*Osatnl Bqnara (Second Half) — Blanche Sher- 
wood ft Bro. — Whea Lore la Toong — Lane ft Har- 
per — Andenoa & TreL 

OABTOH, OHIO 
Gardnor ft Aubrey — Manuel Bomain — Morlel ft 
Phyllis — John B. Hymer Co. — Kelso ft Demont — 
Frank Work Co. 

OAXaOBSALE, PA. 
(Second Halt)— Frldkln ft Bhoda— Brown ft 
Barrow*— Will* ft Bogeta— Virginia Ser. 



AUS3R0WS, M. T. 
(Secvid Half) — Brent Hayes — Pantheon Singer* 
— Eenncy ft HoUla. 

AMBTEBDAlt B. T, 
(Second BaU) — Spoor ft Parsons — Mildred 
Parker — Blng Tangle — Al. ft F. stedmaiL 

ASBUBT PASS, K. J. 
(Second Half)— Clown Seal— John Gelger^Howe 
ft Howe — Balnbow SLx. 

AUBTIBH, It, T. 
(Second Halt)— Tbe SterUnga— Jones ft Lelgb — 
Wm. Slsto— Plasa EntertaUer*. 

BAirOOB, ME. 
(Second Half) — Boma Ooo — Eonlce Gllmsn — 
Murray ft Gerrlsh— Bank Brown ft Co. — Noel 
Lester ft Co. 

BATOBKE, H. J. 
(Second Belt) — Man Off Ice Wagon — CorrcU 
Weston ft Co. — Tom Howard ft Lloyd — ^The 
Faynea. 



OHXBTEB, PA. 
(Second Half)— The Benten — Derlth Bnasell ft 
Co. — Copes & Button — Burke, Barton ft Burke — 
The Diamonds — Betas ft Wills. 

OLABKSBDBO, W. VA. 
(Second Half) — Weston ft Young — Nan* — Cree- 
don ft D*Tls — Three Kanasawa. 

EABTOH, PA. 
(Second Half)— Bailey & Porter — Eddie Caaaa- 
dy — Stemard'a' Uldgeu. 



K, V. T. 

(Second Bait) — Wardel ft LaCoate — Morris ft 
Townee — Morgan ft Wooley Co. — Johnny Murphy 
— Syncopated Seren. 

PALL BTVEB, MASS. 

(Second Bolt)— Lcaby Bra* Joe Boberti — 

Sbaron Steptacna ft Co.— Ben Welch — Connor'a 

Bemo. 

I'lTOUHIIBO, MASS. 
Onmmlng'a (Second Bait)— Ketch ft WUm* — 
Elaine ft Marshall- Bometown FoUlea. 

OmUABTOWB', PA. 
Orpbeimi — B*der LaValle — Cook ft Oatman — l%e 
Awkward Age — Oemamt ft Collatte — Weber ft 
Bldser— Maty Bayna Co. — Boyat Gaecoynea. 

GLOTEBSVnXE, H. T. 
(Second Bait)— Desso Better — Wopler ft Darla 
— Maale. Helen ft Daisy. 

OBEEHSBUBG. PA. 
(Second Halt)— Victoria— WUlIama ft Howard- 
Arthur Howard Co. — Victor Gaff — ^Tbe Glided 
Cage. 

HABBIBBlma, PA. 
(Second Half) — Daum ft Scott— Reynalda ft 
White — Vcs Meaaa No— Lee ft Maao- BaU ft 
Bek. 

HAVEBHnX, MASS. 
(Second Bilt)— B*iele ft BedHeld- Murdock ft 
Kennedy — Lelgb DeLacy ft Co. — Al Sbayne — Fred'a 
Seala. 

HAZELXOH, PA. 
(Second Bolt) — J. ft J. Bums — Betty Donn — 
Brgottl ft Herman. 

HOBDELL, H. T. 
(Second Halt) — Haz«l Harrington— Dmmmond 
ft White— Faliy Talc Folllea— Tan Baldwin Trio. 

HOLYOSE, MASS. 
(Second Half)- Kane Marlanettea— George Mack 
— Grey ft Old Bose. 

ITEAOA. v. T. 
(Second naif) — T.or«tta — Georcla Iloward — Bart 
ft M. Gardner — Nixon ft Saon — Owcns-Kelly- 
Syncopstora. 

JAMESTOWE, E. Y. 
(Second Bait)— Pot I'ourrl— Wallace Oalrin— 
Tunes ft Stcpa— Earl ft Matthews — Harry Kahne. 

ELLIS ANTRES 
THEATRICAL AGENCY 

1658 Brudway. Soite 617, New Toil 

Artists and Chorus Girls 
call or write 



JOHESTOWE, PA. 
(Second Bait) — Carney ft Itoae — Stranded — 
Johnny Beynolds — Jo Jo Dooley. 

LAEOABTEB, PA. 
(Second Uslt)— Howsrd Nlcbols— StlllweU ft 
Frascr — Briscoe ft Banb — Demo Sister* Tblbanlt 
ft Cody. 

LAWSEHCE, MASS. 
(Second Halt)— Ed. ft Ida TIndell— Elsie White 
— LlddeU ft Gibson— Norwood ft BaU— Buckrldge 
ft Caaey. 

LEWIBTOV, ME. 
Kuslo BaU (Second Bait)— Joe D'Ller— Martini 
ft DcVoe— Sallo ft Boblee— Maud EUet ft Co. 

MHO BBAEOB, E. J. 
(Second Bait)— Paolette ft Bay— Brown ft De- 
Mont — Lew Dockatader— Chong ft Moey. 

LYEE, XABS. 
(Second Halt)— Olbaon ft Price— Eaatmaa ft 
Hooie— Bhodes ft Wataoo— Fifty Mllea tram 
Broadway. 

XOXEEaPOBT, PA. 
(Second Halt)- Austin ft C^le— Leonard ft St. 
John — Singing Three — Barrlaon ft Darling— Blm 
ot Dance Bit*. 

XAEOHBBXEB, E. H. 
(Second Bait)— Dore Sisters — Ann Suter — Ar- 
thur DeVoy ft Co.— WUllams ft Taylor— Bowers, 
Walter* ft Crocker. 

ICEAOVILU, PA. 
(Second Halt) — Casa ft Leho — Marie Sparrow — 
Coakley ft Subera— Eddie SUnley Co. 

MOBTBZAL, OAE, 
Walters ft Walters— Dixie Poor — Alt. Farrell— 
Tbo*. J. Byan ft Co. — Dorla Duncan — BoUand ft 
Bae. 

MOBBIBTOWE, E. J. 
Dolye ft Chtystte — Mack ft Stanton — Ida May 
Chadwlck Dad. 

EAETICOKE, PA. 
Betber Trio — Buby Bojce — Babcock ft Dolly — A 
Virginia Bomance. 

VEW BEDFOBD, MASS. 
(Second Bait)- WUlUm ft DaUy— MUlard ft 
Marlln— Jane Dillon— Wllaton Broa.— California 
Bamblero. 

DEW BBITAIE, COEE. 
(Second Belt) — Bany Watklns— Horlen ft Di>- 
nn— Fred LaBelne Co. 

EEW BBTIEBWICK. E. J, 
(Second BalC)— Married Again— Willie SoUr. 

VEw LOESOE, oomr. 

(Secoad Bait)— Boyal Danes— FUke ft FslboD— 
Melody Sextette— Mel Klee— Uites Broa. 

EOBWICH, COEE. 
(Secoad Balf) — Cslrln ft O'Connor — Four Mad- 
capa — Hal Sprlsgford— Lemater ft Smith, 

EOBWICH, E. Y. 
Harris & Vaagbn — Florence Beyoolds. 

PASSAIO, E. 7. 
(Second Bait)— Melodlea ot Vesterday— Jonea ft 
Johnson — Arthur Wbltelaw — The Lore Usee — 
Boyal Purple Girls. 

■ PATEBBOE, E. J. 
(Second Balf)— Cecilia Wnton. 

PAWTUOECT, B. L 
(Second Halt) — Valentine ft BeU — Steren* ft 
DrtmeU — Harry Stewart Co. — Lew Bice— Eape ft 

Dotton. 

T> iTTT aT>rT T WT /\ PA, 

Eayatono— Bcctor ft Pala — May Fraada — BlUy 
Hngb ft Co.— rem ft Marie. 

Wm. Penn (Second Bait)— Boy ft Boyer— Me- 
llnda ft Dade — Vaughn Comfort Co. — ^Xhe Shar- 

rocki. ■ 

PXTTBBVBOB, PA. 

Jim PeUx— Kamplaln ft Bell— Three Bernard 
Glrla — ^Townacnd WUbur Co. — Joaepblne Barmon — 
Bobbctte Enter— Art Learning- Lew Nelson Co. 

Sbaridan Square (Second Halt)- Sager Mldgeley 
ft Co. — Williams ft Dawson — Dayton ft Palmer- 
Anita. 



DRY CLEANED 

Theatrical Gowns aad CoatoiBM 
Repaired and Dry Orantil 

OVERNIGHT 

We Work While Yoo Siotp 
Oown* CtSod (or Altar 1km tew 
DelWend Befcr* Noos Km» Dur. 

PHONE CiRCLE 9104 
OVERNIGHT CLEANERS 

Kt 7B6 7lli Al 



April II, 1923 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



27 



PITTSrCELS, XABB. 
(SccoiHl Hiir)— McDonild A Oakm— Jnnsle 
Bnniralow — Aleiaader Elmore — Helodj Bene. 

TLMUmEUt, IT. 7. ■ 
(Second Halt) — Lynch Ic Zeller — Whalen & Uc- 
Sbane— Field* & Fink — Ann* Held, Jr. 

BEASnCa, PA. 
(Second naif) — Valdare & Cooke — Furman & 
-Brana— Juvenile Frolic* — AUman & BarreT — 
Thra* KIrklllo*. 

BASATOOA, H. T. 
Hanly Bn*. — An^el A Puller — Crane, llay ft 
^rane. 

SBEBASSOAH, VA. 
(Second Half) — Hanaon Duo— Zelda Bantley — 
^nrtb & Soatb — Fanclce. 

BO. AI>A]fB, XAaa. 

rowdl— Cbetter ft DeTere— Neel UcKlsleT— 
3-'onr Byron Glrla — Emma Baymond Co. 

80. HOBWAUC. COBS, 
Clayton ft (^yton — Nan TraTellnc — i£n. Georv* 
I'rlmrow — RelUy ft Bosen— Eric Pbllllp* Co. 

BTAKFOBO, COHB. 
(Second Halt)— Bolden ft Otab*m— Bernard' ft 
4inT — Dalton & Cnic— TroTito— Boloff ft Elton. 

BTEUBEBTILLE, OHIO 
Bolfe'a BoTue. 

BTaAOVBE, H. T. 
(Second Half) — Great Jotinaon — Kennedy & 
Kruner — El Cleve — Dawaon Biatera Co. — BUon 
City Poor — Rlter ft Knappe. 

TBEBTOV, ir. J. 
(Second Halt) — John 3. Bloody ft Co. — Prince** 
Nat 1^1 Tal— The Drue Clerk— Uamptoo ft Blake 
— Joita Mar*b*U RcTlew. 

UTJOA, H. T. 
Colonial (Second Half)— CllSord ft Gray— Jack 
JlcGowan — Hiomton & Squlr** — Marine ft Mortln 
— Shuro Bulow* Co. 

WAXEBTOWB,' H. T. 
(Second Half) — Jean Arnold — O'Brien & Jo- 
aepbine — Howard ft Bracbman — Bcaaer ft Irwin — 
lUldred Andr* ft Co. 

uiuviM nrn VA. 
(Second Half) — Samatcd ft Marlon — Helen Mo- 
Tvttl — Walnuley & Keating — Jamea J. Morton — 
Bacbman'a Band. 

WHITE PLAIH8, H. Y. 
Lynn (Second Half) — EUiabeth Brlce — Bc*al* 
Rempel & Co.— Lee l^dward* — Douglas ft Earl— 
llitrry Titiiil* — Ward Broe. 

SCENERY AND COSTUMES 

FOR SAL£ OR RENT 
Alao Electrical ESecta and Praoa. 
ELLIS ANTKES THEATRICAL ENTERPRISES 
let Broadway, Suits SIT, New York 

WrUUNOTON, DEI,. 
(Stmnd Half)— AleDHOO- Marion GIbney— Marie 
ft Add Clark— Butler ft Parker— Blanche ft Jlm- 
ole Crelgbton — Bronson ft Edwarda. 

Toaic, PA. 
Open Honi* (Socond Half) — Mammy Jinny 
Band— Monde— Taylor Howard ft Them— Barrya ft 
Wolford* — Jatri* ft Harrioon. 

YOUBOBTOWB, OEQO 
(Second Half) — Barret ft Fomum— Claudia Colp- 
mao — Tbank YoD. Doctor-rltoxy Ia Bocca. 

ATLABTA AXD BtBIUIIOHAM 
llarr.v la.Marr & Co. — Janl* ft Cti*plow — TJlllan 
Herldn & Co. — iluntinc ft KrancI* — Goaamnn Sl*> 
-ter* ft Foley. 

BXRJOHOHAX AND ATLABTA 

Mhiii: & SDjUcr — Uobbe & Stark — McCormMck ft 
Welljice — Hall ft Dexter — Jimmy Joy* Entertain- 
on. 

BATOH BOUOE ABD BHBEVEPOBT 

Vee & Tully — Hnllcn ft D*y — Southern Berue — 
Howard ft Lewi* — U*n*ko Jap*. 

BEW OBI.EABB ABD KOBILE 
L.ynQ ft Thompeon — Gene Morgan — Sampiton ft 
Douglaa — Pl*ano ft Llndauer — Princeoa WaUetka. 

MOBILE ABS BEW ORLEABB 
Merrltt ft Cougblin — Bernard ft Merrltt- Darli 
ft Sandford — Elm City Four — Ilongflelda. 

BASETILLE ABD LOXJlflVILIX 
John Begay ft Co. — Fulton ft Burt — Gordon ft 

Day. 

LOnlBTTLLE ABI> BASRVILIX 
Klllott ft Latour — Flaehe* from Songlaod. 
TAJIPA, ST. PETEBSBURO ABB OBLAHDO 
Fraofc Wilson— Ray, Snow ft Norlne— Faye ft 
Donnelly — Carlton ft Bellew — I>orothy Byton'a 
Benie. 

CHARLOTTE ABD ROABOKE 

Joaepb DIskny — SUone ft Squire* — Movie 

Maaque*. * , 

BOABORE ABD CHARLOTTE 
The Mclotyre* — DcGi>'un ft Adnme — Hyama & 
ET*n* — Ed Lowry — Seven Brown Girls. 

RICHMOBD ABD BORFOLR 

Bob Anderson ft Pony — Velerle Bergere ft Co. — 
Green ft Pnrker — Texas Comi-dy Four. 

BORFOLR ABS RICHHOBD 
Tan Arakl Trio — Lirry Comer — Laces ft IaUIcn 
— Oscar Lomine. 



BABKynxE, iBnr. 

Van ft Tyaon — Dorothy Bamer — Princeton Five. 

CHATIABOOOA ABD BStOXVZLU: 
The. Brills— The Roiellae— Melody ft Steps- 
amIllDg Billy Mason — Holman Bro*. 

WIBBTOH BAIXX, B. O. 
(Second H*lf) — Coraeli, Leon* ft Zippy — Comlw 
ft Nerln* — Robt. Bellly ft C^. — Bena Arnold ft 
Co.— Wilfred DoBola. 

WEST PALX BEACH ABD MIAMI 
'Beege ft Qnepco— Jack Sidney — QUfoyle ft 
Lange— W. ft M. Roger* — Burt ft HolUworth. 

OBEEBVILIZ ABS AUOVBTA 
Ch*rtc* l,edec*r — Brown & lATell — Browning ft 
Darl* — EmtM ft Alton — Doily Darl* Rome. 

JAORBOBTIUE ABS BAYABBAH 

Dixon. I^nch ft Cins — D*t1» ft Bndn*r — John 
R. <}ordoo ft Co. — Leo Beer* — Alva DoBo** ft Co. 

\ 

AaYABVAK ABD JAOEBOBYHU 
<3en*ro ft Geld — Dixie Hamiltoo — Hal ft 
Fnnds — Bhrlner ft Fltxalmmons — Kavanaugh & 
Breretr. • 

MARCUS LOEW CIRCUIT' 
Waek of April 16, 1923 

BZW YORK OITY 
AmailoaB (Flnt Half)— Dooley ft loleen— 
Fletcher ft Fasquale — Cella Weston ft Co.— Uonn 
ft Welaer — Dawaon, Lonlfan ft Corcrt — Paber ft 
McGowan — Senator Mnipby. (Second Half) — 
Hlchon Bn*. — LaBocn ft Dnpreece — Bmily Darrtil 
—Stan Record- Beidle Knemer-^ordan Baitoo 
ft Co. — Lehr ft Kennedy. 

Otphanm (Flnt Half) — ^Toto Elammer ft Co. — . 
Hidden Voice* — C*s*y ft Warren— Alex. Hyde'* 
Orebntn. (Second Halt) — A Day at Coney la- 
land — Toomer ft Day — Towne* ft Fnnklyn — Nor- 
mandl* Girl*. 

Batlonal (Flnt H*lt)— Pedereon Bro*.— Ciray. 
Bnnnon ft -Mnrr — Toomer ft Day — Harrlngtoo ft 

Green— Homer Olrls ft Co. (Second Bait) 

AuatnUan Delioa — Coran ft Tbompeoa— Helm ft 
Lockwood Bister* — y*n ft Vernon. 

Orotley Sqaan (Flnt H*lf)—F*yne*— Scott ft 
Chrrstle— Jack Hallen ft Co.— Harry Ro*e— Dlai 
Monks. (Second Bsif) — Boland ft Knight — Let** 
(}0— Barry & Lancaster- Elcko ft Keyo. 

Delancey Btnet (Pint Half)— AustnlUn Delsos 
— Wyeth ft LaRue— r«Hoen ft Dupnece— Eddie 
Nelson— Fire Kormandle Girl*. (Second H*lt)— 
Dowson. Lanlgan ft Corert- Scott ft cmristle — 
Jack Hallen ft Co.— Amoroa ft Jeanette— Pedetaon 
Bn*. 

Booleratd (Flnt Half)— Delbridge ft Oremmer 
—will. Stanton ft Co. — Geo. Morton— Ishakawa 
Japs. (Second Half) — Three Anrlms— Wyeth ft 
LaRue — Herbert Ashley ft Co.— Phil. Baker- 
Alexander Glrla ft Co. 

Stat* (Flnt Halt)— Berdie Kneoer— Eddie 
Clark ft Co.— Ed. Blondell ft Co.— Towne* ft 
Fnniilyn— Long Tack Sam ft Co. (Second Halt) 
—Jessica Zack ft Co.- Grey ft Byron— McCoy ft 
^^alton— Long Tack Sam ft Co. 

ATenne B (Flnt Holt)— Hidden Voice*— Night 
School- Bert -BaDlon— Unit ft Long. (Second 
Half)— Diaz Monkeya— Chick ft Tiny Harrey— 
Senator Murphy— KaomI ft Bnsillan Xuls. 

LlneolB B«iia» (Flnt Half)- Reck ft Sector 

Al. ft Mnbel Joy— Herbert Ashley ft &>.— Van ft 
Vernon— HIto. BeSow ft Co. (Second Half)- 
Kcrwis, Knyona ft Co.— Cell* Weston ft Co — 
Ed. Blondell & Co.— Eddie Nelson— Monn ft Wei- 
ser. 

yictorU (Flnt Half)— TUre* Anrlma-Flo ft 
Ollle Walton— Grey ft Hyron— rbll. Baker — Alex- 
ander Girls ft Co. (Second Half)— Reck ft Rec- 
tor^Pbll. Darla— Will. Stanton ft Co.— .<!o«aman 
ft Sloaoe — Homer Glrla ft Co. 

BROORLYB, B. Y. 

Palaoo (Flnt Half)- Freer. Baggott ft Prear^ 
Ifelo ft Lockwood Slalen — Naomi ft Bnzlllan 
Nut*. (Second Hnlf)— Fletcher ft P*sqa*le— Tlie 
Night School— Bert Ilanlon— Lew ft (3ene Archer. 

Metropolitan (Firvt Half) — Wyoming Duo — Jor- 
dan Saxton ft Co.— Moe* ft Frye — DInue ft Bel- 
mont Bevue. (Second Half) — Iah*k*wa Japs — 
Marcelle Pallet ft Co.— Faber ft McGowan— Mo«a 
ft Frye. 

Gate* (Flr«t Half)— A D*y at Coney laland— 
Phil. Davla — loeepb E. Bernard ft Co. — Amon* 
ft Jeanette- I.et's Go. (Second Half)- Duponla 
—Flo ft Ollle Wallera — Casey ft Warren— Alex 
Hyde's Orchestra. 

Pulton (Flnt Half)— Rerwla Knyoiia ft Co.— 
Eddie ft Grace — Old Timer* — Soasman ft Sloane — 
Elcko ft Keyo. (Second Half)— Knn- Illilden 
voices — Joseph E. Bernard ft Co. — Ceo. Morton. 

Astoria (First Hsir)—Kara— Marcelle Fallot ft 
fo.— Fred. C. Ilassn ft Co— I.elir ft Kennedy- 
Emily Dsrrcll— Hinra Rrmid. (Second Half) 

Hashl ft OssI— Drilirlricp nrrtnmer— Harry Rose 
— Mason ft Cole Jlcvue. 



WeDer** FRENCH 

FOOTWEAR 

SaSMitbDOnssi. Ik Nevssl Pails 
VertsMla Sfriag-Tfaa ■ajala 



MORPHINE 



nuamu stNiMauM. 



HARRY WELLER 
793 8lhAv."«"«* 





Yon never saw the meiclIeM 
lighting of the stage mar her per- 
■onality— nor detract from the 
charm of her lace. Carefbl make- 
ap eheltera her beaaty. Be rare 
yonraadlenceaeea yoa at your 
best. Use L.aiebnar'm Make-Up. 
Thecreein^pelnta,powdei».and 
Unera meet every demand— play 
every part. QaaUi^ — that*a 
Lelchoer'a, Be rare to use It, 



At yoar innat or lappfy lnBio—. 

TOuerpuMMTfo/iaamimEanueAi MAKEUP 

Soh BtttiOalarm.- OBO. BOR0FBLI>T ft CO, IMh ■t.aod IrrlBC Fl, Nair Teik . 



OPEN EVENINGS 



Warwick (Flnt Half)— Botin ft Bohn— Font ft 
Morrlaoo- Diamond Cut Diamond— Cbick ft Tiny 
Birrty- Pied. LaRelne ft Co. (Second Haiti- 
Blue Bird. Rene — Mario Diow ft Partnen. 

B08IOV, MASS. 
Orphanm- Fold ft Price— Howord ft Boss— 
Skelly ft Helt Rene— Fisher ft Sheppsrd-^. 
Bo«*mond Johnson ft Co. 

BUFFALO, V, T, 
Btato— Nestor ft Vincent— Herman Benena— 
Dobb*. Clark ft Dare— Manton ft Hanley— Joale 
Flynn'a Minstrels. 

HOBOZBr, B. J. 
losw's (Flnt Halt) — ^Th* Dnponta — Covin ft 
TiMmpson— Reed ft Solman — Fox ft Bora*— Lou 
ft Je*n Archer. (Second Halt)— Line ft Long- 
Sully ft Kennedy — Dancing Sboea. ■ 

MOBTBZAX, OAB, 
Loair'a— Alvarea Dno— Jean Boydell— Maiey & 
Singer— Mr. ft Mn. N. PtUUips— CUrk ft O'Neill 
— Dnnco Dreams. 

BZWARS, B. J, 
Btato— Monroe ft Grant— Conny ft Hoirard— 
Block ft O'Donnell— Frank Fky ft Co.— Erelvn 
Phillips ft Co. 

OTTAWA, OAB. 
I.****— Maurice ft GIrlle— May McKay ft SUten 
T";"'. M.'^" * Renn— Adler ft Donhar^Banhan 

Grohs ft Co. 

PBOVISBroE, B, I. 
Emory (Flnt Half)— McOljnn ft Sally— Laurie 
Co.---Jack Powell Sextette. (Sccood 
Rait)- Reo ft Heloar— Fold ft Ooodrteb— Louise 
CarUr ft Co.— Fnnk Gaby. 

SPRIHOFtEU), MASS. 
Bntdvar (Pint BaU)— Reo ft Helmar— Ford 
& Goodrich— Fnnk Gaby. (Second Half)— Mc- 

pJJr'Si sLt^t'if-^""" * ""-"'^ 

TOBOBXO, OAB. 
Yong* Stnet— Preroet ft Goelet— Stevens ft 
Vl'ugn^ * young— Jarrow-Ureenwich 

CHICAGO KEITH OFHCE 
Waek of April 15. 1923 
CnrOIBBATI, OHIO 
Paiaco— Nippon Dno— Mildred Manley— Ward 
Baker Co.— Baraum Was Bight— J. Thnmpsoit— 
Harry Bewley Co. 

OI£VELABS, OSaO 
Hlppodnma— Herb. Lloyd Co.— Mahoney ft Cecil 
—Stanley ft Wilson*— Uorgin ft Gate*— Elass 
Manning ft Klass. 

ORAWFOROBVILIiE, IBS. 
..Stnnd (Second Hair)- loex Hanley— Taylor ft 

Bobbe— Gene ft MIgnon. ' 

DAYTOB, Omo 
Zelth'a (Flnt Half)— la Palartca 3— l>blna ft 
Co.— Four Tamakls. (Second Half)- D*lntT Marie 
—Christy ft Bennett — Merle Tallman Co. 

DETROIT. MIOH. 
La Salle Oardan (First Half)— Rose O'Hara— 
Green ft Burnett — All ft Kent— Sunshine Kiddlea. 
(Second Half) — Rdwards ft Lomond — Lynn A 
Lockwood— Phlna ft C!o. ' « 

E7ABsmxE, nrs, 
victory— Taylor ft Bobbe— Inei Hanley. 

FT. WAYBR. ZBD. 
Palace (Flnt Half) — Edwanla ft Lamond— Black 
ft O'Donnell— Uarle Tallman CO. (Second Half) 
— Urren ft Baraett — Four Emtaa, 

HUVTIBOTOB, IHD. 
Hnntincton— Allen ft Kent. 

IBSIABAPOUB, IBS, 
Palace — Baggott ft Sheldon — Maifleld ft Golton 
—Songs ft Scenes — Cunningham-Bennett Co. — Mills 
& Doncan — Lucy Bmcb. 

KOXOMO, IBD. 
Bband (Flnt Half)— The Nelaon*— Inez Hanley 
— Qulnn ft Caverly— Royal Ventlan Five. (Second 
Half)- Toyland— Pair of Deuce*. 



IRZDiaTOB, XT. 
Baa AU (FIrat HilO— I. ft Bury ShlaUa— 
Shannon ft Goidoo — Dainty Marie — Har^ Ollbofft 
-^Roa*. Wy** ft W. (Second H*lt)— Bay** ft 
Speck — BylTe*ter ft Yiae*. 

uxA. omo 

Fannt Opsim Baas* (Second Halt)— Tbie* Mad- 
caps — Black ft O'Donnell — Bo** O'Bon — ^TUfO 

Shoe*. 

MTDWT.MDWB, OBIO 
(}eid«B— La Palarlc* Three— Mahal Haipei Co. 
Loinsvnxz; my, 

Kaith'a (Pint HaU)— Ttan* Madcaps— OhrlMy 
ft Buuutt — BUck Eyed Bn**na. (Second Half) — 
Foot Volnntecn — Ro**, Wyae ft Wyaer. 
PASVOAE, XY, 

Oxphonm (Pint H*U) — Poor Volnatocra — SylT**- 
ter ft Tance. (Second Hnit) — Black Byed Bnaana 
— Btbel Parker ft Boya. 



Mnmr .(Pint Half)— Girl From Teylaad— Al 
Fielda Co. — Oena ft Mlgnon. (Secoad Half)— 
Haunted Violin— Hart, Wagner ft Eltl*. 

TERRS KAUTE, IBD, 

Liberty (Flnt Half)— Haunted TlollD— Nairpoct, 
SUrk ft P. (Second H*lf)— Beilclalre ft Fnaete. 



WESTERN VAUDEVILLE 
Wedi of April IS, 1923 

CHIaAOO, ILL. 
Majestic — The Earls — Oaffney ft Walton — Bird 
Cabant — Armatrong ft Phelpa — Born* Resplaa- 
dent— L*« Gellls— Lambert ft Pish — Glrton Girl*. 
IComtimutd om pott 29) 



JUST OUT 

M cNALLVS Ma q 
BULLETIN Il0.0 

Prica, One Dollar Per Copy 



Ofaatlc eoDodta 140 
and orlilnal TnMDa i 




lll-m Mi* hs nay n^im. 
Hdtani'a Bollalhi Na 8 la I „ 
bettirla qiallly than mtt btfa*. 
■otn* aa alvaia, ens dstlar par r — 
MUUrt WtUTII BaL ieei 

2i'°ScSubR'« '^MtUcSS ~ 



12 ItUIIB ACTS for tmm 

applaia* vlnntr 
U •IIBIBAl ACTS r« as] 

Bsk* fDod en any wn 
39 svirniE rutDiE* <B an e( 

Iala« una hits. 



MEAT VEBTUlMSItT ACT 
■itltlad Otm Onaf"— Ifa • iM. 

■BiF-UFTiie nmux ierr m* «i is » td 

kaiat. an-ft( 
UTTLIIS QDAITETTI ACT. It* Oct lUa 

with tenor at t]» itb-tkUlas s*«^ 
4 CMUCTEi CBBEOT UETU. A «nsa 

start to flnlih. 
9 CRAUCTEI IDIinaiC eaillM *«l P^a.- 

ira brubt. tren and bdMea tmt «tth «tL 
12 BIISTiEL FIIST-Mm «tth slia siIIIIIm 



jckm and uu m Bi s ngL 

61M0 ■IISTIEL FIMU asttUii 

Bflnt." IbD <tf '""ffc- 
■(BDIEM <r OMi-eis Jaka far ads-osU as- 

wrsaJon fer 1v* naka and aal* *ad flmsla. 
■EMDO ous eoae« mkilal afekfe k MM 
to the niMll* DBfi 
liiiiiatsi the prtea i 

■a 8 la only ens dsIL _ 

io* BSUETin Baa. 7 aag 0 IV «u». wflh 



81 



sc Bauurt ulum 



WM. McNALLY 
E. 12Sth St^ New York 



28 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 11, 1923 



BIG BOOKINGS FOR SUMMER 

The Ray Miller,. Inc., officers report that 
tiie booldiigs for die mmmg monlh and 
all throngh the sumiiier are heavier than i 
they expected. For the month of April 
the offices will supply orchestras for 
twenty-five dances. 

At Ray Miller's Faiadise Dance Hall, in 
Newark, business has improved steadily. 
Miller has adopted a novel departure for a 
place of this kind. From 8 until 10 p. m. 
he stands at die entrance downstairs and 
greets the couples as thev come in, calling . 
them fay name if possible. From ten on 
he directs the orchestra. He also has in- 
augurated several novelties, miming a 
"Home" night last Tuesday in conjimcdon 
with the son^ "Home," which was written 
by Billy Fazioli, his pianist, and Ray Kla- 
ges, also connected with Paradise. 

In line with Miller's intention to open 
a chain of dance halls he has leased the 
dance hall at Pleasure Seekers' Beach, 
Bridgeport, Conn., for the summer. The 
dance hall is one of the largest in that part 
of the country, being 184 feet wide by 318 
feet long, capable of accommodating six 
thousand people. Two orchestras will be 
used, a twelve-piece combination under die 
Itaderihip of Mike Spedale and a five-piece 
jazz band. Miller will open the hall on 
May 16. 



ORCHESTRA NEWS 



HAVANOS IN NOVEL ACT 

Lt. Ferdinandos' Havana Orchestra 
opened last week in Newark, at Proctor's 
Theatre, presenting one of the most novel 
acts ever' seen on the vaudeville stage. The 
men were costumed in Tuxedo with red 
sashes about their waists, the stage set- 
ting depicting the veranda of the Hotel 
Seville, Havana,- with the harbor and Moro 
Casde in the background. The lighting 
effects are subdued and in keeping with 
the act, the whole being admirably staged. 
Leo J. LaBlanc staged the effect 

Lt. Ferdinacdos has a novel combination 
of sixteen musicians, known both in this 
L ouuliy and in Cuba, having played at the 
exclusive Hotel Seville in the latter coun- 
tiT for several months. The act will shorUy 
be seen in and around New York. 



OI VITO BAND IN NEW YORK 

Di Vito's Orchestra, a nine-piece com- 
bination under the leadership of Michael 
S. Di Vito was in New York last wedc to 
arrange for sunnner work. They recentiy 
completed an all winter dance tour of one- 
ni^ters through New Fngland, and played 
the last half, the week before last, at the 
Jefferson Theatre here, workingwith Ste- 
vers and Lovejoy- James W. oremian is 
die business manager for the band which 
is one of the best combinations in New 
England. 



GOLKN AT HABOLTON 

Ernie Golden returned to the Hamilton 
this week at the request of the manage- 
ment and patrons, jMaying an entire week 
although this is ouy a split-wedc house. 
Golden received spectacular bUling and 
was made a big feature attraction. In his 
act this week he baa replaced his original 
composition, "Chinese Charlie" a number 
m vdiich he uses a novel scene depicting 
n^t life in the Chinese section of an 
American city. • 



LUBI TO PLAY ON BERKSHIRE 

Joseph Labi, directing an orchestra of 
twelve men, has been engaged to furnish 
the dance music on the S. S. Berkshire, 
of the Hudson Navigation Company. 
There are three other ships oo the line 
but diese use three or four piece com- 
binations. The ships are already running 
but the orchestras do not start on board 
imtil late in May. 




BENNETT BACK FROM ENGLAND 

Robert Bennett, leader of the TrcMXo- 
raggers, a Paul Specfat organization, and 
the other seven members of this orchestra, 
returned from England on the Olympic 
last Thursday after a long engagement at 
the Trocadero Restaurant in London. 
Bennett reports that English musicians 
are twenty-five years behind the times in 
the field of dance music and lok upon 
the American invasion with consternation, 
for they see no way of schooling, them- 
selves to compete. 

As Bennett sees die situation, the Eng- 
lishman's inability to conform to present 
day dance standards is due almost en- 
tirely to the latent English love of the 
established order of things. England is 
far (from a progressive country and what 
was good enough for his- father, and 
father^ father bnore him is good enough 
with him. This does not hold true of the 
younger, dancing generation, who desire 
to dance to American tunes played the 
American way, the result being an impasse 
between the British public and the British 
musicians. 



LEVIATHAN ORCHESTRA OPENS 

The S. S. Leviathan Orchestra, Nelson 
Maples director, and presented by Paul 
Whiteman, Inc., opened Monday at the Al- 
hambra Theatre and scored a great hit 
Fourteen men are used in the act, many 
of them doubling on several instruments. 
Besides these, five members of the orches- 
tra sing, four of them doing quartette work 
and one of them, Morton Downey, singing 
several tenor solos. Keith Pittman, doub- 
ling on several bass instruments, clowns 
with the quartette, adding a few laughs to 
the act The act is reviewed dsewhere as 
a new act. The act will appear at the 
Royal Theatre next week. 



FRYE FOR ATLANTIC CITY 

Charles Frye, the Philadelphia Or- 
chestra Leader, was in New York last 
week making arrangements for his sum- 
mer season. Frye will return to the Mil- 
lion Dollar Pier, Atlantic Oty, on June 
16, and will remam there for the rest of the 
snminer, until after the Adantic City Car- 
nival. Frye has also booked a Benson or- 
diestia to opea at the same time, so that 
the personnel at the pier during the coming 
summer will be practically the same as last 
year. 

RUSSELL MORGAN MARRIES 

Russell Morgan, trombonist with Paul 
Specht's Orchestra, was married last week 
to Miss Elva Irving, formerly of Phila- 
delidiia, at the home of the bride in that 
dty. Morgan's home b in Wilkes-Barre, 
Pa. 

Harold Saliers, banjoist with the same 
orchestra, received word last week 'from 
his wife, in Tiffin, Ohio, that she had pre- 
sented Mm with a six pound baby girl. 



AKST AT SIXTY CLUB 

Hany Akst's Orchestra is appearing 
every Saturday niglit at John Rumsey's 
Sixty Qub. The personnel of the orches- 
tra is as follows: Harry Alcst piano; 
Benny Knieger, saxophone; Gene Fosdick, 
saxophone; Eddie Davis, violin; Jerry 
Friedman, Violin; Alex Drasein, violin; 
Frank Capie, banjo ; Eddie Salvatore, bass ; 
and Harry Rosenbog, drums. 

MELODY BOYS SIGN 

The California Melody Boys, under the 
leadership of George Browne, have been 
engaged to appear at the Nightingale, 48th 
street and Broadway. This is a six-piece 
combination that has been fumidiing the 
music'at the Ambassador in Greenpoint 



FRANKLIN IN ATLANTIC CITY 

Joseph B. Franklin left for a three 
day trip to Atlantic City last week to 
complete negotiations whidb he had pend- 
ing to place several orchestras in cafes, 
hotels and cabarets there. 



WADSWORTH SAILS SATURDAY 4 

Wheeler Wadsworth and his orchestra 
will Sail Saturday, April 14 on the S. S. 
George Washington, being the first White- 
man orchestra to sail on the Shipping 
Board boats. On the same day a smaller 
combination under the direction of J^ 
Lehman, will sail on the S. S. Western 
World of the Munson line. 

Ernest Cutting, of the Whiteman offices, 
sailed from England on the S. S; Presi- 
dent Roosevelt, April S and will arrive in 
this country the latter part of this week, 

Louis Pizzo. directing Paul Whiteman's 
Havana Orchestra is playing at the 
Pavilion Royal on Saturdays and Sun- 
days. 

ORCHESTRAS AT N. V. A. BALL 

Following the show at the N. V. .A. ball 
last Friday evening three vaudeville or- 
chestras played for the dancings these 
being Harry Stoddard, Ernie Golden and 
Harold Stem. All three alternated, the 
music being continuous. In spite of the 
immense size of the ZZnd Regiment Ar- 
mory where the Washington Heights 
Ball was held, none of the orchestras had 
any difficulty in making themselves aud- 
ible, although -the largest was of ten 
pieces only. 

MIELE FOR VAUDEVILLE 

_ Jack Miele, and his orchestra, now put- 
ting in their sixth month at the Ritz of 
Harlem will open in vaudeville soon, play- 
ing with an act and keeping on with their 
work at the cabaret Bob Schaeffcr, the 
song writer, is interested in the ordiestra, 
and sings several numbers each night 
while the orchestra plays his accompani- 
ment. 



PARAMOUNT AT ROOF GARDEN 

I 

The New York Paramount Orchestra 
is now placing at the Italian Roof Gar- 
den, Criterion Restaurant, in London, and 
has become one of the established Amer- 
ican orchestras in England. Christopher 
Bishop, the leader of die combination and 
also business manager for several of his 
combinations playing dance engagements, 
was widely quoted in English papers on 
the American style of dance ;nusic at the 
time prior to Paul Whiteman's arrival. 



PARAMOUNT PLAYERS ENGAGED 

The Seven Palais Paramount Players 
opened in Pleasure Park, Evansville, In- 
diana last week. The orchestra is under 
the direction of Harold Troy and is one 
of the best combinations of musicians in 
the west 

They are engaged for the entire season 
at Danceland, after having played all win- 
ter oo the Keith circuit 



DONNOLLY PLAYS ALDA'S PART 

While dosing a window in her dressing 
room at Moss' Coliseum theatre last wedc, 
De Lyle Alda smashed her finger and in- 
jured it to such an extent that she fainted, 
and after regaining consdousness, had to 
be taken home. As it was too late to get 
an act to fill, an announcement about the 
accident was made before the act went on; 
to the audience, and that in order to give 
them an idea of what the act was all about 
James Donnolly, of Tiemy and DonnoUy, 
would play botli his own and Miss Alda's 
parts. iDonnoUy did this so successfnlly 
playing both roles in tuxedo, jumping from 
one part of the stage to another in order 
to read Miss Alda's lines properly, that the 
act was a sensation. The remarlable part 
of DonnoUy's stunt is the fact that he had 
never read the lines before. 

During the afternoon, one of the dancers 
in the same act had sprained his ankle, and 
Frank Ellis, of Walsh and Ellis, vrtio were 
on the bill, jumped into the role on two 
minutes' notice, and read the lines and did 
a specialty dance. Miss Alda and the boy 
recovered sufficienUy to return to work the 
next day. 

Jli.^j 

KEMMLER IN PITTSBURGH 

Kemmler's Orchestra is rising to prom- 
inence in the dance field in Pittsburgh and 
have become one of the best known or- 
diestras in that dty. Kemmler has been 
identified with dance orchestras for the 
past fifteen years both as leader and vio- 
linist. At the i»rcsent time nesotiations 
are pending with several of the larger talk- 
ing machine companies for this orchestra 
to make records. In the combination, be- 
sides Mr. Kemmler, are James H. rro- 
phater, inano; George O'Neil, trumpet; 
and Samuel McCaughey, drums and xylo- 
phone. 

FULL WEEKS FOR ORCHESTRAS 

Vincent Lopez and his Pennsylvania 
Orchestra will play a full week at B. S. 
Moss' Coliseum Theatre, beginning 
April 16. This will be the first time 
any act has played a full week in that 
house. 

Ernie Golden is playing a full week 
at Keith's Hamilton this week, in con- 
junction with "All-Nationality Week." 
Golden changes his programme of num- 
bers every day, to suit the nationality 
being celebrated. 

ROGERS AND DONNELLY CLOSING 

Rogers and Donnelly will close a long 
vaudeville season the last of this month. 
Ralph Rogers of the team, who is an 
Italian eccentric comedian, has the credit 
of being one of the first Italian comedians 
to findy dress the character. He first ap- 
peared in an English walking suit about 
six years ago. 



LANIN FOR THIRD YEAR 

Contrary to published reports Sam Lanin 
will not close at Roseland this Summer. 
Although Lanin himself will not play at 
Roseland one of his smaller ordiestras 
will not close at Roseland this Summer. 
Plans for the Fall season have not yet beep 
completed but it is probable that Lanin 
and his orchestra will play at Roseland 
for their third successive year. 



SELVIN CLOSING 

Benny Selvin and his orchestra, after 
having played at the Boardwalk, one of 
the Selvin chain of restaurants, for six 
months, will dose there the end of this 
month. Selvin has been working for the 
Sdvin interests without a halt for the 
past few years, using combinations of 
various sizes. He has not yet announced 
his future plans. 

SULLIVAN WITH "KELLY" SHOW 

George Sullivan, directing a five piece 
combination, is furnishing inddental music 
for "Litde Ndlie Kelly* die George M. 
Cohan show now playing at the Liberty 
Theatre. Arthur Hayes is the featured 
member of the organisition. 



SUES THURS.— DIVORCED SAT. 

Chicago. April 7. — The divorce mill 
does not always grind slowly. Gussie Bier 
obtained a divorce from Harry W. Fisher 
in Chicago in brief time the last week in 
March. Her suit was filed on Thursday 
and her divorce granted the following 
Saturday. Leon A. Berezniak was the 
attorney. 



RIESENFELD AT PALACE 

Hugo Riesenfeld and his orchestra 
opened at the Palace Theatre Monday for 
a week's engagement, Reisenfeld giving 

? Tactically the same repertoire of "XHassical 
azz" that he presented and inaugurated at 
the Rialto Theatre. 



REED BACK FROM PANAMA 

Doc Reed and his White Way Orchestra 
have just returned from a six month's en- 
gagement at Giro's Cafe, Panama, where 
they had been booked by Frank Silvers. 
They will open shortly in Atlantic Gty. 



HALLETT ORCHESTRA IN ACT 

Mai Hallett, through his office, has 
placed a six-piece combination tinder the 
direction of Carl Berger to open with 
Gretchen Eastman in vaudeville within the 
next two wedcs. 



April 11, 1923 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



29 



RALPH 



ROGERS 



AND 



DONNELLY 



Completing a Most Pleasimt and Succeuful Vaudeville Season on the B. F. Keith Circuit. Thaiilu to Our Personal Representa- 

tives, MORRIS AND FEIL 



mmzAPOus, xm. 

BaTUtli BiTMt — I>*Te & TkuI*— nitlBia— Buiy 
HoBman A Co. — Blidi ot PandlM— Oltat Uitar— 
McOoods, L«iucn & Co. — Brnftr A Goodwin. 



VAUDEVILLE BILLS 

iCentiniud from pagt 27) 



Scdila (Flnt Bain— A Fair of Dtocw— Ktoo. 
Kern * IfelroM — WUilamt & Claik — La Oraeloaa. 
(Socosd Half) — lAwtoB — AnuboUa — Bender * 
Amutrong — Rcddlofton & Grant. 

Amedcan (Fliat Halt) — Bamett & Lnnaid. 

Xineola (Pint Half) — Beddlngton & Orut— 
Oladra Delmar * Band. (Second Halt)— OUt* * 
Hack. 

Snstowaod (Firat Halt)— (%nUer * Baae— Par- 
orltaa ot tbe Past — Matraret Toanf. (Second 
Halt) — Hngh Jobnaton — ^Maigaiet Ycmt CeTene 
Tkoope — Earl * Rial Beroe. 

Oipkenm (April 21 and 22)— Mack tt Salle— 
RIehjiidwHi Broa. & Cberry — Trenell Trio. 

BLOonnroToir, ill. 
Majeatlo (Flnt Half)— WUbnr * Adama— Pilm- 
nae Four — Tbe Oolden Bird. (Second Halt) — 
WUaoo-Anbrer Trio— Will J. Ward— FiTorttce ot 
tbe Paat. 

BOOHE, IOWA 
Xyrlo — Fagg & Wblte. 

oKAioAiov, nx. 

Jack Hugbea Doo — Hemmond'a Wblteway Or- 
'Cbeetra- Frank Deroe & Co.— CoUlna A Hart — 
WUIIe Higgle. 

DATEBFOBT, IOWA 
BmrDs Cama * Co. — Tbree Weber Olrla. 

smraxTB, iowa 

'KaJeatlD — Natalie Harrlaon A Co. — Goman Bna. 

FAXOO, H. S. 
Grand (Flnt Halt)— Mack & SaUe— Blcbaidaon 
Bra. & Cberrr — ^Trenell Trio. (Secood Halt) — 
Tlie Bkatella — Boae ft Tbom — Stoart Glrla— Toa. 
cano Broa. 

rr. XASIBOH, IOWA 
OelsmUft— Hanr Garland— Ollre & Mack— niK« 
Weber Olrla. 

n aT.nim iiiii TT.T. 

Oiphaam (Flnt Half)— Cbrlatle * Bennett- 
- Foot Bnblnl Slaten. (Second Halt) — Barmood 
WUbert— Ctumberliin & Karle— San Flteb Utn- 

atrrla. 

GRASS ISLABS, VZB. 
lUJeetio (Bonder)— Ulller, Packer * Bel>— 
Bat>bT Brawater & Co. (April 19, 20 and 21)— 
Bndr ft Maboner — Sylrla Dsyne ft Co. 

0B2EH BAT, WIB. 
Oiphenm — Jerome ft Fnnce — George ft Fnol 
Hickman — Tbree Melvln Brotben. 

joLiET, nx. 

Orpkaam (First Halt)— Lawton— Dealer Slaten 
.ft Co. (Second Halt)— Jack Boabler ft MoSa— 
Boecoe Alia — Kate Fallman ft Co. 

fopuir, xo. 

EleoMo (Flnt Halt)— Earr ft Barr— Moore ft 
Vlelda. (Second Halt)^oe Allen— Bndeilck 
Wrnn A Co. 

iTAWBan OITT, KAK. 
EleoMo (Flnt Halt) — Paol Babn ft Cc—Ttnt 
Alex. (Second Half)— Foeb Fonr. 

iraunaa oiTT, MO. 
Globe (Flnt Half)— Arcb Woodr— Starllnc ft 
•Gold — Broadwar to tbe Boverr- (Second Etolt) — 
MaaoQ ft Scboll — Lerere ft ColUna— Bobbr firewa- 
ter ft 0».— Trier ft Crollna. 

LA GBOBBE, WIS. 
BlToli (Sondar. Moodar and Tneadar) — ^Tbe 
:SkateUa — Boee ft Tbom— Stnart Glrla — Toacano . 

Broa. 

IXAVZHWOSTB. XAV. 

OrpkenD — Maaon ft SchoU- Lerere ft CoUlna — 
Tocb Foot— I>ler ft CroUne— Wlkl Bird ft Co, 

XCTOOLV. HEBB. 
Ubertr (Flnt Halt)— MlUer Packer ft Sels— 
'Sobbr Brewiter ft 0>. — Silver DuTal ft Klrtr — 
.Jim. (Second Halt)— Hackett ft Beach. 

XASIBOH, WS. 
Oiphenm (Flnt Halt) — Jack ft Jeaale Olbaon — 
liar ft Bdnn Tt*ej — Vanltr Qoartette — Nlobe — 
•Mlnateel Monarclw — Stella Marbew. (Second 
Halt) — ^Tbe Floreols — Volano Gamble — Flicslde 
'Bererlee— Spencer ft Wllllama — Dancing Kcnnedja. 

XABSRAIITOWV, IOWA 
Caalno— Lobln ft Lewla. 

KILWAVKEE, WIS. 
Xajeitlo— Zelda Broa. — Erana, Uero & Brana— 
Jobnnr'a New Car— BlUy Miller ft Co. — Leona Ball 
Berne— Frank Farron— Ijdj Allce'a PeU. 



HOBTOIZ, 

AndltarloB (Snndar)— Sllrer DnTal ft Kltbr. 
(April 20 and 21)— Carre ft Uoio— Hack ft Yelmar. 

FEOBIA, nX. 
Orpheam (Flnt Halt)— DaUaa Walker — Boaeoe 
AUa, Kate Pnllman ft Co.— Wllaon-Aadnr Ttto. 
(Second Half)— MIddleton * Spellaarar— Prlm- 
roae Fonr. 

. auiHOT. nx. 

Oiphemn (Flnt Halt)— Barmond Wllbett— 
CliamberUIn ft Earle— Dan Flteb Xlnatnla. (See- 
'ond Halt)— Cbrlatle ft Bennett— Foor BnMnl Sla- 

t«a. 

BACIHE, WIB. 
Blalts— Pranc« ft Juome— Frank ft Btbel Hnlli 
— Coolter ft Wnee Ta Gradoaa. 

BOOKFOBB, lU^ 
Falac* (Flnt E(aU)— Tbe Flotenla — ^Toland Gam- 
ble— FIrealde Bereiln— StKncer ft WUlUma — 
Dancing Kennedra. (Second Bait) — Jack ft Jeaale 
Glbaon — Bar ft Bdna Tncr — Stella Marbaw — 
Mlnatrel Uonaicba— Nlobe. 

sr JOE, xo. 

EleeMo (Flnt Halt)— Franda Bona ft DnBoaa— 
Monte ft I^ona— Crratal Bennett ft Co. (Second 
Halt)— Sinclair ft Gnr— Areb Woodr — MUler, 
Packer ft Beta. 

BT. LOUIS. XO. 

OoiombU (Flnt Halt)- Wbeaton ft Bord— Frank 
ft Etbel Bella— Sermoor ft Jeanette. (Beccnd 
Halt)— Lntar Barmond ft Co.— WMtlng ft Dnnn— 
McKlnler Blater»— Barrr Garland. 

Blalts (Flnt Half)— Ward ft Beotar— Jack 
Hngbea Dno— Oerene Tnnpe— Ned Neator ft Co. 
(Second Half)— Bodero ft Brown— WllUama * 
Clark — Foor Tamakla. 

Grand Opata Bona* — Once Ayen ft Bro. — flun- 
ler. Tripp ft Mowatt — Bob Untpbj — Weir ft 
Crest — Barmond Bond ft Co. — Stanler Chapman — 
Henrr Catalano ft Co. — Alexandria — Page, Hack ft 
Mack. 

Eovz oirr, iowa 

Oxphenm — (Flnt Bait) — Lore SUtero— Uarrr Ue 
—suit CoUlna. (Second Bait)— Big Jim— Fnnk 
Whitman — Benee Boberta ft Band — Fierce ft Bran. 

sotyrR jUEjis. ivs* 
Falasa (Flnt Halt)- Fettr Beat ft Bro.— Tango 
Sboea — Emma Cans ft Co. (Second Bait)— John 
ft Nellie Olma— Walla ft WlnUmp— SchwarU ft 
Clifford. 

Xajaatlo (Flnt Halt)— Jolrn ft NeUle Olma— 
Stan ot Tean Ago— Bodero ft Brown— Will J. 
Werd — CoUlna ft Biart. (Second Halt)— Chandon 
Trio — Ward ft Dooler — Aotomn Trio — Jarrla Bema 
—Ned Neator ft Co. 

BPsnron£iJ>, xo. 

Elaotrio (Flnt Halt)— Joe Allen— Broderick 
Wrnn ft Co. (Second Belt) — Earr ft Barr — Mooi« 

ft Flelda. 

TEBBX HAtlTE; IBB, 

HIppodnma — Antnmn Trio— Hammond'a White- 
war Orcbeatim — Scbwarta ft Clifford — Chan don Trio 
— WUIIe Higgle. 

TOFESA, KABB. 

Voraltr (First Halt)- Maaoo ft BchoD— LaTCte 
ft o>lllna— Fteh Fooi^-Tyier ft CroUoa. (Second 
Half)— Panl Bahn ft Co.— SUrer, DnTal ft Klitr 
— Monte ft Ljona. 



"CAPTAIN AND KIDS" AGAIN 

Gus Hill and George M. Gatts have 
made arrangements whereby the Walfred 
Amusement Company will send on tour 
the cartoon comedy, "The Captain and the 
Kids" again next season. This attraction 
which has always been produced in the 
past by Hill alone was not on tour the 
past season. 



<<FOLLIES" GIRLS RETURNS 

Phoebe Lee and Helen Worthing, the 
two "Ziegfeld Follies" girls who took Palm 
Beach by storm when they went there on 
their winter vacation, returned to the cast 
of the show at the New Amsterdam Thea- 
tre. 



Jaclc \A/alsh & 



"AS YOU LIKE IT" CAST 

The full cast for the American National 
Theatre's production of "As Yon Like It," 
which opens at the Poli Theatre, Wash- 
ington, next Monday, prior to coming to 
the Shubert Theatre on April 23, was 
made last wedc The cast as to characters 
is: The Duke, J. Malcom Duim; Duke 
Frederick, John Craig; Amiens, Fraidc 
Aroundel; Jacques, A. E. Anson; Le 
Beau, Edgar Norton; Oliver, Jerome 
Lawler; Jacques de Bois, Walter Abel; 
Orlando, Ian Keith; Adam, Arnold Lucy; 
William, Perdval Vivian; Touchstone, 
Ernest Lanrford ; Silvius, William Wil- 
liams; Coria, John S. O'Brien; Rosalind, 
Marjorie Rajaj>eau; Celia, Margalo Gill- 
more; Phoebe, Gwyneed Vernon; Audrey, 
Hortense Alden. Perdval Vivian is the 
general stage manager and is assisted by 
Earl Redding. The costumes and settings 
for the production are being fumi^ied by 
Lee Simonson, art director of the Theatre 
Guild. 



BUT TWO OF ORIGINAL CAST LEFT 

Only two of the original members of 
the cast of Tride," a comedy drsma 
by Tbomptou Bntuianan, now in re- 
hearsal, which will be prodnced by 
Oliver Morosco, are lefL Hilda Spong, 
who was to have been featured in the 

flay which was formerly called "Mon 
'apa," withdraw last week, lea%-mg only 
Bob Fisher and Juliette Day, as the 
only original selections. Besides them 
in the cast are: William Austin, Dorothy 
Slaytor, Herbert Belmore, Eugene Rea- 
ding, Herman Lieb, Harold Van Rens- 
slair, Camille Dalberg, Fred Martellc, 
Beach Cooke, Kenneth Dana, Mary 
Fisher, Claire Greenwood, and Jsne 
Hope. Morosco intends bringing the 
play into the Morosco Theatre at the 
end of this month, following the four- 
week stay of "The Wasp." 



FORMER ACTRESS SUES. 

Edith Williains Draper, former actress, 
who aroeared m "Apple Blossoms" and 
other Dillingham productions, filed suit 
for divorce last week against her Inuband 
Paul Draper, tenor soloist and grandson 
of the late Charles A. Dana. The papers 
filed in Ae Supreme Court are sealed and 
allegations made ■ by Mrs. Diaper could 
not be learned. 

Miss Williams came here from London 
about six vears ago and marri^ Mr. 
Draper in May, 1920. Paul Draper has . 
appeared as soloist with the Boston and ' 
Philadelphia Symphoiiy Orchestras and is 
noted as a German heder singer. He is 
the son of Dr. William H. Draper. 



EQUnY PRAISES DRESDEN 

The Equitv Deputy Report last week 
contained a laudation of A. L. Erlan^er 
and Alfred E. Aarons, compUmentug 
them in profuse terms for having given 
the comfort of the actor a tfaooriit in 
the constinction of the Dresden Theatre, 
the rejuvenated ZiegfeM Roof. 

The new dressing rooms installed are 
spacious and commodious. They proved 
such a revelation to the members of 
"Gnders" that th^ could not restrain 
themselves from forwarding the good 
news to their organization, who promptly 
dispatched a letter of appreciation to 
Messrs. Erlanger and Aarons rtunlrmg 
them for their interest in the comfort 
of tiie players. 



NEW TITLE FOR INCE FILM 

The title of the drug picture based on 
the life of Wallace Reed which Thomas 
H. Ince will pr<xluce will not be "The 
Living Dead." Arthur C Aiston recently 
notified Ince that he had a play by Louise 
Curtis Brown of that title which was copy- 
righted on November 8; 1917. Ince replied 
to Aiston that he knew nothing of the play, 
but having beoi advised, would change the 
title of tine picture "The Aistoq play is 
not based on the drug evil, hut is a melo- 
drama which he will produce next seasoiL 



WhU N. y. CUfPtr Svn: Jack Walak 
In n tnhUd (otuical eonedr, "liltia Hlaa 
lata WnUam Dnoler, and geta orcr hia onnadr 



OoonaBr a ut asotfacT 
ttoe." Wal ah U a aort o( 
staff vltli ^inch wul pcpk 



mat •( «• HQ 



TOM POWERS FOR STOCK 

Tom Powers, who closed his engage- 
ment with "Why Not" at the Equity- 
Forty-Eighth Street Theatre last Satur- 
day night has been en^ged by Stuart 
Walker to' appear with his dramatic stock 
company at the Murat Theatre, Indianap- 
olis for foor weeks beginning May. 7. 
Powers will appear with the stock com- 
pany in "Rolfo's Wild Oats." "Banco" 
and "Why Not." 



FARRAR HEARING POSTPONED 

Justice O'Malley in the Supreme Coort 
has ordered a stay of all proceedings in 
the divorce suit of Geraldine rarrar against 
Lou Tellegcn iwtil April 20. 

Stella Larrimore, meanwhile will take an 
appeal to the Appellate Division from Jus- 
tice O'Malley's decision refusing a jtny 
trial in order to dear her name, which was 
brought into the divorce proceedings. ICss 
Lammore was identied as a "Miss S. L," 
as one of three corespondents. 

Justice O'Malle/s order autonatkally 
postpones the final hearing before Referee 
Tbomas H. Mdioiiey imtil April 20, or 
until Miss Larrimore s appeal has been ar- 
gued. 

Miss Larrimore appeared in Tellegcn's 
last starring vehide "Don Juan," whidi 
played a short engagement at the Garridc 
Theatre. 



FLORENCE REED FOR STOCK 

Florence Reed who dosed in "Hail and 
Farewell," a play by William Hnrlbnt, 
at the Morosco Theatre on March 24, has 
changed her idana regarding sailing for 
Ettrope shortly and wul araear as a gnest 
star with the Henry Duffy Players for 
three weeks. Miss Reed will appear in 
"Haa and FareweU" at the Academy of 
Music, Baltimore; Pit Theatre, PitU- 
bnrgfa and President Theatre, Wa^iingtoa. 
She will open her engagement in Balti- 
more next Monday. 



WO(M>S TO DO THE NEXT 

AI H. Woods dedares that he and not 
the Selwyns will produce the next editicm 
of "Potash and Pearlmutter" which' will 
be based on the radio subject next season. 
Woods says that he only turned orer the 
"P and P" productioa rights for "Part- 
ners Again" to the Sdwyns but kept fu- 
ture production rights lor himself. He 
expects to make the new production late 
in the Fall with Barney Bernard and 
Alex Carr playing the title roles. 



JARVIS SELLS BOOK RIGHTS 

Sidn^ Jarvis completed a deal last 
week whereby he sold to Joseph Sdiendc 
the motion picture rights to the novd 
"Love and EKana." by Concordia Merrill. 
One of the Talcradge sisters will be 
starred in the film, which will be pro- 
duced in the near future. 



The Sfory fb* Petals Told 

A SMTIEtl UVC B/tUAS. 
TU^Sa ne-iadauiU r a wag far inmgpaala. tnaa 
AlnAhlpa an ^*^"T fvflad and Ufa Ba^tosa cbbs& Raa 
ID l aunul ied Artba. rsHbbtd-br BJIUIIB ITOX- 

Bim ma t m. ui wot isi« s&att. hi* Taik 



30 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 11. 19» 




PALACE, NEW YORK, NOW, WEEK APRIL 9 
BROADWAY DEBUT OF EUROPE'S GREATEST MUSIC HALL ARTIST 

ENRICO MSTELLI 

THE WORLD'S WONDER 

RIVERSIDE, NEXT WEEK, APRIL 16 

Direcdon— H. B. MARINELLI The World's Theatrical Exchange, 24S West 47th Street, New York 




DEATHS 



- Ed. & Wmntr, ffoicra] Mgent and tnffic 
manager of the ScIIb-FIoio Circus died aaddcnly 
at the Palmer Honsc, Chicago, oxly Tuesday 
monunff, April 3rd* mm stommch troablc. 

Mr Wanier waa bora in Rochater, N. Y., forty 
-fivs jan aso and was the Gneral Agent of the 
Noma and Kowe Circus, havios been appointed 
to that position when qnite a vouDg man and 
after jnlotmg thia •how aocceaiioUy for several 
years, he went to the SeHs-Floto Circus as special 
•rrprcsBitati-vc ahead for B. H. Tameon one of 
'the ownen and later became General Agent and 
cootmned in that caucitr for •everal yors and 
left to pilot the Falack Bros. Enterprises and 
when the Mngnsfan-Ballard Interest purchased the 
-Sdl-Fkto Circitt Hr. Warner was again engaged 
■ for his fbmcr position and held ame to his 
death. 



ol BI7 dHT Fathar 



LEOPOLD FREED 

«te dM 1. m . - 

JOE FREED 

May- Us soul raat fa pTa, 



Mr. Waincr was considered one of the best 
General Agents and Tnffic Managera in th: 
basineaS| he had a veir wide acqnamtance with 
practically all of the Rauroad Agents In U. S. and 
Canada, and every one with whom he came in 
ctntact apoke in the highsst terms of his business 
methods. Mr. Warner was buried with full 
MasKiie Ilororr by the Columbian Conunandcry, 
Chicago, Thursday. April 5th. He W£S a member 
of the Facilic Lod^e ol Masonry. New Yurk, and 
besides his ledge's there wer: several beautiful 
Floral Offerings from his many friends.- The 
SellvFInto Circus which opened at the Colisenm, 
Chicago, AprQ 7th. arrived in tcwn early in the 
wc£k from winter quarters, Peru, Ind. and the 
aitiie Company along with a great many show 
Fclks attended the services. 

Mlaa Waggle Oabv vaudeville actress, died 
Sunday. April 8tb, in St. Michael's Hospital. 
Toronto, Canada, of pneumonia at tbc age of 63 



She made her first stag: appearuce io 1879 
in an act known as the Sl Clair Sisters. Sbe 
hter toured the -United States and Canada with 
htf husband as "Casey and St. Clair." When 
taken ill. Miss St. Clair was appearing at a 
local theatre in Torontc, with a troupe cf former 
vaudrville headliners. 

Harry Van flira died in Pr esent t. Arixcma. 
on Satnrday. AprQ 17, after several years* illness 
with tnbcmllar troublel \Vlien last seen in 
vaudeville, he had been doing the act with his 
mole, known as '^'an Oevc and Pete." For 
manj years, the act was calletl "Van Oeve. 
' Dcntoo and Pete.** the other humrn in tbr not 
bcinK bis late wife. He wa.< fifry-li -c yeirii o!d. 



ENRICO RASTELU 

Theatre— Po/oTf. 
StfiB— Juggling. 
Hmfi F ifteen minutes. 
Settiaz— Fu// stage. 

Rastelli is assisted by a man and wom- 
an in evening dress, while he himself is 
dad in yellow silk blonse and knicker- 
bockers, and works against a back- 
ground of red plush curtains, rich but 
modest and in good taste. 

Wliatever he does, he accomplishes 
without a moment of stalling, with suffi- 
cient confidence, and unusual finesse, in 
fact,' almost remarkable finish. He did 
a minimum number of tricks With a 
maximum amount of showmanship, evi- 
dently having learned a few things and 
learned them well. The flash, and attempt 
to impress the audience was noticeably 
absent and hot one of the faults of this 
offering. 

He opened by juggling some sticks, 
apparently simple, and later used a rub- 
ber ball about three inches in diameter, 
with the sticks. The ball was frequently 
balanced on one of the sticks, etc., as 
well as on his liead and rolled across his 
shoulders. He also bounced the ball 
upon his. head while he jugsled several 
disks and spun the sticks. His unusual 
sense of balance allowed him to balance 
and whirl the ball on the end of the stick 
tield in his mouth and do other tricks 
along the same lines, such as juggle nine 
hard paper plates. 

Some clever risley work was done, 
Rastelli mounting a large silver cup on 
a table and juggling a rod, etc., with his 
feet, sometimes being balanced on one 
hand and doing various things with the 
other. Later, while blindfolded, he did 
more risley work, of an intricate nature, 
making his feet and hands do different 
feats at the same time. For the finale, 
a bit of a flash was necessary and he 
whirled a large object like a starfish, 
with his feet and juggled sticks with his 
hands and whirled something else with 
one of his feet not used in connection 
with the big starfish. Probably nothing 
sensational is evident to some in Ras- 
~ tclli's routine, but it's not the tricks, but 
the way they're done, as is the case with 
many other things. M. H. S. 



Elaine Ivans has replaced Fania Mari- 
nofl ill "The Love Habit." 



HUGO RIESENFELD 

Theatre— Po/acf. 

StyXo— Orchestra. 

Time — Thirty minutes. 

Setting— FuH stage (special). 

Jazz orchestras have jazzed the 
classics, and Riescnfeld is symphonizing 
popular music, thus creating Classical 
Jazz." The >work of the director and 
his musicians is well known and liked 
by the many patrons who go to the 
Kialto and Kivoli motion (iicture the- 
atres,' the orchestras being credited with 
having "made" both the houses when 
they opened, a few years ago. Of course 
there IS no reason why a competent or- 
gan. zation of 55 musicians should miss, 
ill v.-<.udevi'le or any other sort of theatre. 

The efforts of the musicians were 
madi' more cITective by stage setting be- 
hind a shut-in down stage, designed and 
constructed according to the program, 
by the Famous Players-Lasky Corpora- 
tion's Long Island Studio. The open- 
ing selection, "1812 Overture," by P. 
Tsrhaikowsky, has done duty often in 
the first run movie houses along Broad- 
way, and being a descriptive piece of 
mus!c allowed the orchestra suiGcient 
range for expression and effects. A film 
preceded the first mnnbcr, telling about 
Napoleon' and his retreat, etc, which 
seems superfluous in a way. In the back- 
ground for the climax of the selection a 
miniature set depicting the burning of 
Moscow was a remarkable bit of 
ingenuity and highly effective with 
tupplini; buildings, etc., and the flames 
gradiially spreading through the city. 

•Coming down to "Oassical Jazz," 
"Chicago," as it might be played in 
various foreign countries was done. A 
slide, that started on one side of the house 
announced each country, etc, attracting 
attention as it moved along toward the 
center of the stage. Two colored page 
boys with a placard announced the songs, 
etc. This style of arrangement has been 
done in many theatres by orchestras 
throughout the city, especially houses 
that play both vaudeville and picture. 

"Three o'Clock in the Morning," was 
the next selection, two or three soloists 
sing at different times, and at the con- 
clusion the setting in the background was 
a girl shooting arrows at the ball in 
the belfry, etc. "My Buddy" followed 
and one other published number popular 
last season. M. H. S. 



UOIES 
Alawd, BtlH 
Asm, Mila 
lUUcr. Un- E. 
Brood, KiUilem 
C^mtte, B«Ble 
ObKUs, Ins 
Ficldliic. Pf Tillnit 
Fbrtes, Qrwe 
Btliic. Suite 
Juten, Annl 
giwpfnw Lor- 

nlm 
L* But, Bonlce 
lUnhtll, <feia 

Itan. Nlu 



Bappo Slslm 
ffilUa. UvUu 

& Adu 
Wiliiiltr, Sm 
nuUUB, Hn. 

E. & 
WUjoo, Juqn 

CHTLEMEM 

AsU»fK7, Jock 
Bsrtoo, Qurla 
BcdTon) * Otr- - 

BUn), mU 
Braots. Wtllle 
Btvno, Itmuor 
FaanjDf. Ftuk 
Fturr. Gordon 



Healr. Mbn 
Hon, Burad 
Eont, Fluk 
JeoDlnv. CUffortf 
KaltoD. AlTui 
KaoiHdr. BtD H 
I^rlae. ChtrUo 
Lou. Joks W. 
Hanball, O. 0. 
OillHJUdfr, Hftny 
Bulcr, Eotart 
~ Ddt, Edwud 



Wm. A. P. 

Vtlsb. Urn i. 
WoUo, 1M 



'WTOWN WEST" IS CLEVER 

"Uptown West" presented by the 
Matinee Players at the Earl Carroll 
Theatre for the first time last week, 
is a melo-dramatic play dealing with 
the troubles encountered by a Japanese 
man married to a white woman. Lincoln 
Osborn is the author and unfolds his 
plot delicately enough to keep it from 
being blatantly forced. 

Sakamoto is a Japanese immigrant 
who falls in love and marries Mildred, 
an American girl from the Middle West. 
He finds that he and his wife are drift- 
ing apart and does all in his power 
to prevent this, being more than kind 
and gracious in his attempts to hold 
her love. A child is born and instead 
of serving . as a bridge this merely 
widens the gap as his wife is always 
looking for the father's racial charac- 
teristics in the child and fearing to 
find them. The child dies and a former 
sweetheart of the wife's turns up. The 
husband goes away to give his wife 
her freedom, but cannot stand the sepa- 
ration. He comes back, kills his wife's ' 
sister by mistake and then kills himself. 

The play is not a sweet play but 
it is well acted and deftly handled. 
Henry Herbert, as the Japanese, de- 
parts from the accepted manner of 
playing this part and contributes a re- 
markable piece of work. Florence 
Mason is excellent as the Ahierican 
wife and the others are adequate. 

GEORGE DUPREE, 

1547 Braadwar. Nrw York. VainkvCll* acU 
hmilfthcd; optnlng aecuml. Duprrc*, Bl^'Budfat 
Just 'Out. Pulpald tl.ao. 



ONLY AND ORIGINAL 



ANOROS & JANET 



THE COMEDY SCREAM 



Direction IRVING COOPER 



'•MON CHAPEAU" 



April 11, 1923 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



31 



E. F. ALBEE 
Preudent 



J. J. MUROOCK 
Gaiural Mmnrngar 



P. F. PROCTOR 
Vice-Pmident 



B. F. 

Vaudeville Exchange 

(AGENCY) 

(Palaca Tlieatn Building, New York) 
B. F. KEITH EDWARD F. ALBEE A. PAUL KEITH 
F. F. PROCTOR— FOUNDERS 
AFtisto Cu Book Direct bj Aildrgisiai W. Dmyten Watafulli 



PUYS 



For STOCK, REPERTOIRE, AHATEUR COMPAMIES 
LAXCBSr ASSOKTlfKNT IIT IHK WOBIA Books, far htmt 
Negie plan. Papor, Seanacy, Mn. Jaibr'a Was 
Tnat n«al Vkaet 

■t, Nov TaA 



Woffca. Cktakna Fnal 

SMOW. F1IMNCH, M Waat 



Insure Your Material Against Theft 

REGISTER YOUR ACT 

SEND IN YOUR MATERIAL 

THIS COUPON will be numbered and attached and a certificate will be rttutned to 
TOO aa an acknowledfinent and for (uttirc reference. The contiibation ihould be aigned 
plaint/ b)r the person or firm scndiog the same, and shotild be endorsed by the stage 
manager of the show or of the house where the act is being used, or other witnesses. 
Further acknowledgment will be made hj the names and numbers being published. 

Address 70ur contribution to 

The RegUtry Bureau 

NEW YORK aUPPER, 1« Braahnr, Ktw Yoril 



Date 

NEW YORK CUPPER REGISTRY BUREAU 



Enclosed find copy of my. 



enbllMl 

for' Ra(iatTmtion. 

Nu 



Addreaa 



CERTIFICATES ISSUED 



1735 — Harold A. Keene — Song 

1736 — ^Three Kcnards — Act. 

1737 — Marris & Bernard — Song. 

1738 — PcTTv Glass — Song Poems. 

1739— Reed & Blake— Material. 

1740 — Jennings & Melba — Novelty Costume. 

1741— Brian M.Iewett— Title. 

1742 — ^Wyse tc Brue— Title. . 



1743— R. Brownlee — Act. 

1744 — Harrcy Sanford — Poems. 

1745 — Lou Altdl — Song Title. 

1746 — Anton Lada — Orchestra Titles. 

1747 — Donna Daxling— Song. 

1748 — Sidney B. HoTcomh — Ljrics. 

1749 — ^Thomas Sigurdson — Lyrics & Music. 



WORTH 
WHILE 



Toupees Make-Up 

Sad for Pries list 
a. fiHINDHELM 
10* W. 4«th St., New Yorti 



CENTRAL WARDROBE 




45 



.00 



Eiiul to any 

$60.00 Tink 

CtiUtl Traok 

FacloiT 
SUONSftCO. 

im Arch St. 
PhOa. 



MONEY WRITING SONGS 

A auccBSsful nualc coimioscr and puhUsliar 
writes a book oaptalnlng bow to Dake imey 
puUlshlag saiga. Contcals: C oi iu cllu g Your 
Faulta, Writing a Melody, DitocUag tho' Am- 
UUoua Yoog Cosoposer, Pladng Yoiir Songs 
Befoiv the Public Lists ovar SM Music Deal- 
era — 2M Band and Orchaatra Lea^ra. You 
need thia book, only obo of Ita kind csi the 
markat. Onlr SIM Postpaid. Maawr back If 
you aay ao. UNION MUSIC COMPANY, 315 
East Fifth St., dncinnati, Ohio. 



Every Manager and Agent 

SHOULD OWN a cepy of 
THE JULIUS CAHN-CUS HILL GUIDE 

containing 
All the Essential Facta of tba Show 
Business. 

20th Edition, Price $300 net— I9Z1 
21st Edition Sopplemoic, Price $1J0 net 
—1922. $4J0 Complete 

JUUUS CAHN— GUS HILL GUIDE 
Raosa m, TH Tth An, Naw Yoik 



BERT LEVEY 
CIRCUIT 

VAUDEVILLE THEATRES 

Alcaau- Thoatro BoUfnt 
SAN FRANCISCO 



LET US PROVE^^ IT IS BEST 
113 Weat 48lli St., Now York 



WIGS 



Baal Homaa Hair Imnaitai 

man, Olswa, fl.SS oacfi. Na. _ 

WM. Tlgbbi. tlJO. Hair Iloatacba or Ooatsa. XSe. Oiano 
Balr, p. yard. SBe. . JOLKOLINa _TI«hta er tttitSL tXS 



Ush OsBsdlaa. Jaw. Salsk. 
Nana, SCk:., OOc, VLOa Lady wtt, 

r Iloatacba or Ooatsa. XSe. r 

nLKOUNB nghta ar ahMaL 

Blag or FIB. Sk. Oold Hlitone 

ring pp. scc. Paper Bata, 80e. 4oaa. Cataloc ttaa. 
ova XUmBT, M Obsiw St., *aw Talk. 



p. yai«. 30c 

Ina DlaaaBd Blag or Fin. 1 



STAGE SHOES 

Entire companies and indi- 
viduals capably served in a 
courteous manner. 

AOIsdebiSqemidby LUkr 

1. MILLER & SONS 

New York 
1S54 Broadway at 46tli St. 

Chicago 
State and Monroe Streets 

Largtit Uuutfteturtri of Thtatrinl Foot- 
war »md BMH SKfttrt in- lk» Wortd. 



CLIPPER 

BUSINESS INDEX 

ANIMALS 

Henry Bartels, 72 Cottlandt St^ New York. 
Louis Ruhc, 35 1. Bowery, New York. 
Wm. Bartels Co., 44 Cortlsndt St., New York 
City. 

BAZAAR A EXPOSITION SUPPLIES 

Bloch Premium Sales Corporation, 28 West 32nd 
St.. New York City. 

LAWYERS 

F. U Boyd, 17 No. La Salle St., Chicago. 
SCENERY 

Kahn &. Bouwman Scenic Studio 

1S5 W. 29th St., N. Y. City. Chelsea 89S6. 

SCENERY FOR RENT 
Amelia Grain, 819 Spring Garden St., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

TENTS 

J. C. Goss Co., 10 Atwaler St., DeUoit, Mich. 
Send for Second'band list. 



SCENERY 

DUmOBd Dy», OO or Watar Colors 

SCHELL SCEinC STUDia COLUMBUS. O. 



Mlaacy psitau t €t tba thaatrical piufiaafcai aac 

TAYLOR TRUNKS 

Write for oar thaatrlfsl ealdkne. TAYLOR 
TRUNK WORKS, S71 If. HaUtadIt, CkkmiQ, O. 




. S<rid by tlw FWIowkag 

WATCH THIS UST CROWI^ 

NEW YORK CITY. 

William Bal Company. 3» Weat jMh St. 

Edward Gtopper, Inc., U9D Btoadwsy. 
ALBANY. N. Y. 

Weeks Tmnk Cotnpany, 511 Broadny. 
BOSTON. MASS. 

Hie Ftocadniy Sen ■> Beylatna St. 
BUFFALO, N. Y. 

Moran Brotheia, 3(7 . WaaUagtao St. 
CHARLESTON. S. C _ 

Charieatni Trank Otaopuy, Vt XiaB at. 
CLEVELAND^ OHIO. 

Ohk> Horse Goods Co., 1744 KaM Wk St. 
GRAND RAFina. WOL 

Grand RaaUa Trunk Co., 331 DbWoa 
St., SoQli- 
POTTSVILLE, PENNA. 

H. R. Knappk 201 Soath CbIt* 81. 
SYRACUSE. N. V. 

. Synmae TVimk Wcska. 444 Soath SaBna 
Street. 
TOLEDO, O. 

The Wilmlagtao Col, 2S Summit At*. 
TROY, N. Y. 

W. H. Frcar & Oampany 

whjces barre. pknna. * 

Pms < ft Yeager, 9 Main Sbaat. 
WORCESTER. MASS. 

The Baggage Shop, 573 Mala Out 
Had* and Csaiasitisi hy 

WILUAM BAL COMPANY 
NEWARK NEW 



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A GENUINE NOVELTY— A SENSATION WHEREVER SUNG 

CRYING FOR YOU 

Another Hit by the Writers of "Why Should I Cry Over Yon?"— Ned Miller and Chester Cohn 



TED LEWIS with •■Greenwich Village Fellies" 
Is a sensation singing 

WHEN THE 
LEAVES COME 
TUMBLING DOWN 

By RICHARD HOWARD 
GREAT BALLAD WONDERFUL MELODY 



OH, WHAT A RIOT 



RONNir 
WILD 

This Great Jazz Tnne wonld have made a 
big hit with old King '*Tnt"— 



By Joe Ray, Leo Wood, 
A. Harrington Gibbs 



The Ballad Beautiful 

WONDERFUL 



BY PAUL WHTTEMAN, DOROTHY FERRISS, 
FERDIE GROFE, MARSHALL NEHAN 



A RealBalM. Great Itaroiooy Soi%! 

in a corner 
o;f the world 
all our own 

By JESSE CRAWFORD 
and GUS KAHN 



SAM nUNCBCO 
n ■■111 TWam UHa( 


You can't go wrong with any FEIST song 


• 

CHIOCO 

Ut Ma. CM WL 


•OSTON 
IB TtsM Stivt 
D^TIUUT 
l« Lmmmt St. 
TQMNTO 


LEO FEIST, Inc. 


MINNEAPOLIS 
t Lrnc T1i«tr« BiuMiac 
FHILADELTHIA 
mi.Hufc^t St. 
KAtOAS CITY 


OrNUNNATI 


711 Seventh Ave. New York 


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2 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 25, 1923 



A GENUINE NOVELTY— A SENSATION WHEREVER SUNG 

CRYING FOR YOU 

Another Hit by the Writers of "Why Should I Cry Over You?"— Ned Miller and Chester Cohn 



I^OH, WHAT A RIOT 

RUNNIN 
WILD 

This Great Jazz Tone wonld have made a 
big hit with old King "Tnt"— 



By Joe Ray, Leo Wood, 
A. Harrington Gibbs 



The Great Jazz-Blues Rag Song 

YOU'VE GOT TO 
SEE MAMMA 
EV'RY NIGHT 

(Or You Can't See Maninia.At All) 

By BILLY ROSE and CON CONRAD 
A Positive HitI The title tells the tale 



THE BALLAD BEAUTIFUL 

WONDERFUL 
ONE 

Written by PAUL WHTTEMAN— FERDIE GROFE on 
a theme by MARSHALL NEILAN. Lyric by DOR- 
OTHY TERISS^ author of "Three CClock m the 
Morning." 



Just Released! 
Biggest Dance Hit of the Year! 

SAW MILL 
ROAD 



The song hit of the musical comedy '^GLORY' 
by JOE McCarthy and HAKRY 
TIERNEY, writers of "IRENE." 



■Alt nwtcueo 


You can't go wrong with any FEIST song 


V 

CHICAGO 
UT No. Ckik St. 


BOSTQM 

TOKOMIU 


LEO FEIST, Inc. 


MINNEAPOLJS 
a Lrric TbMtr* BuJdlay 
PHILAOELPHIA 
Id Maibt Sl 
KANSAS cm 


■i T«M« SMi 

dficnntATi 

a«-^n— 


711 Seventh Ave. New York 


Ctn'T Tktmxn BaiUiar 
LOS AMCELCS 
4» Wmi Filik A««. 



CopTright. 1923, ud paWibcd wcddjr bj tbc ClipRtr Copondea, l<M Bnadnj, New York. Eatcnd at tk« Vtm Ote M Ni 

MCood daH mill matter ndcr act of ICarcb 3, 1879 



r«v Tart. Joe 34. 1879, aa 



FoQsdttl by 
rSANK QUEST, IBS] 



NEW YORK. APRIL 25. 1923 



VOLUME LXXI, Na 12 
PricT Klficrn I'enta. 85.00 a Yaar' 



THEATRE EMPLOYEES TO DEMAND 
WAGE INCR EASE FOR N EXT SEASON 

Stage Hands, Picture Madiine Oporaton, Musicians Are Pre- 
paring to Demand Raises Ranging fnnn Ten to Twenty 
Per Coat — Musicians in the Lead. 



Managers of theatres and road attrac- 
tions will this summer be confronted with 
demands from stage hands, motion picture 
machine operators and musicians for an 
increase in wages beginning with the 1923- 
24 season in September. Though no offi- 
cial demands or inkling of a demand has 
as yet come to the notice of the managerial 
organizations, overtures for increases are 
expected from the stage craft and musi- 
cians which will run from 10 to 20 per- 
cent according to the prevailing wage con- 
ditions in other industries in the various 
parts of the United States and Canada. 

During the past month industrial corpo- 
rations, mills and factories throughout the 
country have been announcing that they 
had increased the wages of their employ- 
ees, voluntarily, from ten to twenty per 
cent. Then recently the United States 
Railway Labor Board announced that it 
was holding hearings for the establish- 
ment of an increased wage scale for rail- 
road employees. 

Receiving reports of this nature, the 
theatre employees decided that as long as 
a reign of prosperity was returning and 
that men employed in industries, factories 
and mills were getting an increase in their 
wages, living conditions would be changed 
9pi the cost of living would naturally be 
increased with the increase in pay of resi- 
dents of a community, so therefore, the 
men employed about the theatre in cities 
and towns throughout the country in dis- 
cussions they have had inside and outside 
of union circles have signified their in- 
tentions of demanding an increase in wages 
so that they could adjust their mode of 
living according to the prevelant costs of 
commodities and necessities. 

From indications, it is likely, that the 
American Federation of Musicians will 
come forward with the largest average 
demand for increase of wages of its mem- 
bers throughout the country. This in- 
crease will not he sought for the organi- 
zations separately by the parent body as 
each organization, with the exception of 
local 802 of New York, has local .auton- 
■omy and may bargain with the managers 
on their own account Local 802, in its 
treaties with the managers will be com- 
Dclled to get the consent of Joseph N. 
Weber, president of the A. F. of M., for 
any demands that they may submit to the 
various manager's . organizations with 
which they do business. 

The Kew York organization, however, 
will probaUy demand a larger percentage 
of increase than any of the other organi- 
zations affiliated with the A. F. of M. 
They will do this on the ground that men 
working in Chicago, Philadelphia, Newark 
and other cities throughout the country 
are being paid a minimum scale of wages 
which is from ten to thirty-five, per cent 



in excess of that paid the members of the 
New Yoilc men. It is likely that their 
demands will call for an average increase 
of twenty-five per cent for men employed 
in New York theatres. They will also 
make demands for very liberal increase 
of the wages for men travelling with road 
comi»anies. They claim that local men 
playing in theatres in most of the larger 
dties of the country are better paid than 
a musician who is compelled to travel 
with an attraction and pay for their own 
subsistence and lodging while on tour. 
The road scale for musicians travellbg 
out of New York with an attraction is 
$65, while in most of the larger dties in 
theatres which play musical attractions the 
mintmnm scale is $75 a week. It is said, 
that the New York local will submit a 
scale calling for a minimum of $90 a 
wedc and sleepers for men on tour next 
season. For men playing in theatres hous- 
ing musical attractions in New York, a 
tentative demand will call for an increase 
of $17.50 a man minimum which will place 
the wages of the men at $75 a week which 
will be equivalent to the scale being paid 
men in Philadelphia. The present mini- 
mum the New York men receive is $57 JO 
a week for dght performances. 

For vaudeville theatres and high class 
motion picture houses which employ large 
orchestras it is exi>ected an average of 
twenty-five per cent increase will be asked 
above the present scale of wages. 

It is expected that the matter of a coun- 
try wide increase of wages will be taken 
up at the meeting and convention of the 
American Federation of Musicians on 
May 7th in St. Louis and that resolutions 
will be passed calling attention to the in- 
creased pay men are recdving in other in- 
dustries and setting forth the fact that the 
musicians who have taken up their pro- 
fession as a life's work should be given 
equal recognition by their employers and 
have their wages increased as well. 

These resolutions will he the advance 
"courier" of the demands that will be pre- 
sented late in June by the numerous locals 
to the managers and managers' organiza- 
tions, throughout tlie country, with whom 
they do business. 

In Chicago the musicians, stage bands 
and motion picture operators all will make 
requests for substantial increases in wages. 
In the other larger cities the demands will 
be not as much as those made in Chicago 
but will average in the three branches of 
stage craft ab(Mit twenty per cent 

The New York local of the Internation- 
al Alliance of Theatrical Suge Employees 
and Motion Picture Operators of the 
United States and Canada which covers 
the stage employees of greater New York 
will shortly appoint a committee for the 
(^Continued on page 6) 



I. T. A- ANNUAL MEETING 
« 

_ The International Theatrical Associa- 
tion composed of theatre owners and 
managers of the United States and Canada 
will hold thdr annual meeting and elec- 
tion of officers at the Pennsylvania Hold 
on June 18th. It is expected that more 
than 1,000 theatre owners and managers 
from all parts of the country will be pres- 
ent 

As yet no plan or program for the meet- 
ing has beeii outlined. This will be done 
at a meeting of the Board of Directors 
which will be hdd witiun two wedcs. 

It is expected that some of the impor- 
tant problems and questions that will be 
submitted will be the mstter of revision of 
railroad rates and the legislation of state 
tax on amusements. Labor conditions ^d 
wages will probably be included in the 
discnssioa. 



20 PER CDTT TAX FOR SHOWS 

The South Carolina legislature has 
passed a law adding a ten per cent tax on 
all traveling shows that come into the 
State, which' added to the Federal tax of 
ten fier cent makes a total of twenty per. 
cent ' .or enough to prohibit theatrical at- 
tractions from cntenng the State. 

Both the Prodocing Managers'. Assoda-. 
tioa and the Actors' Equity are maldng a 
coiKerted effort to have the South Carohna 
governor and a committee annul the law 
which they have the power to do. Frank 
Gilmore. executive secretary of the Actors' 
Equity, and George Nicoha, of the Pro- 
ducing Managers* Association, have been 
in communication with Governor McLeod 
of South Carolina requesting him to re- 
move "the obstacle" that adds sufficient 
money onto the box office price to prevent 
outside shows from entering the State. 

The restdts of the protests are being 
watched dosely by all managers. 



PHILA. ORCHCSTRA IN FILM HOUSE 

Philadelphia, April 23.— Leopold Sto-' 
kowski, with the famous Philadelphia or- 
chestra will io^iught (Wednesday) play a' 
special concert at the Stanley film theatre 
as a compliment to the interest shown in 
and the efforts made by th£ Stanley Com- 
pany to uplift imisic 

Mr. Stokowski will bring his entire 
orchestra of 110 musicians to the theatre 
and the concert will begin at 9 P. M. 
The regular program of the theatre 
will be cut to one presentation at 7 
o'clock. 

The Philade^ihia Orchestra l]as become 
a national institution. Its fame has 
reached Europe, and musical America is 
watching the progress of the orchestra. 



2 MORE WEEKS FOR "VENGEANCE" 

"The GoiJ of Vengeance" which moved 
last week from the Apollo Theatre to the 
Prospect Theatre, Bronx, has become a 
fascinating attraction for the '^ronxites" 
with the result that Harry Clay Blaney has 
decided to continue its engagement for an- 
other two weeks. The attraction is play- 
ing at a $1.50 top in the Bronx while on 
Broadway $2.50 top was charged. 



"PRIDE" LOOKS LIKE A HIT 

Stahfobd, April 20.— Tbocnpsaa Bn- 
cfaanan's new comedy. "Pride," was giyea 
its premier tonight at the Stamford Th^ 
atre under tho managerial anspiccs ot 
Oliver Morosco, with Hilda Spang and 
Juliet Day carrying off stellar honors in 
the leading rolesl 

In die devdopoient of the plot, the Doc 
dc Valmoot, married to an American heir- 
ess, became separated from her becanse she 
objected to his.attentioiO'to others. Their 
daughter, educated in it convem, is brought 
to America fay her mother, and loses no 
time in b estowin g her affections upon ai 
young man in this country. At ahoot the 
same time appears the Doc, seeking a. jdki 
as a waiter from his former valet who 
has become the proprietor of several botds.' 
Persisting in his determination to 'earn • 
living, he takes menial employment His 
first and subsequent encounters with the 
Duchess, and the filial affection awak- 
ened in the ilaaghter's breast for Urn be- 
fore she stispccts that the waker is.'licr 
fatbei) f midics some of the mtercMinc 
aitoationa in the ^y, which is brongfat to 
a happy coodnsion, when the girl maJEC* 
her happineu cotnplcte by aoconqriishiiic 
the reunion of her parents, and there 18 mr 
suggestion at the dose that the Dochen it 
to restore the chateau that maj a target for 
German ammtnition while die Dnc was 
fighting for France. 

. The girl's lover doesn't caie, apparently, 
tha^ I'lns fatlier-in-hfr had beconte a 
waiter, in which he diiffers frcm hb snob*' 
bish sister and her idle and ntdess hos-. 
band, whose thirst for alcoholic beverages 
is satisfied by cocktails sierved tinder tfaa 
name of dam broth — a reminder of one 
of the deceptions practised in this boot-leg-' 
ging age. 

Hilda Spang, as the Dndiess, and JtiUet 
Day, as Audrey Vabnoot, were remark- 
ah^ good in thdr respective roles and 
easdy captured first honors of the evemn^ 
Herman Leib gave a faithful ddineatkn. 
of the Due who^ after a frivolns lif^ bod 
an awakening as a result of war, and tasted 
happoess when for the first time he earned 
a living by honest if menial labor. 



To. know 
how good a oigaretto 
really ean be 

you must try . 




cosxuivf Es ,js:zs:s;!i',£::i."ss^j,- brooks-hmnieu .4^v. n. y. vs?^ 



4 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 25, 1923 



OlTEDdPR AMUSEMENTS TARGET 
FOR SC ORES OF LE GISLATURES 

Dozeiw of BiOs Aimed at Barring Outdoor Shows, Carnivals and 
Ez|iositions Introduced in Number of States — Canuval Mm 
Feel That United Actimi to Clear Up Situaticm b Needed 



The oatdoor show, including carnivals 
and fairs, and animal exhibitions, has for 
some reason become the target for ambi-, 
tions legislatnres and imless concerted ac- 
tion is taken by, the members of this form 
of anmsement, against the «aany new bills 
irinch have been introdnced in state legis- 
latnres tbroQghout the cbtmtry, there will 
soon be bat few states in wtuch ontdoor 
shows and carnivals will be allowed to 
play. The latest states in which bills have 
Deen brought up prohibiting carnivals, 
fairs, and traveling open-air shows, . are 
PcDnsylvania, Illinois and Minnesota. 

In the Peimsylvaiua Honse. of. Represen- 
tatnres, a bill introduoed by Mr. Edmonds, 
defines a "travelling carnival company," 
as "any itinerant organiiatioo or aggrega- 
tfca by whatsoevetr. name, moving about 
the. comtiy on raflroad c^, motor or 
bone-propelled vehicles, giving perform- 
ances or exhibitions for pay, in one,, or 
more tents, wagons or other taadosures, 
and having wi& it ooncessipn^ ] such as 
trfaat are commonly caUedjjdoll, 'blanket, 
Imife; umbrella and teddy, bear racks, 
^ames of chance, or games of so-called 
science and skill, whether .'or not all or 
part of such shows.and devices are. .under 
separate ownership,' or under one manage- . 
ment and controL 

This definitiofl is given -in section one 
of the bill, and section two isi.to the -fol- 
lowing effect": <!i 

"traveling companies are'«hCrd>y de* 
cleared to be .detriinental to*' the public 
peace; health and public morals, 'and°<9tre 
Dereby prohibited from 'operating within 

fVwiliii/i nw mltli " . > 1' 

The penalty intthe Commonwealth, of.. 
Pennsylvania, to anyiperson,.'ccfriiora^oii, 
association or copartnersb^ ,'anording to 
the bill, is « . fine' of not len than one 
faimdred dollars or more than three -hun- 
dred doUan, or to midergo isbprisonment 
of not more than six months,. or bo^ or 
each offense. Each day a carnival' coii^' . 



pany is operated, is to be considered a 
separate and distinct offense under the pro- 
visions of this act, if passed. The bill also 
prbviHes' fEat 'all property, "of whatsoever 
kind, . or .aatore used in - the - operation or ■ 
coimected with the operation of any travel- . 
ing company, in violation of the provisions 
of this act is, and shall be forfeited to the 
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania." 

If the owner' of thb property is con- 
victed, it will be sold at public auction, 
and the proceeds to be paid to the school 
fund in. the district of wherever the carnival 
wa^' operated. 

Another bill introdnced in the Penn- 
sylvania legislature by Mr. Kennedy, pro- 
h3>its 'shows whicK include racing of any 
character, whether "vehicles, or animals, 
or aiir craft, or water-craft, or to engage 
in or to promote any game or sport of 
any character 'whatsoever where a fee is 
charged for adnnssioo," on 'Memorial Day, 
May 30. 

One bill introdnced in Illinois, prohibits 
anifnal acts in theatres, parks or any -plea- 
sure resort ; another bans all Stmday amuse- 
ments, and requires that all circuses,' car- 
nivals, fairs, parks and all forms of out- 
door, amusements and entertaininents be 
dosed on Sunday. Still another is directed 
against shell games, paddle wheels, or any 
other game or gambling scheme or de- 
vice at any carnival, circus -fair, or other 
like place of amusement. Possession of 
any such device at any such place, will be 
considered ^prima facie evident that ' the 
possessor is violating; the provisions' of the 
act. A fourth bill calls for the prohibition 
of carnivals, fairs, or any other form of 
transient amusement in the entire state. 
The penalty mentioned in this bill is a fine 
from CS ,to $500, a year in jail, or both. 

A bifi introduced in the State of Minne- 
sota oils for the' banishment of all itiner- 
ant ^carnivals, -and-: declares them public 
nilisances. -Violations of- this act subject 
the operator- to a charge of being guilty 
of a misdemeanor. 



LAUDER FOR THE MANHATTAN 

?'r Harry Lauder when he completes his 
American tour in New York next spring, 
prior to sailing for England, will' appear 
at the Manhattan Opera House, instead 
of at the Lexington Avenue Opera House, 
as heretofore. 'William Morris closed nego- 
tiatioas for the former place last wedc, 
as the future of the tatter theatre is nn- 
detcnnmed. 

'When Lauder resumes his American, 
tour at_ San Francisco on October 16t]i, 
upon his return from Australia he will 
have two well established English acts 
added, to his supporting company. One of 
Aem; Edna Maude, a dancer is described 
as bong another Adelaide Genee, the pre- 
mier dancer. Miss Maude has appeared 
on numerous bills in England preceeding 
Sir Harry Lauder and at practically every 
^low the cmrtain was held on the Scotdi 
onnedian until Miss . Mande had acknowl- 
edged munerous encores. The other mem- 
ier added 'is Olga Morselli, a 'violinist who 
faas achieved a repotation of standing in 
the English music balls. 

'MOUNTEBANK" COMING IN 

"Ttie Moimtebank" a dramatization of 
'William Jl Locke's novd by Locke and 
&nest Denny whicli was jiresented several 
weeks ago bjr 'Frederic Mackay, manager 
of the Empire .Theatr^ at the Broad 
Street '^lrealt^^ Fhiladdphia will succeed 
lionel Atwill 'in "The Comedian" at the 
Lycenm Theatre on May 7Ql. 'When the 

Stay has its New Yort . presentation it will 
e sponsored by Charles Rrohman, Inc., in- 
stead of Mackay, as the former did not 
-want to lend their' mme to the attraction 
in tikC Uyuui stages. 



"HITCHY" CLEANING UP 

Raymond Hitchcock in his new revue,- 
"Hitchy Koo of 1923," has developed into 
such a bonanra throughout the middle' 
west, where it has been -playing split-week 
and one-night, that Messers. Jones and 
Green, producers of the show, are scram- 
bling about for additional time in the 
"stix." The present booking will keep 
the Hitchcock show going until May 1. It 
was tentatively decided to bring the piece 
into Chicago for a run after that date. But. 
Hitchcock's takings on the road have been 
so enormous that the management would 
prefer to prolong the road engagements 
before brin^g the piece- to either New 
York or Chicago for a metropolitan nm. 



TWO SUITS.. AGAINST HOLTZ 

Lou Holtz,'.oomedlan, is made defendant 
in two activos started against him last week 
in the Third District Munidpal Court. 
One of the suits is for $1,000 damages, 
claimed by Charles Broda, who allegies he 
was injured as a result of being struck by 
an automobile being driven by Holtz re- 
cently in front of the Winter Garden The- 
atre. 

The other suit is for-^ 50.00, instituted 
by Hany Saks Hechheimer, attorney who 
alleges that amount is doe him for profes- 
sional services roidered. 



VAN '& 5CHENCK FOR REVUE 

Charles Dillingham has engaged Van 
and Schenck for the new 'Willie Collier 
and Sam Bernard revue which he will pre- 
sent at the Fnlton Theatre late in August 



ANDERSON TO DO NEW "FOLLIES" 

Whatever differences, if any, that may 
have existed between John Murray- Ander- 
son and Bohemians, Inc., producers of 
''Greenwich Village Follies," has been 
amicably adjusted and it is announced that 
Anderson will direct the fifth annua l edi- 
tion of the "Follies." 

Anderson was the originator of this 
series of summer musical shows, not only 
haying been a founder of Bohemians, Inc., 
for he has staged the four annual pro- 
ductions of the series. According to re- 
ports, Anderson disposed of his interest ia-i< 
the corporation to Arthur Pearson, the 
burlesque' producer,. -after :the-'rfirst show, - 
' his interest in the others beug in the na- 
ture of stage director. In addition to re- 
ceiving a-'weddy compensation' for" the re- 
hearsal and preparation periods Anderson 
has also been recdving a royalty of two 
and one-half per cent of the gross on all of 
the shows of the series. 

Anderson had a contract with Bohemi- 
ans, which expired with the-current edition 
of the revue. When approached for a -re-- - 
newal by Al Jones and Morris Green, man- 
aging directors of the corporation he is 
said to have titled his percentage terms. 
Later he bolted and formed the -Chelsea 
Producing Company, who are sponsoring 
his current musical production, ' Jack and 
JiU," at the Globe. Late list week An- - 
derson affixed his signature to another con- 
tract with Bohemians, arranging for his 
staging the forthcoming edition of the 
show. Ndther side, however, would dis- 
cuss the terms of the contract, but it is 
generally conceded that Anderson's terms 
were met. 

Anderson is constantly brushing up the 
"Jack and Jill" show and hopes to have it 
rumung smoothly within a fortnight, when 
he 'will set sail for London to line up 
novdties for the new edition of the Green- 
wich Village show. 

"PEPPER BOX REVUE" SCORES 

San Francisco, April 23.-^The latest 
production, by Ackerman & Hari-is "The 
Pepper Box Revue" was presented Satur- 
day night, April 14, at the Century The- 
atre to a big enthusiastic audience, and 
judging from the frequent applause and 
the laughter was voted a success, . and 
equal it not better than the recent otfer- 
ing of "Struttin' Along." 

Sophie Tucker, who is headlined and 
featured, recdved an ovation equal to any 
Grand Opera prima donna and deservedly 
so, for she more than pleased and enter- 
tained 'with her specialties, and found it 
difficult to retire, only after promising to 
appear later on the program. 

George LeMaire, William LeMaire, Joe 
,< Phillips, Irma Merle and Jack MoxhA-, 
Connor Twins, W. C Hayes, Messrs. Dun- 
phy, Blake, Cunningham and Thomas, the 
quartette, all appearing as prindpals were 
recdved with much favor, and will become 
favorites. The production was staged by 
Fanchon & Marco, Book by George Le- 
Maire and the Music and Lyrics are by 
Fanchon & Marco. The set representing 
the Rose Garden and The Ritz Roof scene 
'was espedally beaUtifuL The full stage 
numbers induded "The Bill Posters"— 
"The Shoe Shop'— "The Rose Garden"— 
"At the Dentist's"- "A Minstrel Satire"— 
"Salon Des Chapeaux"— "Shooting Gal- 
lery"— "The Powder Puff Girls"— '^At the 
Ritz Roof." Gilbert Green is the musical 
director. Will T. Goodman, stage manager 
and Harry A. Bailey, business manager. 

EQUITY MEETING ON JUNE 4 

The annual meeting of the Actors' 
Equity Assodation will be held at the 
Hotd Astor on Monday, June 4. It is ex- 
pected that the possibilities of an extension 
of the current agreement between the 
Equity and the Producing Managers' As- 
sodation, regarding Equity Shop, will be 
the important topic of discussion. 

NEW PLAY FOR SCANLON 

Arrangements were conduded last week 
'whereby Rida Johnson Young, will write 
a new romantic comedy, with music, to 
serve as a starring vehicle , for W'alter 
Scanlon, the Irish 'tenor. If completed in 
time the show will have an early Suolmel- 
shonring out of town and will come to 
Broadway in the Autumn. 



S>HIfr-FOR CHICAGO SHOWS 

Chicago, April 21. — An lususual situa- 
tion faces three productions now playing 
here. Three shows are moving, but all 
three will remain in Chicago. 

"Blossom Time" which has been occupy- 
ing the Apollo will move over to the Great 
Northern to make way for '"The Passing 
Show" which opens there tomorrow ni^t. 
"Light Wines and Beer" will leave the 
Woods and go over to the Selwyn and 
Olga Petrova who is playing in her own 
production, "Hurricane," must vacate the 
Selwyn ,and will take possession of the 
Olympic which has been dark the past 
wedc 

All shows here are doing little business 
compared with this time last season. Wil- 
liam Hodge in "For All of Us" who has 
been enjoying a successful season of 
twenty-two weeks at the Studebaker is 
going along nicely, but may leave here on 
May 12, to allow "Lady Butterfiy" to 
come into this house on Mayl3. "Lady 
Butterfly" is a musical version of "Some- 
body's Luggage." "Cat and The Canary" 
at the LaSalle has- just passed its 300th 
performance in Chicago which is the rec- 
ord for this season. 

Frank Keenan in "Peter Weston" is 
still doing' the best business of any play 
in town at the Harris, .:although recdpts 
■ at this' house could be better ; "Up 'Sie 
Ladder" . which is now playing at the 
Schubert Central is holding its own in 
this small house; "Loyalties" is still do- 
ing good business at Powers but must 
leave here in two weeks. George White's 
"Scandak" doses tonight at the IlUn'ois 
and this new house will remain 'darlc for 
the present. There is a possibility of 
booking GrifiSth's picture "The -White 
Rose" in this theatre provided it can be 
ready in time. This is not definite' but ne- 
gotiations are on. This will make the sec- 
ond time this season the Illinois has 
played a picture. Griffith's "One Wonder- 
ful Night" was the previous offering of 
the silent drama. 

"Two Fellows and a Girl" is doing 
fairly well at Cohan's Grand ;. "Peter and 
Paula" is doing nicely at the. Plaj^house; 
"Bristol Glass" remains at the Blackstone. 

The public has been curious about R. 
U. R. whidi. opened last week at thcrCort 
Good billboard advertising is doing a lot 
toward putting this play over here.; "Tan- 
gerine" looks like it will remain here' for 
the summer at the Garrick; Eugene O'- 
Brien in a new play "Steve" is attracting 
attention at the Princess and "Sally" will 
remain at the Colonial tmtil May 12 ac- 
cording to present plans of Mr. Ziegfeld. 
Woods theatre will offer a picture "The 
Covered Wagon" beginning tomorrow. 
The Moscow Art Theatre leaves here to- 
night after a most successful engagement 
at .the Great Northern. 



NEW THEATRE FOR GREAT NECK 

The Great Neck Theatre, a 1,200 seat 
theatre which Al. E. Aarons, general man- 
ager of the Klaw and Erlanger enterprises 
and George Duck, a motion picture the- 
atre manager of Great Neck are building 
-will be ready to open late in June. Aarons 
intends using this house as a showing 
house of legitimate attractions prior to 
their being passed upon for a New York 
presentation- It is said, all attractions 
seeking bookings through the K- and 
offices will have their im'tial showings at 
the Great Neck house. The theatre is 
only fourteen miles from Times Square 
and can be reached by train in 26 minutes. 

"CHIVALRY" OPENING POSTPONED 

Joseph E. Shea has set back the opening 
of "Chivalry." a play by Wm. Hurlbut at 
the Apollo Theatre, Atlantic City from 
May 7 to May 28. The company headed 
byr Irene Fenwick and Richard Bennett 
will begin rehearsals next Monday. The 
play will be kept out for two weeks and 
then will be taken off until August when 
.Shea will present it in a New York 
theatre. 



ANDREWS TO DO FOREIGN SHOW 

Lyie Andrews will next season present 
a fordgn musical piece called "The Danc- 
ing Dutchess." Charles Purcell will sing 
the leading role. 



April 25, 1923 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



5 



GALLAGHER & SHEAN MUST STAY 
WITH "F OLLIES" SA YS ZIEGFELD 

Act Miut Stay Until the Show Qoaes, Declares Producer, Who 
States That He Will Spend Every Dollar He Owns to Ptevent 
Them Playing for Anyone Else — ^E^uity Says Ziegfeld 
and DiDingham, Who Are Business Associates, 
Should Settle Matter Among Themselves 



Florenz ZtegfeM, Jr., is determined to 
have Gallagher and Shean remain with 
the "Ziegfeld FoUies" during the lifetime 
of the attraction and if necessary will 
spend every dollar he has to prevent them 
playing with anyone else. Mr. Ziegfeld 
made this statement on Monday and seemed 
greatly incensed at the announcement that 
the two comedians would endeavor to clear 
their skirts of the "Follies" contract on 
June 1st and begin rehearsals with George 
White's new show in which they were en- 
gaged to be starred this stunmer. 

Ziegfeld was so emphatic in explaining 
his stand in the matter that he said "There 
is going to {>e a fight and a good one, 
over this matter and if the Actor's Equity 
Association wants to come in on it, I'll 
fight them again, too." 

Continuing he said, "It is just a desire 
on their part to get money and get it in 
a hurry. I am paying them $1,500 a week 
while White will give them $2,000 a week ' 
and they want to get out and grab it quick. 
My contract with them is plain enough. 
It is in the form of a letter written by 
me, with their acceptance at the bottom 
of the letter, executed in duplicate and 
reading 'For the run of the "Ziegfeld 
Follies" ' of 1922. The letter then says 'In 
all other respects to be governed by the 
rules and regulations of the Actors' Equity 
Association run of the play contract, ex- 
cept where otherwise specified. But this 
one is otherwise specified.' . 

"You will note that after expressly 
stating that the engagement was for the 
run of the 'Ziegfeld Follies of 1922', the 
word 'other' was used to apply to the con- 
ditions of the Equity contract The Equity 
contract printed form specifies that for 
ordinary productions the season of a play 
is supposed to terminate on the first of 
June. If Messrs. Gallagher and Shean 
had secured that kind of a contract, possi- 
.bly they might have some basis for their 
withdrawal, but they expressly stipulated 
at the time that the contract read, 'for the 
run of Ziegfeld Follies of 1922' and the 
Equity' contract was adopted ^vith the pro- . 



vision that in all 'otiier' respects it would 
apply. 

"The Ziegfeld Follies of 1922 is stiU 
running at the New Amsterdam theatre, 
will celebrate a full year run on June 5th 
and will continue to run into the hot 
weather with Gallagher and Shean as 
members of its cast." 

Mr. Ziegfeld said that he believed that 
the Equity would compel Gallagher and 
Shean to keep their contracts with him 
and continue with the "Follies" until the 
current production goes to the storehouse, 
which will be at the end of next season as 
the company will go on tour at the gnd of 
its New York engagement. Contmuing, 
he said, "and I will look to see Equity 
have George White, who is t»cked by 
Charles B. Dillingham, postpone the. star- 
ring of the two men until they have ful- 
filled their contract with me." 

Ziegfeld had filed a copy of his contract 
with Gallagher and Shean with the Pro- 
ducing Managers Association and has re- 
quested that organization to take the mat- 
ter up with the Actors' Equity Associa- 
tion through ofGcial channels. 

Last week the two comedians called up- 
on George H. Nicolai, secretary of the P.. 
M. A., and asked him for a ruling on the 
contract. Mr. Nicolai informed them in 
an official capacity that Ziegfeld could 
hold them to fullfill their obligation to 
him.' 

At the Equity headquarters it was stated 
on Monday that the matter had not been 
brought to the attention of the organiza- 
tion through ofiScial channels, but that 
when it was it would have to take its 
regular course in arbitration at confer- 
ences which are held hi-weekly between 
Equity and Managers' committees. 

The Equity people declared that they 
could see no reason why the matter should 
be brought to that organization for Zieg- 
feld and Dillingham were business asso- 
ciates and therefore could settle the matter 
without involving the Actors' association 
and Managers' association in a lengthy and 
unnecessary controversy. 



PHLA. SHOWS HOLD UP WELL 

Phuadelfbia, April - 23.— The mncfa 
heralded appearance of the Moscow Art 
Theatre Company, attracted a large and 
fashionable audience to the Lyric Theatre 
tonight Tolstoy's spectacular historical 
drama, "Tsar Fydor Ivanovitch" provided 
a more than adequate opening bill and was 
warmly received by those present 

The coming of th^ Russian Players will 
undoubtedly be responsible for renewed 
activity among the theatregoers here. At 
any rate their appearance will create a 
stimulus for theatrical entertainment, which 
has been more or less dormant since the 
Lenten season, with a promise of all shows 
prospering from the incident 

The fourth edition of "Greenwidi Vil- 
lage Follies." at the Shubert. served to 
liven np things last week and bids fair to 
have a record breaking run here. Both 
press and public are unanimons in their 
plaudits of the produodon, generally agree- 
ing that it is toe best show of the series. 

"The Changelings," with its all star 
cast headed by Henry Miller and Blanche 
Bates, continues to pack them in at (he 
Broad and will undoubtedly remain tmtil it 
has worn out its welcome: 

"Blossom Time," which registered a rec- 
ord of twenty-seven weeks at the Lyric, 
has mov^ over to thje° Adelphi for a con- 
tinued run, while Fiske O'Hara in "Land 
O'Romance" will depart from the Walnut 
to make way for "Keoipy." 

"Spice of^ 1922," which is rounding out 
its third week at the Chestnut will with- 
draw this week to permit Eddie Cantor in 
"Make It Snappy" to settle down at that 
house for a limited engagement 

I'Captain Aplejack" will remain for two 
more weeks at the Gairrick, where it has 
been doing excellent business. Nothing 
has thus far been booked to follow it here. 



EQUITY SUES FRISCO MANAGER 

San Francisco, April 23. — Nat Gold- 
Stein, theatrical producer, has been made 
defendant in a suit for $3,519 filed in the 
Superior Court last week by Theodore 
Hale, acting as attorney for the Actors' 
Eqnity Association. The amount involved 
dates back to last season when Goldstein 
took over the production of the musical 
play, "Angel Face." Goldstein kept the 
piece going for thirty weeks and is said 
to have dropped over $90,000 before throw- 
ing up the sponge. 'When the piece closed 
in Philadelphia last season he owed $6,000 
in back salaries. Through an amicable ar- 
rangement ^vith Equity he gave promisory 
notes for the amount due and has since 
satisfied more than $2,500 of the claims. 
The remaining note was to have been 
taken up last June. This is the sum in- 
volved in the present suit 

Since his ill-fated experiences with 
".^ngel Face," Goldstein took another 
plunge into theatricals this season with an- 
other musical piece, "Oh Look," which 
toured the west with Harry Fox as its 
star. Goldstein is said to have dropped a 
considerable sum on this production. It is 
said that he owes several of that company 
salaries and has given them individual 
notes for the amounts involved. None of 
the latter have placed any claims with 
Equity and it is generally conceded that 
they are satisfied that Goldstein will make 
good his obligations just as soon as he can 
get hold of the money. 

Goldstein is said to be in New York. 



"SALLY" RETURNING TO N. Y. 

Chicago. April 21. — When Florenz 
Ziegfeld. walked into die Colonial theater 
where "Sally" is playing and saw the house 
about half full he decided to bring its 
Chicago engagement to a close earlier 
than at first planned. "Sally" will leave 
here May 12 returning to New York, 
where, Mr. Ziegfeld believes, there are 
many who will give it good patronage. 
Ziegfeld arrived here the first part of the 
week to visit his family and at the same 
time look over the production which has 
been playing here fifteen weeks. The scale 
of $4.40 top has been maintained through- 
out the run but recently the demand has 
lessened until good seats could be procured 
during the week nights without much 
trouble. With the approach of warm 
weather "Sally," like all other shows in 
town has felt the effect. 



"GOOD MORNING DEARIE" CLOSES 

"Good Morning Dearie," the Charles 
Dillingham musical show which has en- 
joyed a run of eighty consecutive weeks, 
closed at Rochester on Saturday night. 
The piece has been one of the biggest 
money makers ever sent out by Dillingham. 

SELWYN SHOW FOR LONDON 

Archie Selwyn is making arrangements 
in London for the presentation there of his 
brother Edgar's play "Anything Might 
Happen," which recently closed at the 
Comedy Theatre, this summer. 



REEVES STORY DRAMATIZED 

"Craig Kemedy," a dranatizatioo of 
Arthur Reeves' detective stories by Charles 
W. Goddard and William Pinkhain, has 
been accepted for prodootion next season 
by George Lederer. . From all atKonnts 
Lederer.is planning to be unusually active 
' next season inasmuch as he has already 
contracted to do a revised edition of 
"Peaches" and another musical play, "Snz- 
ette." 




"THE BRIDE" A MYSTERY IHRlLLOt 

Toledo, April 23. — ^Violet Heming opened 
last Monday at the Toledo Theatre in a 
new mystery play, "The BrMe," by Grant 
Morris. A creditable performance was 
given' by Miss Heming and the stock eom- 
pany, and after the necessary fixing here 
and there of the play, it is expected to 
come to New York for a run in the near 
future. 

The play opens when a beautiful young 
bride suddenly 'appears in the drawing 
room of two bachelors. She calmly tells 
the staid baclielors that she arrived through 
the trap door. This begins an interestiDK 
series of possibilities to which are added 
front page stories in the day's pweia. 

Just Yiby the bride came to the_ badb- 
elors" apartment is a matter of conjecture 
and further mystery envelops the play. 
Miss HeiBuig appears at hex best 'when 
she works her way into the hearts and 
good graces of the couple into whose house 
she has intruded, and, of coursie, one of 
the bachelors suocumhs completely to her 
.charms. In time the- denouement clean 
up the mystery, and the identity of the 
thief who robbed the safe in the wall is 
also disclosed as a surprise.- ' ' 

Miss Heming -was sJways equal to the 
role and gave a .charming performance. 
James Crane, who is in the comjtany tem- 
(lorarily, had less time than the others in 
which to learn his lines, and was somewhat 
uncertain, about them. Nevertheless, he 
made an' excellent Irading man. Jama A. 
.Bliss, as the elder of the two bachelors, 
did well as a character man. and made the 
most of the part. Benlah Bondy was well 
received as usual, and had the part of amt 
to the two old bachelors. 

Others ia the cast did well, inrlnding 
Irving Mitchdl, who did the part of the 
policeman, and Neil Phatt handled the im- 
portant butler role with ease. 

The principal criticism of die vehicle 
which may serve Miss Heming for a 
Broadway run is that the play lacks a 
definite punch in .the spots that it is- ex- 
pected and needed for an actress like Miss 
Heming. For she b of the type that needs 
life and action at the climaxes. Not only 
the action of the play has its faults, but 
some of the lines could stand some fixing 
.also! . 



NEW DRINKWATER PLAY COMING 

William Harris, Jr.. has secured ■ for 
production during the coming fall, a- new 
play called "Robert E. Lee." written by 
John Drinkwater, the English playwright 
who wrote ''Abraham Lincoln." -Mr. 
Drinkwater is scheduled to come to 
America to aid in the staging of the play. 



ARTHUR HALL 

Arthur Hall, the man whose voice is heard and 
welcomed in millions of American homes. For 
the past few years .Arthur has been mmVi^f 
records for Victor, Columbia, Aeolian, Gesmctt 
and Banner phr nopraph companies. 



DIXON CREDTTORS TO MEET 

A meeting of the creditors of Heniy P. 
Dixon, bankrupt' Unit Show producer and 
former burlesque manager and show own- 
er, will hi: held at the office of Henir K. 
Davb, referee, at his office. No. 140 Nas- 
sau street, on April 30, 1922, at lOJO 
A. M. 

Dixon filed hu banknipt<7 petition oo 
April 17. whkh showed liabilibes of $21,- 
312, assets imknowii, coiisistiDg of six 
shares of' stock of the American Bnrlesqoe 
Association. 

Among the creditors are E. Thomas 
Beatty, ^,000; Mrs. Henry P. Dixon, 
$2,500: Fred Kate, $2J0O; J. Herbert 
Mack, $1,500; PhU. H. Dalton; $2,150. 

Dixon gives his business as that of a 
"theatrical pnodncer" and his home address 
as 528 West 111th street. New York; and 
his business as 701 Seventh a-yenue. 

Dixon's revue on the circuit was called 
"Midnight Revels" and was known as one 
of the better of the many units. 

HALF SALARIES FOR ItEHEARSAL 

The innovation of paying half' salaries 
for the entire rehearsal period is about to 
be experimented with by Harry Walker, 
head of the Harry Walker Booking Office, 
who is assembling two revues for a tour 
of the M. L. Kelly chain of cabarets in 
Panama. 

Walker, who was a former perfonoer, 
knows the hardships to which, chorister 
are subjected and since this season has not 
been such a promising one for the pranc- 
ing girlies he believes that producers 
should lighten their burdens whenever 
possible, providing such a course is ap- 
preciated. 

Mrs. Kelly, who heads the Panama 
amusement entvprise which bears her 
name is tboroagfaly in accord with 
Walker's views and has insisted upon bear- 
ing half the expense of the experiment 

The revues now being assembled will 
be routed for a season of twenty weeks. 



=6 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 25, 1923 



FAMOUS PLAYERS STOCK DROPS AT 
START O F GOVT. CA SE HEARING 

Federal Trade CommiMion Starts Takmg Evidmce in Govern- 
ment Charges That Famous Players^Lasky Cwp. EmfJoys 
Unfair Cmnpetitive Methods and Stock I)rops — 
Orpheum in &nall Gain 



An otherwise colorless market, was fea- 
tured this past week by the sadden decline 
of the Famous Playets-Laslcy stock 2}4 
points with a further loss of of a point 
~a Monday of this week. ' The action of 
the' fssoe when became understandable 
when the Federal Trade Commission is- 
satd, late in the wedc, its amended com- 
iriaint seeking to have the company and six 
of its afiSliated companies cst^idied as a 
movie trust. The Famoos Players cor- 
potatioD has issaed a catCKorical denial to 
all the allesations, bnt nevertheless this 
action was bound to be reflected in the 
price of the issoe. 

The Federal Trade Commission, in its 
comidaint, charges the (Famous Plajrers- 
'Lasky Company and-aix of its associates 
with acting in restraint of trade. The 
hearing was begun on Monday morning in 
the- offices of the oommissioa. 29 West 
Ttrirty-nintb s tre e t, and it is possible that 
the testimony during the next few days 
will, to a large extent, govern the price 
of the stock. 

When this suit by the Federal Trade 
Commission is taken into consideration it 
is easy to see why Famous Flayers dropped, 
in a comparatively short time, from aromd 
97 to its present mark' of 85^. Althoufifa 
various other causes were asffibed for its 
peculiar action it was this impending 'gov- 
ernment actkn that acted as a check on 
the price of the stock. Even though the 
price has declined sales have been few, 
-mostly because control is held by several 
large interests who refuse to be alarmed 



and because those who have smaller hold- 
ings, having bought at a price considerably 
above the present quotation, refuse to be 
shaken ouL During the week the stock 
'slid from 88^ to 86yi, at which point it 
closed on Saturday for a loss of 2}4 points. 
On Monday of this week 4,40(X shares were 
'sold, the stock declining to 85^, a further 
' loss of ^ of a poinL Should ue testimony 
before the commission be very adverse it 
would not be' at all surprising if the issue 
hung up a new low. 

Goldwyn, with 13,700 shares moving, just 
about held its own, hovering around Ifae 6 
mark all week. Opening on Moods^ a 
week ago at 6y6 it varied dnring the week' 
from 6yi to S}i and closed at 6 for a loss 
of Mi- On Monday of this week it held 
firm at that point with 600 shares sold. 

Loew failed to react to any appreciable 
extent, opening the week at 19 and closing 
at' 18^ for a loss of H, and holding at 
18^ on Monday of this week with 600 
'sh ares traded. The possibility that I^w 
is going through k shaking-ont process 
might account for its price, ahhougfli any- 
' thing within yi point of 19, either way, has 
been considered normal for this issue. 

Orpfaetnn was the only amusement stock 
on the big exchange last week to show a 
gain, the price going from 195^ on Monday 
a week ago to 19^ on Saturday with 4,300 
shares sold, a axgei ntmiber than usual 
This gain of ^ a point was not held on 
Monday of this week when the stock, with 
700 shares soM, Hrent from 19^ to 19^ 
for a % loss. 



"WHY NOT' FOR CHECAGO 

Robert McNabb and George Atkinson 
have takea ova the nanagement of "Why 
Not," the play by Jesse Lynch Williams, 
whkh was originally presented and spon- 
sored the Eqnity Pl^rCTS, at the Eitiuity- 
Fotty-Eigfatfa Street lleatre, from Louts 
O. Madooa and will present it at Powers 
Theatre, Chicago on April 30. The Equity 
people win oo-operate with the new pro- 
ducers in the preseatotioa «f the play in 
the Windy Gty and are to receive a n^yal- 
ty for the use of the name. Four new 
lunub e is have been added to the cast 
wfaicfa originally presented the play, they 
arc; Ernest (Hendoming, Margaret Mooen, 
Estelle Winwood and Catherine Roberts. 
TlMBnos Londen. Norma MitrhHl, Hay-' 
mood Gnioa and John Cromwell are the 
■imiiiImh t of the original cast which played 
at the National Theatre to remain with the 
attractioa. 

TREASURERS' SHOW ON SUNDAY 

The Thirty-fourth annual show of the 
Treasurers' Club of America -will be 
given oo Sunday evening April 29th, in 
the form of a benefit performance for the 
sick and burial fund of the club at the 
Hudson Tbeat/e. Many members who are 
fa the organization since it started will 
be present Sunday night. 

A list of stars who will appear at the 
show is being prepared by thie club com- 
mittee in charge of the oenefit perform- 
ance and it will be announced sometime 
this week. The club was formed 34 jrears 
ago 'with twenty members. At that time 
the leading theatres werie Wallack's, 
Daly's and the Bijou. 

"LADY BUTTERFLY*^ DOING BIG 

"Lady Butterfly." the Morosco Golding 
001011311/3 musial conedf' whtdb has been 
doing a capacity business fhion^ the sale 
6f "two for one" and cnt^te tickets, will 
conclude its engagement af the Astor The- 
atre on May 12. . The . Shnberts then will 
place either "Bal Tabarfn" or the new Jim 
Bartoa .show m the house for a Smmner 
engagement. 



"CABETTE" SHORT. CLOSES 

"Gabettc," the musical play sponsored by 
the Community Players, Incl, whidi closed 
after having been out two wedcs. is said 
to have been hauled in because of lack of 
capital. Several members of the cast and 
the stage crew have filed claims against 
George Byron Totten, who as head of the 
Community Players, promoted the produc- 
tion. 

Totten's difficulties with the piece date 
back to its early rehearsal period, when 
Equity stepped in and insisted upon him 
posting a bond before allowing the re- 
hears^ to continue. Totten posted the 
required amount in cash and the rdearsals 
continued. The piece opened in Altentown, 
Pa., and while more or less enthusiastically 
received did not accomplish any' phenom- 
enal takings. Totten is said to have as- 
send>lcd the company together and pre- 
vailed upon them to write their organiza- 
tion, meaning- the Equity, to permit Totten 
to use the money he had posted as a bond, 
so that the show could continue. 

At first Equity wired the company 
deputy that th^ oould not allow Totten 
to use the mooe^ he had posted with them, 
but after a series of loog distance phone 
calls, the money was forwarded. When 
die show stopped in Scranton the follow- 
ing wedc its earnings were just about 
sufficient to bring the company back, with-, 
out payiiig salaries to either the cast <k-' 
stage crew. 

Equity has taken the stand that since 
the meim>ers of the company took matters 
in their own hands and continned witii the 
piece against their admonitionSj^that the 
Association can hardly bc^expectcd to 
collect die money dne. - 

Totten is said to be scurrying around 
attempting to interest capital to finanrr 
the piece for a metropolitan presentatioa. 
However, he will have Equi^ to reclcou 
with before he can proceed further with 
the piece. At present his name adorns the 
Equity black-list, all of which means that 
members of tiie or^nization will not be 
permitted to appear in any of his produc- 
tions until he has adjusted the outstand- 
ing claims. 



SEE END OF CHICAGO ORCHESTRA 

Chicago, April 21. — Because of the 
musicians' union demands it looks like the 
end of the Chicago SymplvMiy Orchestra. 
For the past few weeks there were ru- 
mors that all was not well between the 
Musicians' Union and the Orchestral As- 
sociation of Chicago. Last night matters 
came to a head. Whether it is to oeprate 
on a two-thirds basis, or whether there 
be no orchestra at all for next season will 
soon be decided. 

The musicians' union served a demand 
on the Orchestral Association for a 25 
per cent increase or $15. a week for next 
season. The Orchestral Association an- 
swered that last season it suffered a de- 
ficit of $70,000 and feels unable to increase 
its burden. 

When the Chicago Symphony finishes 
its season tonight it will be technically dis- 
banded. There have been no contracts 
signed with any members for next season, 
which is unusual. A notice which is be- 
ing salt out to subscribers reads that re- 
newals will be accepted only on the condi- 
tion of there being another season. 

In a statement by the Orchestral Asso- 
ciation it tells that on March 21 of this 
year a delegation from the Musician's 
union headed by President Petrillo pre- 
sente4 and discussed a demand^that a mini- 
mum salary for members of the orchestra 
be increased from $60 to $75., which, 
since a number of the players receive 
more than the minimum scale, would mean 
an increase of like amount throughout the 
orchestra. .After a full explanation of the 
situation the delegation was told it was 
impossible to meet the demand in full or 
even in part. On the following Saturday 
(March 24) the union served notice that 
no member of the orchestra should enter 
into a contract for the season of 1923-24 
until the matter had been settled. 

Horace Oakley, one of the 'Vice -presi- 
dents of the Orchestral Association stated 
that in the year 1921-22 the orchestra ran 
behind some $30,000 after using the net 
earnings of the hall and'buikling of about 
$40,000 or about $70,000 total. In order to 
meet diis deficit securities from the en- 
dowment were sold. This season the 
price of tickets was increased to the ex- 
tent of $16,000 and office rents in the build- 
ing were raised about $5,000. With en- 
dowment funds now available, this year's 
-deficit will be met. 

The present union scale -for orchestral 
players in Chicago is the best in 
the country, a minimum , of $60. for four 
concerts a week and four rehearsals of 
nine hours for twenty eight weeks. There 
are such additional benefits, and old age 
pensions, for none of which are the mem- 
bers of the orchestra assessed one cent. 

Mr. Oakley declares that three courses 
are open. The orchestra may accept Hit 
old scale; the orchestra may next year 
number sixty-five players instead of the 
present ninety-two; the orchestra may be 
entirely disbanded. 

The Chicago symphony orchestra was 
organized in 1891 and this is the first time 
in tiie thirty-two years that the association 
and the players have coine to' an open con- 
flict. Heretofore all salary adjustments 
have been made peacably and equitable. 



"XYPALANTr FOR CARROLL 

Henry Baron's aidaptation from a French 
farce, ''My Aunt From Xypalanti," wilt 
be presented at the Earl C^xroll Theatre 
next Monday night It was intended to 
try the show out, opening at Wilmington 
last Monday night, but the preliminary tour 
was cancelled with the producers deciding 
to try it out in New 'York. The attraction 
is iplaying on a straight percentage con- 
tract without any minimum guarantee to 
the theatre. 



"ADRIENNE" COMING IN 

"Adrienne," Ixuis Werba's new musical 
production which is scheduled to open at 
the Garrick Theatre, Philadelphia, on May 
14 and remain on the road until the latter 
part of June is slated to be brought into 
either the New Amsterdam or the Globe 
Theatre. It will be given the preference 
at the New Amsterdam should the "Follies" 
vacate, otherwise it will follow "Jack and 
Jiir at the Globe. 



MILEAGE BOOK PLAN HALTED 

Boston, Mass., April 23. — ^After a hear- 
ing on a petition of fifty Eastern railroads 
opposed to the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission ruling. Judges Mack, Brewster 
and Morris in the United States District 
Court issued a pennanent injunction re- 
straining the commission from carrying 
out its recent order providing for the sale 
of non^tiansferable and intetchaiigeable 
mileage tickets at a 20 per cent price re- 
duction. 

The suit was brought to annul the In- 
terstate Commerce Commission order of 
March 6, 1923, requiring the railroads to 
issue at, a price of $72 tickets calling for 
2,500 miles of carriage in denominations 
of $90. Although the case was brought 
before the court on a petition for a tem- 
porary injimction it was agreed during 
the argument that the hearing be consid- 
ered finaL 

Under the terms of the commission or- 
der against which the injimction was 
issued, practically all of the large railroads 
in the United States wefe to place on sale 
on May 15, mileage tickets good for 2,500 
miles at a 20 per cent rductioiL The 
Boston court order is likely to restrain 
the sale of tickets on that date all orver the 
country, although the terms of the order 
as conveyed to the commission only affects 
the eastern railroads which fought the 
commission's policy in the court Some 
action is expected now by other railroads 
in the South and West since they have 
a prccendent established to guide them. 

Word has come from Interstate Com- 
merce Commission officials in 'Washington 
that the Federal Court order here would 
probably be appealed at once to the Su- 
preme Court for a final decision. The 
opinion of the Federal Court in Boston 
follows : 

"It is clear from the record," the opin- 
ion states, "that the commission proceeded 
on the assumption that the spirit and 
theory of the congressional amendment 
(approved August 18, I9ZZ,) required 
them to order the scrip coupons to be 
issued at reduced rates, at least in so far 
as such rates could not be deemed con- 
fiscatory. . . . 

"In our judgment the amendment is 
not mandatory. It does not prescribe that 
such coupons shall be issued at a reduced 
rate. Attempts to fix specific reduced 
rates by legislation were defeated. 

"The amendment itself is attacked as 
unconstitutional in that in requiring the 
interchangeable scrip coupons it compels 
an interchange of credit between the rail- 
roads and thereby compels a service at the 
risk, of complete financial loss in case of 
the, insolvency of the road from which the 
scrip may have been purchased. 

"As the commission points out, the rail- 
roads themselves have maintained the in- 
terchangeable scrip coupons established 
imder govenunent operation, and have 
thus voltmtarily established a similar in- 
terchange of credits over alt roads except 
electric and short line carriers. Under the 
present amendment, the extent of such 
credit interchange is left to the commis- 
sion, and must, of course, be reasonable; 
but in requiring the interchange in respect 
to the script coupons, the action of Con- 
gress must be upheld as a constitutional 
exercise of power within the aforesaid 
decisions. 

"A pennanent injunction will therefore 
be granted against the order of the com- 
mission." 



TWO NEW McGUlRE PLAYS 

William Anthony McGuire and Gordon 
Morris have collaborated on two new 
plays, "Jack in the Pulpit" and "The Devil 
and Mary." One of the plays wilt be done 
in the autumn by Sam Harris. 



THEATRE WAGE INCREASE 

(Continued from page 3) 

purpose of arranging a new wage scale, 
which it is said will call for an average 
of fifteen per cent increase. The Motion 
picture operators who have a separate 
local, wilt do likewise early in May and 
draft a scale which will call for an aver- 
age of twenty per cent increase in wages. 

Just how the managers will receive the 
demands of the numerous unions cannot 
at this time be learned. 



April 25, 1923 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



7^ 



MATINEE SHOWINGS ON BROADWAY 
REPLACE OUT OF TOW N BREAK-IN 

New Idea Introduced by A. H. Wood* with "Morphia," Has 
Encouraged Others to Follow Suit — Far Leas Expensive 
Than Out-of-Town ISiowings wiiich Generally Lose 



A number of managers are utilizlns the 
special madnee idea for preliminary show- 
ings of plays that have a doubtful aspect. 
This idea has grown from a spasmodic 
stage into a cut and dried business propMi- 
tion and is found to be far less expensive 
than the usual ont-of-town '^reak-in" 
showings; which more often than not are 
a loser and bring the production into town 
heavily burdened by a loss of several thou- 
sand dollars. If it gets across all is well, 
but' if there should be a drain on the re- 
serve, it often forces a piece to the store- 
house before it has been given a fair 
chance to get going. 

' A. H. Woods is credited with being the 

£ioneer in this new angle on show busuiess, 
aving experimented with "Mori^" in a 
' series of special matinees at the Eltinge 
and finding the public response sufficient to 
warrant his putting it in for a night bilL 
Since Woods turned the trick successfully 
several other producers have followed his 
lead. 

The most recent case is that of "Uptown 
West," which was brought out at matinees 
at the Earl Carroll Theatre and which 
since has been shifted into the Bijou as a 
night bill. 

Richard Hemdon, who directs the des- 
tinies of the Belmont Theatre Company, 
and who has made several attempts to es- 
tablish a French Theatre in Npw York, has 
long since harbored an idea to bring out 
several pieces in the original foreign 
tongue. He has hesitated in investing an 
enormous production expenditure to test 
his judgment in the matter, but now h^ 
decided upon a series of special matinees 
of these pieces at the Beknont Theatre. 
He will offer several of than with im- 
provised scenic equipment and if any 
should catch on he will build special pro- 
duaions for them. 

The_Meltx>umc Arden Productions is an- 



other firm who will utilize the special 
matinee idea to test the drawing power of 
a play called "Greater Than Law," which 
is an adaptation of Han Allins famous 
Swedish plajr, "A Mother," which ran for 
three' years m Sweden and which has been 
adapted for the American stage by Arvid 
Paulson, who will also create one of the 
principal roles in the piece. 

The matinee "try-out" idea has been 
hailed with open arms by the newer ele- 
ment of producers, whose limited capital 
makes them necessarily frugal. At least 
a dozen have plays in which they have 
great faith, but nave been wary about tying 
up ten or fifteen thoosand dollars on a 
production, which at best they can only 
look at this Spring and have to put away 
until autumn. 

Also the idea is proving a boon to thea- 
tre owners ia that anything in the way of 
receipts brought in by these special per- 
formances is considered "velvet," The 
regular attraction is contracted into a 
house for eight performances weekly and 
is thus not durupted by the special mati- 
nees, inasmuch as the^ are given on days 
that do not conflict with those of the cur- 
rent attraction. While a few of the thea- 
tre owners have taken a percentage gam- 
ble, most of them are holding out for flat 
rentals, which range from $350 to $400 for 
each eerfoimance. 

Although some of the more seasoned 
producers frown upon this method of 
"showing," arguing that it detracts from 
the regular premiere when it is sent into 
a night bill, there is an equal number for 
it. The latter claim that the matinee audi- 
ences are not as critical as those who at- 
tend the night performances and that if 
there should be a few ragged edges dis- 
cerning at the matinees, two weeks' play- 
ing would iron this out and at the same 
time keep money coming in. 



TICKET OFHCE PLAN READY 

A complete plan for the operation of a 
Central Theatre Ticket Agency at Broad- 
way and Forty-third street, under the di- 
rection of Joe Leblang, will be submitted 
to the members of the Producing Man- 
agers' Association at their annual meeting 
on Friday, May 4. 

The plan was worked out by a special 
committee of which Lee Shubert is chair- 
man and calls for the sale of all choice 
seats at a charge of 10 per cent premium 
to the purchaser. It is constructed in such 
a manner that it will eliminate the sale of 
tickets to and by the so-called "gyp" 
brokers who have been charging from 50 
to 200 per cent premium on the sale of 
tickets. It, however, is said to make pro- 
visions for the apportionment of tidcets 
to the hotel stands and to the ticket agen- 
cies which .have been distributing tickets 
at a fifty cent advance. 

According to the present ideas of the 
committee the office will be established in 
the store now occupied by the Gr^ Drug 
Company, at 1490 Broadway, which is 
above the basement ticket office of the 
Public Service Ticket Office, which is op- 
erated by T jhiang and dispenses tickets at 
cut rate prices. 

It is expected that the matter will be en- 
tirely threshed out at the meeting so that 
arrangements can be made, if it is ap- 
proved, for the opening up of the office on 
Sept 1. 

It is understood that the plan calls for 
the formation of a corporation with stock 
to be hekl by Leblang and members of the 
Producing BAanagers Association and Le- 
blang to receive a salary of $25AX)0 a year 
as supervising director. Tickets are to te 
sold at this oiiicc for all Broadway theatres 
in advance of performances with the. tidc- 
ets being available at the box office only at 
the time of the performance. Besides the 
Central Office the plan calls for the es- 
tablishment of twenty branch offices in 
New York, Brooklyn, Long Island and 
New Jersey. 

STATE TAX ON SHOWS 

A fifteen per cent taxation on the face 
value of the admission ticket is being 
charged for all amusements in the State 
of Connecticut. Ten per cent of the tax is 
required by the Government, with the other 
five going to the State. 



WOODS TO DO FOUR 

According to Al. H. Woods' plans for 
next season four attractions will be pro- 
duced in New York during August and 
September. The first wUl be "Light 
Wines and Beer" which will open at the 
Ehinge Theatre early in August Then 
will come "The Next Comer" a new play 
by Kate Jordan, which will be followed ■ 
early in Septen^r with "Casanova," an 
adaptation of a Spanish play, in which 
Lowell Sherman will be starred under 
the joint management of Woods and Gil- 
bert Miller at the Selwyn Theatre. The 
fourth play, which will open late in Sep- 
tember, will be the latest of the "PoUsh 
and Perlmutter," with Barney Bernard 
and Alex Carr at the Cohan Theatre. 



STOCK IN MICHIGAN THEATRES 

Two Butterfield houses in Michigan 
will go into stock for the summer. The 
Regent, Kalamazoo^ opened on - Sunday of 
this week and wiU play two shows a 
week. The shows will be under the di- 
rection of Hal Mordaunt with Gertrude 
Bondhill as leading woman and James 
Carroll, stage director. 

The Regent, Lansing, will open on May 
20 and others will probably follow. 



BIG ADVANCE FOR ART PLAYERS 

Prior to the arrival of the Moscow Art 
Theatre Players at the Lyric Theatre, 
Philadelphia, for a two weeks' engage- 
ment last Monday an advance sale of 
$60,000 was reported. A $5 top is being 
charged and Morris Gest anticipates 
grossing $90,000 on the engagement 




"GINGHAM GIRL" FOR CENTRAL 

"The ' Gingham Girl," which has been 
running at tiie Earl Carroll Theatre since 
August 2 of last year, will move to the 
Central Theatre next Monday night to re- 
main there over the summer. With the 
moving of the play there will be five of 
the original members of the ast mfs^ing. 

This was all brought about when Schwab 
and Kussell, the producers, early last ireek 
decided that as the show had lost maaef 
the two preceding weeks and they had 
made arrangements to move the show to 
another house^ that they would ask six of 
the principals who had been with the show 
thirty-three weeks to accept a 25 per cent 
cut in salary. The first to be apmacfaed, 
according to Schwab, was Amelia Summer- 
ville. Miss Summerville after thtnUnj tJie 
matter over informed the producera that 
she could not think of acoeptinff any cut 
as she had plenty of picture work to keep 
her busy and that the most dignified thing 
the producers could do would be to dose 
the show. That evening 'Miss Summer- 
ville was tendered her notice. In the mean- 
time iScfawab asserts Rossdl Mack Gn> 
vassed the company and after tltt show 
brought out the notices of Louise Alien, 
Allan Edwards and himself. Hden Ford, 
another principal, tendered her notice as 
she had been engaged to appear in "Hden 
of Troy" at an. increased salary. The 
members of the chorus which hdped to 
make the show the hit it is and persons 
playmg minor roles were not asked to take 
a cut and will remain with the attraction. 

Julia Ral^h will replace Miss .Sommer- 
ville, Midgie Miller will replace Aliss 
Allen, Donald Carroll will take the place 
of Allan Edwards, Rita BeU wiU replace 
Helen Ford and William Frawlcy will re- 
plate Russell Made 

Eddie Buzzell, prindpal comedian of the 
show, is scheduled to leave the attraction 
at the expiration of his contract, June 1. 
The new members of the cast will join the 
show at the Central. 



JUAfOTA HANSEN BANKRUPT 

Jnanita Hansen, fbnner screen actress, 
now in vaudeville^ last wedc filed a petitioa 
in bankruptcy. It shows liabilities of $11,- 
057 and no assets. Tliepcindpal cxeditors 
are: United States, $1,930 for iaoome tax 
1919-20: N. Y. State, $7^ for income taxes 
for 1920; dark Taxicab Co. $2,aD0^tem 
Bros., $1,128; Morning- Tdegiapli, $8D5. 

Miss Hansen, recemly was arrested in 
New York on a charge of having dmgs in 
her possession and shortly afterward broke 
into jprint with a story of the drug habit 
and her efforts to core hersdi 

She is now in vaudeville «loing a mooo- 
logue called "A Page From Life^^ in which 
she tdls of the drug cnrse, of which evi- 
dence offered by hersdf and several physi- 
cians proved she had been cored. 

'When in p i Uuie s she was paid a large 
salary said to have been $2;S0O wcddy. 



'•ELSI^' TO REMAIN 

"Elsie," the musical comedy produced by 
John Jay SchoU, will remain at the Van- 
derbilt Theatre after negotiating to move 
to the Earl Carroll Theatre to replace 
"The Gingham GirL" "Elsie" had Ulcn 
below its stop Umit for two weeks when 
Lyle Andrews gave the attraction notice 
to vacate. After the notice had been given 
Andrews agreed to permit the attraction 
to continue at a guarantee of $3,500 a week 
to the theatre for its share of the gross. 
It is reported that one of the younger Gng- 
genbeims of the copper iuteresls and a 
representative of the Knglish family of 
Rothchilds are financially sponsoring the 
attraction. 



HUlis Bntterfield who closed recently 
with "Johannes Kreisler," has been en- 
g[aged for Lawrence Weber's produc- 
tion, "Fires of Spring." 



VIOLET BARNEY 

"HOME AGAIN" 

BACK FROM A LONG VAUDEVILLE TOUR-GOING INTO STOCK THIS SUMMER 

Thin \Ve*k: Kcith'n RiverniHe, New York 



"THE WASP" MOVING 

"The Wasp," a mystery play by Thomas 
Fallon, author of "The Last Warning," 
will vacate the Morosco Theatre on Sattir- 
day night and. move to the Sdwyn The- 
atre on Monday, where it will rqHace 
"Within Four Walls," Mack HHliard's 
production, w)udi wUl oondnde a two 
weeks' engagement on Saturday. On Wed- 
nesday night of next week Oliver. Morosco 
will present Thoomsoo BndtananTs nnr 
play Pride" at the Morosco for a smnmer 
engagement. % 



8 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 25, 1923 





LEGIT STARS IN 
SUMMER RUSH 
TO VAUDE. 

OPERA AND FILM STARS ALSO BID 



•Vandevflle is due for a greater inflnx 
or artists from motion pictures, mosical 
comedies, the legitimate stage and evoi 
grand opera, this smnmer than ever before 
jodging from the amount of "names" 
which are scheduled to open within the 
next two months, and from the number 
which have already opened. The latst 
five "names" which are now didiering whh 
the Kdth Vandeville Exchange are those 
of James J. Jeflfries, former heavyweigfat 
champion of the world ; Mary Miles l£n- 
ter, William Desmond, Bert Lytell and 
JXm^™ (Dorothy Davenport). 

Mrs. Wallace Reid has already played the 
Orphenm Crcnit this season, bat this was 
several months before her hustand's death. 
It is more tiian 'fifteen years since Jeffries 
appeared in theatricals of any sort He is 
said to be ready for opening during the 
hat week in May. Hany Weber is sub- 
mittmg these five. 

- ^rom musical comedy and the legitimate 
nda the list of newcomers to Keith vande- 
vffle this year is headed by Eddie Cantor, 
whose engagement to open at the Palace, 
uevelaod, oo Tone 4th was exdusivdy 
annomiced in die Qjpfeb several weela 
MO. The rumor that.AI Jolson is also to 
be seen in Kdth vaudeville;, published at 
the same time, still persists and more than 
pnAably will devdop into a fact Others 
mdude Ol^ Cook, who opened last week; 
Harlan Dixon 'and Marie Callahan, - who 
are to open shortly; Eddie Buzzell, Doris 
Rankm. Howard Kyle, Leo CarriUo, Wil- 
liam Faversham, and ' Lon Tellegen, the 
last two playing for some ttmr now. 

Grand opera u represented on the Loew 
Grcnrt by Dorothy Jardon and Orville 
Harrow. Evdyn Seotneyv the Metropol- 
itan Opera Comjony's prima donna, who 
anow in Australia, will arrive here in the 
eonrse of a few weeks to play vaudeville 
m the Middle West Chief Canpolican, 
also from . the Metropolitan Opera Com- 
pany, is now playing vaudeville. Mar- 
gnente Sylva is planning a return to vaude- 
ville this snnimer, having been absent from 
the two-a-day for the past three years. 



LOEW CLUB ELECTS OFFICERS 

The recently organized Loew-Mptro 
OtA, dected its officers for the commg 
year at a meeting hdd last week in the 
Loew Bnilding and resulted in the dec- 
tion of_ CoL Brady as president of the or- 
nnization. David Loew is vice-president. 
Miss Qnimby, 'recording secretary; Mr. 
Quick, treasurer, and' Dave Bloom finan- 
cial secretary. Committees, ranging from 
ececutive, to membership, athletic, sodal, 
publidty, editorial, ajid finandal were ap- 
pointed. Over thr«e[ Hundred employees of 
the loew and Metro'offices have joined the 
dub. It is ananging for a newspaper to 
Ik issued weddy to the members, and is 
also getting up a baseball team. 



BUZZELL HAS ACT 

Eddie Buzzell, who is shortly to retire 
from the cast of "The Ging^m Girl," will 
play several wedcs in vaudeville prior to 
Kligitmmg rehearsals for a new musical 
play in which he is to be starred, entitled 
"Keep Her Smiling." 

FIELDS BOOKED OVER ORPHEUM 

W. C Fidds, who dosed with Geoige 
White's- "Scandals" in Chicago last week, 
has bem rooted over the Orphenm Qr- 
cmt in his comedy sldt; "Golfing." 



N. V. A. COMPLAINTS 

Grace Moratti has complained against 
Ted and Betty Healey, alleging that they 
are infringing on her "mo&er" gag. 

Clayton and Edwards have brought com- 
plaint letters against Jans and Whalen, 
claiming that the latter are infringing on 
several bits in their act, among them the 
piece of business consisting of one in the 
act sitting on a chair with a baby spot- 
L'ght thrown on his fac^ playing the uke 
and singing in a falsetto while the other 
dances. 

Paul Spedit, the orchestra leader, has 
bronght complaint against Dr. Hugo 
Kiesenfdd, who has jnst completed two 
weeks at the Palace with the Rivoli and 
Rialto orchestras, alleging that Riesenfeld 
infringed on several parts of his material 
Specht claims that the idea of interpreting 
a popular American number as played in 
foreign countries is his, and he also states 
that Riesenfeld dnplicated every original 
idea of his vaudeville act, induduig that of 
"Classical Jazz." 

WILCOX WRITES A NOTE 

Frank Wilcox, who does a sketch in 
vaudeville, tried a new way of getting out 
of appearing at Court, when he was handed 
a smmnons for speeding last week on 
Broadway and 184th Street When his 
case was called the next day, a lackey in 
the livery of the Friars Qub, stepped up 
and gave a note to the complaining police- 
man which read : 

"Officer J. H. Smith, My Dear Sir;— 
Endosed is my certificate. Hope this will 
be satisfactory. Will drive more carefully 
from now on. Thank you very much for 
treating' me so decently. Sincerely, Frank 
Wilcox." 

The "certificate" was the summons, and 
the $25 was to pay his fine. The Magis- 
trate was not satisfied and ordered that 
Wilcox appear in person. 



KEITH BUYS NEW FORDHAM SITE 

The B. F. Keith Circuit has purchased 
a new site at Fordhajn Road and Morris 
Avenue, in the Bronx, for which they are 
paying $135,000. This site is within two 
blocks of the present Fordham Theatre, 
which the Keith circuit opened two years 
ago. It has a frontage of 169.9 fr^ on 
Fordham road and 1/3.9 on Morris ave- 
nue. No plans as to what type of theatre 
wOl be erected on the site have been an- 
nounced as yet, and in all probability the 
land will be held for a year or so before 
anything is built on it. 



ORPHEUM ROUTE FOR OLGA COOK 

Olga Cook, who recently closed in 
"Blossom Time" and opened in Keith 
vaudeville last week, has been routed over 
the Orpheum drcuit She will open in 
San Frandsco on April 29th. 

Dolly Kay has also been routed over the 
Orpheum dreuit and began her tour in 
St. Louis on Sunday, April 22nd. 



HARLAN DIXON HAS ACT 

Harlan Dixon, who closed recently with 
"Good Morning Dea^e," will enter Keith 
vaudeville shortly with an act in which he 
will be supported by the Sixteen Sunshine 
Girls from that show, and Marie Callahan 
as his dancing partner. He will open early 
in May. 

INEZ COURTNEY IN VAUDEVILLE 

Inez Courtney is entering vandeville in a 
new act in which she will be supported by 
Stark Patterson and Sid Keyes. The of- 
fering will be presented by Rosalie Stewart 
and is being staged by Bert French. Ar- 
thur Swanstrom and Carey Morgin are 
writing the act. 

LORnTA MeDERMOTT FOR FILMS 

Loretta McDennott, jazz dancer, who 
has been appearing in a production act with 
'Frico in the western vaudeville houses, 
will make her film dd>nt in Jadde Coogan's 
next s cr een feature. 



KEITH DEALING 
WITH SHEA 
FOR HOUSES 

SEEK TO OWN INDEPENDENTS 



Negotiations are now being held between 
the B. F. Kdth Circuit of theatres and 
Mike Shea, for the sale of Shea's Theatres 
in Buffalo and in Toronto, to the Kdth 
drcnit, which has been booking those 
houses for several years. This is regarded 
as the first move towards the buying up 
of all the remaining houses not owned by 
the Keith dreuit and which are being 
booked through the Keith vaudeville ex- 
change. Another house is also reported 
under negotiations for transfer to the own- 
ership of the Kdth circuit, is the Princess 
in Montreal, whidi is owned by the -Cana- 
dian United Theatres, Ltd. 

Except for the F. F. Proctor houses, the 
only other houses booked by the Kdth 
vaudeville exchange which it does not 
control, are the Colonial, in Erie, owned 
by the Presque Isle Amusement Corpora- 
tion and the Hippodrome, 'Youngsto'wn, 
owned by the Youngstown Hippodrome 
Corporation. These are also reported in 
line for ownership by the Kdth firm. 

The Proctor dreuit was recently re- 
ported to have been purchased by J. J. 
Murdock for the B. F. Keith circuit, while 
Mr. Murdock and Mr. Proctor were at 
Palm Beach, Florida last month. This, 
however, was emphatically denied by the 
Proctor officer The meeting between Mr. 
Murdock and Mr. Proctor was simply be- 
cause both happened to go to Palm Beach 
to rest, and was sodal only, as both are 
dear friends. 



CASTING ALHAMBRA PLAYERS 

The cast of the Alhambra Players, which 
is being made up by Clark Brown of the 
Kdth office, consists thus far of William 
Watcrels and Marguerite Knight as the 
leads, with Lorraine Bernard, formerly 
of the Keith Hudson Players in Union 
Hill, and Harry Hayes as seconds. Flora 
Gade, Thomas Gade, Thomas Coffin Cooke, 
Homer Miles and Ralph Sprague have also 
been engaged. 

The stock ^company will open at Kdth's 
' Alhambra theatre on Monday, May 7tb. 
T^'^h'ouse will dose its vaudeville policy 
on May 6th, and go right into the stock 
policy for the summer. 



PERCY WILLIAMS RECUPERATING 

Isup, L. L, April 23.— Percy G. Wil- 
liams is much improved in his condition, 
which resulted from an internal hemor- 
rhage while he was in Florida last week. 
He returned North in a private car, and, 
according to his secretary, Frederick A. 
Rosebush, the former theatre magnate's 
condition was never real serious, although 
there was some alarm over his illness. 



"CONTESTS" ON AGAIN 

Pr<>ctor's Fifth Avenue Theatre has re- 
sumed the "Opportunity Contests" this 
weeJc It is understood that the successful 
contestants will be grouped together in a 
mixed minstrel which will be given at the 
theatre next week. According to present 
plans, professional players will hold down 
the "ends" with the local talent contribut- 
ing singing and dancing specialties. 



THOBIFSON GOING TO ENGLAND 

Dr. Wm. H. Thompson known as 
"Thompson, the Egyptian," will sail for 
England on May 9 to begin an dght-week 
tour of the- Moss Circuit, which was ar- 
ranged for him by William Morris. He 
will begin his season in Nottingham on 
May 16th. 



ACTRESS SLUGGED AND ROBBED 

Zoe Garland, 20 years old, an actress, 
who lives at the Hotel Flanders, 135 
West Fortj'-scventh Street, was found un- 
conscious, with a contusion of the back of 
her head, early Saturday in front of the 
dancing studio of Michel Fokine, 226 
West Seventy-second Street She was 
partly revival by Patrolman Jeremiah 
O'Connor, who .carried her into Fokine's 
studio, where she was attended and taken 
by Dr. Paul to Knickerbocker Hospital. 
The man who had found her and railed 
Patrolman O'Connor gave his name as 
"Daniel Samuels, employe of the Ansonia 
Hotel" The hotd said he was unknown 
there. 

When the young woman regained con- 
sdousness at the hospital she said she had 
been to a party at the West Seventy-sec- 
ond Street address and that while on her 
way to get a taxi, two men and a woman 
approached, one of them remarking, 
"There's some easy jack." The next 
thing she knew she had been knocked un- 
conscious. "Two hundred dollars wluch 
she said, she had on her person was miss- 
ing. 

BIG ACT IN CABARETS 

Chicago, April 21.— The outlying places 
of amusement where dancing and dining 
is the rule arc offering big vaudeville at- 
tractions and these places are drawing 
well. The Marigold Garden where Ernie 
'Young has been giving the North side 
amusement seekers real good entertain- 
ment is now featuring Gertrude Hoffman 
and her big revue. Included in this is De- 
'Haven and Nice. So far she has brokoi 
all records for a consistent draw at this 
place. Ed. Beck's revue is still going big 
at the Rainbo Room. Frances White is 
the headine attraction beginning Monday 
night She will remain there for two 
weeks. It is said that Irene Castle wDl be 
the next offering for the Rainbo Room. 

TO CLOSE "BOHEMIAN NIGHTS" 

The "Bohemian Nights," which are be- 
ing held every Sunday evening at the Na- 
tional Vaudeville Artists club, will be dis- 
continued for the summer, beginning with 
the latter part of May. The dance nights, 
hdd every Thursday and Sunday,- will 
also be discontinued about the same time. 
They will be resumed in October. 

RELIANCE GETS THREE MORE 

The Reliance Agency, which supplies 
vaudeville acts to a number of independent 
houses, have added three more stands to 
thdr books/ They are the Strand, 
Shamokin, Pa., the Chester Street Sun- 
bury, Conn., and the Rialto, Jamaica, L. I. 
Joe Eckl is handling the booking for all 
three. 



NEW REVUE FOR ROONEY AND BENT 

Pat Rooney and Marion Bent will short- 
ly withdraw from their current vaudeville 
revue, "Rings of Smoke," to appear in a 
new tabloid called "Shamrocks." 

"Rings of Smoke'' will be routed over 
the Pantagcs time, under the direction of 
Rooney, with two others replacing Rooney 
and Bent in the act. 



MORRIS SUES MACK 

William Morris, filed suit last week in 
the Munidpal Court against Charles R. 
Mack, vaudeville actor, for breach of con- 
tract and agent's coimnlssions due to the 
sum of $294.00 as per contract made July 
5, 1921. 

MARKS AND WILSON SPLIT 

Ben Marks and Dolly Wilson have dis- 
solved their vaudeville partnership after 
working together for two years. Marks 
will break in a single act shortly, and Miss 
Wilson also intends to return to a solo 
offering. 



April 25. 1923 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



9 




PALACE 

This show will probably remain the high 
spot in Eddy Darling's teokiDK career for 
many weeks to come, for there is no 
"volnerable heel" in any spot, more than 
half of the acts stopping the show cold, 
and all of them of a type that make a gen- 
eral appeal to the patrons. 

An artistic team of equilibrists, R. & W. 
Roberts, opened a powerful first half, with 
a skillful exhibition of hand balancing, con- 
tortion and other stunts along similar lines. 

In the second spot, Dave Roth offe'-ed a 
versatile routine, including a pianologue, a 
bit of song and some dancing. His closing 
dance with a dummy, apparently, went over 
big and for an encore he took a bow with 
a real live girl. 

Orchestra entertainment as exemplified 
by the S. S. Leviathan Orchestra, leaves 
little to be desired, and absolutely no room 
for improvement. The fourteen musicians 
form a world beating combination from 
every conceivable angle. Both the brass 
and saxophone sections are composed of 
musicians who arc masters of their instru- 
ments, and the orchestra on the whole is 
unusually versatile, carrying a quartet 
capable of putting songs over, and Mort 
Downey, a lyric tenor of charming voice, 
who almost stopped the act with his rendi- 
tion of "My Wonderful One." Other se- 
lections by the orchestra included "Flower 
of Araby' and "Running Wild," and a 
corking version of the Gallagher and Shean 
song. The United States Shipping Board 
presents the orchestra, incidentally, using 
it to good advantage for propaganda in 
favor of American vessels. The boys have 
a clean cut appearance and are clad in im- 
maculate white flannel, navy garb. Their 
salute after each selection, however, seems 
out of place, for the band is not in either 
military or naval service. The staging by 
R. H. Bumside is a novelty in itself and 
enough to put an act over. 

William Hallen and Mabel Russell in 
"The Service Station," drew gales of 
laughter from the audience, proving the 
former to be a comedian of outstanding 
merit Hallen has old stories as well as 
new; but in his case the point of the joke 
was not always the high spot, but his real 
funny way of putting them over, getting 
laughs while the story was en-routc. 

The grand old veteran minstrel, Eddie 
Leonard, in "The Minstrel's Delight," as- 
sisted by Steward and Olive, closing the 
first half, kept up the good work of stop- 
ping the show, registering one ot the trium- 
phant hits of his vaudeville career. There 
is a sentiment and a feeling on the part of 
the audience toward Eddie Leonard that is 
rare and existing but for few stage fa- 
vorites. As usual his singing and dancing 
proved to be in a class by itself, and 
Stewart and Olive rendered capable as- 
sistance. 

Emilie Lea with Clarence Rock and Sam 
Kaufman, opened the second half in "Re- 
hearsing for Vaudeville" a vehicle which 
gives a dancing act, a bit of song, comedy 
and piano solo. Miss Lea, as it happens, 
is a rare combination of dancer and singer 
with a beautiful voice and all of her 
efforts, singing or dancing were cute and 
pleasing. Her variety of high kicks, par- 
ticularly the side kick is still something for 
the patrons to marvel at and gives the act 
the necessary punch. 

Lillian Shaw, revealed a brand of Comedy 
that knocked 'em dead, especially the bride 
and after marriage bits which held no end 
of fun for the womenfolk. Which does not 
mean that the rest of the house didn't 
laugh. Miss Shaw is a comedienne of no 
mean proportions but should refrain from 
over-doing her Yiddish remarks. 

Wellington Cross, assisted by a cast of 
four, offered the playlet "Wives," a satire 
that is clever and equally well done, carry- 
ing laughs and a theory as well, the action 
bemg pleasing throughout. 

Van and Schenck, dosed the show, with 
their well known delivery of popular songs, 
holding them well though it was late. 

M. H. S. 



VAUDEVILLE REVIEWS 



ALHAMBRA 

This week the Alhambra has a fine bill 
from the first act to the last. Each act is 
different in style from the other, a real 
variety bill with entertainment value of 
the highest. Unquestionably, Marion Harris 
walked away with first honors on Mon- 
day, although the rest were not far be- 
hind, Cadie and Gy^, Harry Bums & Co., 
and Elsa Ryan gomg strong. 

Joe and Willie Hale, two jugglers of 
more than ordinary ability and possessed 
of fine showmanship, opened the ceremonies, 
proving an opening act of unusual ability. 

Jess Block and Francine Dunlop, follow- 
ing, have as cleverly written an act as has 
been heard in these parts in some time. 
The act is carried through to the finish, 
the title, "Broke," giving the idea about 
which it is written. Both Block and Miss 
Dunlop are good performers, the latter 
haying an excellent personality and Block 
doin^ some great acrobatic dancing as well 
as smging agreeably. 

An unusual feature of the program was 
the billing of Meehan's Canmes in third 
position. After seeing die act it can readily 
be understood why the position is war- 
ranted. The finish of the act is remark- 
ably successful in that the idea of a con- 
test is conveyed to the audience^ the folks 
out front cheering and applauding the fine 
jumping of two of the animals, in fact, 
pickmg their favorites and yelling for them. 
The animals are intelligent and jockey for 
bows like old performers. 

Harry Bums and Company, presenting 
their familiar vehicle, "I Think You 
Touch," are old favorites at this house and 
went big. Their offering has been changed 
for the better since last seen by this re- 
viewer and is now one fine succession of 
laughs all the way through. 

Maryon Vadie and Ota Gygi have an 
unusually artistic act. Miss Vadi is a 
charming little dancer, whose toe work is 
delightful. Gygi is a violinist par ex- 
cellence. The four girls used for the 
aesthetic dancing. The Portia Mansfield 
Dancers, are beautiful creatures admirably 
instructed. Of their routines the Rhytlvnic 
Games number is^the outstanding feature, 
a thing of exquisite beauty to delight any 
beholder. 

Opening intermission, Herbert Clifton, 
the female impersonator with the extensive 
wardrobe, went over in good style, his act 
having speeded up considerably since it 
first opened, and his burlesquing came 
more naturally. 

Elsa Ryan, assisted by Rodncv Ranous, 
appeared in a sketch by Dion Titheradge 
that owes its success to the remarkable 
personality of Miss Ryan. The idea is 
not strikingly original but the little lady 
fills it with such charm and individuality 
that it appears not only plausible but real. 
The actress has hit upon the trick of re- 
peating and faltering in her lines in order 
to give the impression of saying the words 
for the first time, the result being strikingly 
effective. Her ad-libbing was a feature and 
her st^port is good. 

Manoh Harris is another young lady 
who simply exudes personality. Following 
a short opening which mentions her phono- 
graph record work she goes' through a 
repertoire of numbers and renders each 
one in a manner all her own. She stojtped 
the show cold and had them begging ner 
for "just one more." Naturally her songs 
run more to the blues type, her repertoire 
consisting of "Who Cares," "You Got to 
See Mamma," "I Gave You Up," "St. 
Louis Blues," "Aggravatin' Papa." and 
several other numbers of like quality. J. 
Russell Robinson, at the piano, fills in with 
several of his own compositions while 
Miss Harris is changing. 

Fridtdn, Jr., and Rhoda closed the long 
bill with a difficult and well executed danc- 
ing act. C. C 



COLONIAL 

Harold Lloyd in "Safety Last" is pull- 
ing them into the Colonial during the cur- 
rent week. Lloyd and this film replace 
three acts in the vaudeville layout, which 
consists of six acts. The matinee on Mon- 
day was good, in fact bigger than the 
opening performance of last week's, which 
had Pat Rooney to draw them. 

Sultan, a trained pony, introduced by 
an attractive youn^ lady who put him 
through his routine, opened the show. The 
girl is a good show-woman, and puts every 
liRle bit over to big results. T^e animal 
gave an exhibition of stunt-; in arithmetic 
and a few comedy bits which held interest 
and drew very good applause at the finish. 

Montana, a wizard of the banjo, wowed 
them on number two. His appearance is 
great, being outfitted from head to foot 
in white, even to the boots, hat, and the 
pearl-handled revolver at his hip. His 
repertoire ranges from a march number, 
to popular published and old Dixie soogs. 
The "Three O'Qock In the Moming" 
number, which included an exhibition in 
four part harmony and double picking, and 
also giving the impression that two banjos 
were being played was excellently done. 

Thomas J. Ryan, of the old-time Ryan 
and Kelly and Ryan Ritchfield cooAina- 
tions, is offering a playlet by Edgar Allan 
Woolf, called "Ahead of the Times," in 
which Ryan is assisted by Hazel Flint and 
Ralph Bond. Ryan appears as a "Jiggs" 
character, who is living with his daughter, 
the latter, a young widow. He refuses to 
allow any of the servants to wait on him, 
but insists upon her doing so. When she 
tells him that she is going to marry again 
and wants to send him off to the old men's 
home, and tells him that he has not kept 
up with the times, he decides to show her 
that he is not as reactionary as she thinks. 
He arranges with the chauffeur to tele- 
phone him in a woman's voice, and pre- 
tend that he has been hitting the high spots 
ivith wild women. This brmgs her around 
and she says she won't ma rr y and will 
continue to live with him. The offering 
isn't quite worthy of Edgar Allan Woolf. 
but may serve Ryan as a vehicle, for it is 
his dance bits at the finish which put it 
over. 

Bill Robinson switched spots with Mae 
West for the matinee and caused a riot 
with his dance work. Robinson is one of 
the best colored performers we've seen in 
vaudeville for years. Personality, show- 
manship, a neat dancer, and a style of de- 
livery that can't miss. 

Mae West and Harry Richman also 
stopped the show. Miss West didn't do 
quite as well as far as getting laughs are 
concerned as she has done when they did 
the act before. This may be due to the 
fact that they hadn't done the act in so 
long, for she had developed into a dandy 
performer. Richman is class from start 
to finish, both from appearance and ability 
viewpoints. His piano work, even though 
most of it is accompaniment makes an 
audience cry for more, and his singing is 
sure-fire. He's an artist in everything he 
does. 

Felix Ferdinando and His Havana Or- 
chestra closed the show. The organization 
consists of twelve men, and uses two 
pianos. It has great possibilities, but the 
repertoire needs re-routing. Bows should 
also be taken with the regular stage lights 
on, and not the colored ones. Bill Robin- 
son did a dance at the finish and tied 
things up. The last half consisted of 
Harold Uoyd in "Safety Last." 

G. J. H. 



BUD SNYDER FOR ENGLAND 

Bud Snyder, tramp cyclist has been 
booked for an eight week tour of the Moss 
Grcuit of English theatres beginning i/Uiy 
23. He will sail for England on May 9. 



RIVERSIDE 

An eight act bill which combined evenr 
department of entertainment and which 
was sufficiently variegated to offer a 
wealth of entertainment held sway at the 
Riverside last Monday afternoon. The 
balmy weather was undoubtedly felt at the 
box ofiSce, the show having played to the 
slimmest Monday matinee assembla^ of 
the season. 

Valentine and Bell started proceedings 
with a combination of clever cycling and 
gymnasts. The man does some remark-' 
ably^ clever stmts on the cycle, while his 
feminine partner holds up her end of the 
task with some tattling good gymnastics 
and does some clever leaps in which she 
lands squarely upon the shoulders of her 
partner who is constantly in motion, thus 
making the feat a greater thriller. 

Lauretta Rhodes and Rnth Watson of- 
fered a song cycle which was captioned 
"A Musical Menu" and gave them ample 
opporttmity to display their voices in the 
songs thef like best to sing. They work 
in. one with a piano and each alternates 
with the other as either singer or accom- 
panist 

The brunette opens the act with "Bnrs- 
ing Sands," to be followed by her partner 
in a medley which contrasts the classics 
with the more modem numbers. The 
bnmette returns for "Dear Little Lady of 
Yesterday," which provides a great set-tip 
for her partner's ensuing potpourri of old 
fashioned songs. The girls got over nicely 
in this early spot and can tmdoohtedly 
duplicate their Riverside hit elsewhere. 

Enest Anderson and Rnth Wataon of- 
fered a novel scenic comedietta by Paul 
Gerard Smith, entitled "The Dizzy 
Heights." The action is laid atop the 
snow-dad Alps. A fresh air fiend has de- 
cided upon this locale for his honeymoon, 
mach to the discomfort of his newly ac- 
quired sponse. Her timidity and home- 
sickness for Freeport furnishes the basis 
for the comedy which is handled in Smith's 
best style. The players give a tcit apt 
delineation of their roles and the feature 
will, score anywhere. 

Rome and Gaut duplicated their previous 
successes in their familiar mixture of 
songs, dances and downing. The ex- 
tremity of the statue of the partners in it- 
self proves a great asset for comedy and 
the boys never muff an opportunity to 
make the most of it 

Valerie Ber^ere and Companjr dosed the 
first section m her serio-comic tragedy, 
"O Joy San," which is portrayed in the 
picturesque surroundings of Japan. It is 
practically the "Madam Butterfly" formu- 
la dressed anew and gives Miss Bergere 
perhaps the best role she has ever had as 
the little Japanese from which the piece 
gets its title. 

Miss Bergere gives an excellent inter- 
pretation of the little Jap. The role is a 
most exacting one in that it blends subtle 
humor with heavy emoti^al acting. Never- 
theless Miss Bergere measured up to the 
task most promisingly and earned many 
rounds of applause. Violet Bamey is per- 
fection in her character. 

Walter and Emily Walters opened the 
second section and got over niceljr in their 
novel ventriloquial offering, featuring "The 
Baby's Cry," a reproduction of a whining 
babe which is renarkably well done by 
Miss Walters. 

The Marion Morgan Dancers proved 
themselves worthy of stellar position on 
the bill in their delectable dance drana, 
"Helen Of Troy," which is divided into a 
prolof^ue and three scenes and has been 
conceived and staged by Miss Morgan. 
The ballet brings to the fore some partic- 
ularly finished exponents of the terp- 
sichorean art headed by Josephine McLean 
and Oiarles Haverlm. The costuming and 
lighting was in remarkably good taste and 
the dancing was indeed a treat for those 
present 

At Herman dosed the show with his 
familiar expose of the previous acts and a 
number of songs. E. J. B. 



10 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 25j 1923 




EIGHTY-FIRST STREET 

Whatever doubt anyone has ever har- 
bored as to the popularity of Harold 
Lloyd, the screen star, from a box office 
standpoint, was graphically dispelled at 
this house last Monday night, when the 
showMg of his latest and generally conced- 
ed greatest rinrma contribotion "Safety 
Last" attracted an audience that packed 
the auditorium of the spadons theatre from 
pit to dome. The film is being shown 
here in conjunction with the regular 
vaudeville program, but owing to the 
length of running time, five acts are being 
offered instead of the usual six which- gen- 
erally comprise the bill. 

Those who are in the know as to what 
money consideration achieved this first 
showing for the Keith houses claim it 
involved a sum hitherto tmheard of for 
an initial showing of a feature film after 
its abowing on Broadway. Whatever the 
Keith foQc gave up, it was well worth iL 

Bessye CUirord, the comely and shapely 
mnArnl opened the bill with a score or 
more of artistic poses. She stands upon 
a suspended pedestal while a stereoption 
throws various slides upon the white- 
screened background, making her the cen- 
tral figure in various groupings, which in- 
clude a number of the old masters. 

Wm and Gladys Ahem supply a re- 
freshing breath of the woolly west with 
their ^^awrtng - lariat manipidation. The 
girl is a good-looker, who gets in some 
clever stepping that is eohanced by a per- 
sonality that reaches far across tlie lights 
and brings her audience into her heart. 
The man also can hold his own as a dancer. 
He also slings a mean lariat and manages 
to convulse the mob with his comply 
slant on the topics of the day^ whirii he 
tsmdlcs with a det^re .of ease equaled only 
by Will Rogers. Their versatility and ma- 
terial bunched together makes foe a de- 
Ushtfnl offering tlut brought many rounds 
of well merited applanse. 

The Briants were also strong features 
of the bin in their novel slant on acrobatic 
offerings, "The Dream of the Moving 
Man." The men. are discovered snoozing 
on the job of a removal task somewhere 
in the ghetto. One of them has fallen 
asleep while gazing upon a_ clothing 
dummy. In his sleep he grabs his partner, 
who permits himself to be tossed around, 
giving At impression that he is manipulat- 
ing a dummy. At the finish the dummy 
comes to life and both walk off. The 
man doing the dummy gives an impression 
of a lifeless figure that is lucannily real. 
He oontribntes the greatest bit of panto- 
mine acting that has thus far been shomi 
upon the American stage. Through his 
tossing around he never moves a muscle 
of his facT, nor in any way reveals that he 
is a human being instead of the bundle of 
rags the audience is led to believe him to 
be. The Briants have contributed much 
that is new to the variety stage in their 
previons cootribations, but in their present 
vehicle they have easily surpassed them- 
selves. 

The Bison City Four followed with 
their condiination of comedy and songs. 
Tbeir whole £rame-up reminds one of the 
quartette acts of the Tony Pastor era. For 
uieir comedy they depend almost excusive- 
]y upon the brand of "joke" that got by 
in those days and demonstrate that the 
same fonnnla can get by with equally good 
results today. The men appear as the 
routine comedr quartette characters, such 
as the tramp; the wop, the cop and the 
barkeepL They get over individually in 
strfos and pack a wicked harmony punch 
in tiie oisembles. 

Holmes and La Vere closed the show 
with a novelty, most of which is played in 
a minatnre Uiealr e box. Domestic strife 
is emi^yed for the comedy punch. They 
peruse the program and team that the act 
tfaey are aboot to witness has been ginnpsed 
so often by them that they know it by 
heart. In the ensuing scene the act they 
do is supposed to be their dream. 



BROADWAY 

The bill at the Broadway this week was 
cut down to six acts at each iperfonnance, 
due to the presence of the Harold Lloyd 
comedy, "Safety Last." Unfortunately, at 
the first mommg show, only five of the 
scheduled six acts put in an appearance. 
Although the program was short it con- 
tained three top-notch acts in Margaret 
Severn, Moran and Mack and the Runaway 
' Four. 

Opening the show came Selvas, Brann 
and Company. The company is a person- 
able yonng lady who doesn't do much of 
anything but helps dress the act The two 
men do some good work, the man on the 
ground, in a naval officer's uniform, bal- 
ancing his fiartner, in sailor's clothes, on 
the top end of a long pole. The repertoire 
is difficult but lost its punch somewhat be- 
cause it closely followed the Harold Lloyd 
feature, in which that actor appears to be 
taking some desperate chances. 

Kelly and Pollack have been seen in 
vaudeville for some time and should know 
better than to expect laughs on some of 
their material so early in the morning. If 
they were to take out all but the finish of 
their act and then build an entirely new act 
around the finish they would have a great 
vehicle. As it is, this finish puts the act 
over, although the rest of the act is just 
so mudi waste. From the time the woman 
comes out in her tough make-up until after 
the fast dance finish the act |;oe5 great 
and scores all the way. But in the be- 
ginning the act drags, the money talks bit, 
the "Portugese and Greeks" song and the 
rest of the material being old stuff and 
more or less done to deadi. 

Margaret Severn, assisted by a pianist 
and two clever male Spanish dancers, were 
the artistic treat of the bill. Miss Severn 
is possessed of unusual grace, the way 
she uses her arms and hands bein^ par- 
ticularly noticeable. Her pianist is ac- 
complished and speaks distinctly and in- 
telligently. The two other men in the 
act give two fine Spanish routines that 
are worthy of a good hand. But it is the 
work with the Benda masks for which Miss 
Severn is noted and it is in this work tiiat 
she excels. We were sorry that she per- 
formed only two dances with the masks, 
as we could have stood several more with- 
out tiring. It is wonderful, the way she 
manages to posture and depict char- 
acter represented by the mask she happens 
to be wearing. Her whirlwind finish goes 
over tremendously and brought a great 
hand. 

Moran and Mack, two blackface boys 
who talk as if that were their natural 
color, are a great treat for any audience. 
When this team are billed you can always 
be sure of a good laugh and at least two 
new pieces of material. They keep chang- 
ing and building their act all the time, al- 
though they still keep in the boxing bit, 
which is a wow. Their talk about the 
early bird catching the worm had -the 
house roaring. It is their slow, easy man- 
ner of worlang and their fine sense for 
comedy values, as much as the material 
they use, ftat puts the act over so success- 
fully. 

In the Runaway Four vaudeville has 
an act that is a sure-fire attraction. These 
four boys work with fine showmanship, 
■ the comedian getting his stuff across with- 
out any effort and registering heavily. The 
others have good voices, when they feel 
like singing, and can step a little when 
they have to. But it is as acrobats that 
die quartette shine. Thdr, tumbling is 
pat on so quick and b so good that it 
has the audience gasping for breath and 
applauding one after the other imtil the 
applause seems continnous. The act is a 
wow and is staged admirably to get the 
best results for the boys' particular talents. 

Chaplow and Carleton were the team 
that were scheduled to appear but did not 
show up, and Mehan and Newman anH 
Hampton and Blake are also on the bill 
at the Broadway but' were not caueht at 
the early show. C. C. 



PALACE 

(Chicago) 

Eight acts and an afterpiece revue, the 
latter bong tacked on to the offering of 
the Seattle Harmony Kings, go to make 
up a strong program here this wedc 
Harry Langdon is supposed to have the 
main part in the afterpiece, but "^ed" 
Johnson, of Johnson and Baker, tan away 
with the comedy honors of the affair. 

The headline honors are bdng split be- 
tween' Velaska Suratt and the Seattle Har- 
mony Kings. Johnson and Baker open the 
show with their hat juggling and comedy 
which gave an unusually good start to 
the show. 

Pietro was his usual big hit with his 
piano accordion, on second. He can make 
his instrument talk. 

Harry Langdon and Company appeared 
in a travesty which combined golfmg and 
autoing and found the audience ready to 
laugh at everything he did. 

The Seattle Harmony Kings have one 
of the best orchestra offerings which have 
been ' seen here. Jack NeiU, the leader, 
stands out, as does Hall Hiatt, the clarinet 
player. Gene Collins has a dance routine 
thaifs sure-fire and the audience could 
watch him dance forever. The revue af- 
terpiece followed the orchestra. 

It wasn't easy for Myers and Hanaford 
to follow all this, but they more than held 
their own with their rube comedy and 
went over for a trig hit. 

Valeska Suratt offered "Silks, Satins, 
Calico and Rags," a vehicle which enables 
her to appear to very good advantage. It 
is entertaining from start to finish and 
adds to her popularity. 

Miss Patricola held the next^o-dosmg 
spot and scored the hit of the show, with 
her songs and violin routine. She was 
called back and compelled to render en- 
core after encore. 

Perez and Marguerite brought the bill 
to a close with juggling stunts which in- 
cluded some sensational work. R. El. R. 



MAJESTIC 

(CUcago) 

Chicago, April 23. — The Majestic show, 
seen Sunday night, includes an act or two 
in, for Sunday only, along with most of the 
regular bill and made one of the strongest 
programs seen at that house for some 
time. 

Jack and Jessie Gibson, prevented from 
appearing at this house recently through 
illness, opened the show and offered stunts 
on unicycles which are splendidly pre- 
sented. 

Ray and Edna Tracey did decidedly well 
in second spot with an offering in which 
the comedy of the young lady at the piano 
stands out 

John and Nellie Olms centered attention 
to tricks wiA clocks and watches, ad- 
mirably presented and affording constant 
surprise and highly entertaining mysticism. 

Earl and Edwards, who offer parodies in 
such a way as to make a dandy act, took 
encores and then left the audience hungry 
for more. 

The Royal Venetian Five registered 
strongly with operatic singing and instru- 
mental touches. 

McGood, Lenzen and Company have such 
a classy acrobatic act that it is a real 
departure from the ordinary. The tricks 
accomplished are not only the last word 
in their line but they are admirably done. 

Pierce and Ryan provide splendid en- 
tertainment whidi4ias novelty through the 
comedian taking an old man character. 

Henry Antrim and Company in a sec- 
ond edition of "Along Broadway," have 
a revue which is classy and which intro- 
duces song hits from the big musical shows 
and dancing specialties. Hazel Moore, 
prima donna, has an exceptional voice of 
quality and scored big. The dancer in 
the act executes her numbers with skill. 
This is by far the best thing .Antrim has 
done in \'audeville. R. E. R. 



STATE-LAKE 

(Chicago) 

Lady Alice's Pets is the first offering 
of an entertaining bill, and gives the 
show a good start Lon and Paula Miller, 
a sister team hold the second spot with 
a routine' of piano, violin and singing bits, 
with some dancing thrown in tor good 
measure. The girls worked hard and gave 
a very good account of themselves. 

Frances Williams and Miss Vanessi, as- 
sisted by Arthur Freed and Jack Qifford, 
at two loanos, were the first hit of the 
show. The act is staged attractively, and 
the girls dance exceptionally well. One 
delivers popular songs to ^ood results. In 
addition to playing the piano, one of the 
boys also sings in a good baritone voice. 
The act is worthy of a spot lower on the 
biU. 

Jack George appeared in blackface and 
did a routine of comedy on King Tut, and 
then a sermon which were filled with 
laughs. An unbilled young lady assists 
him and made a good foil for his remarks. 

Jimmy Morgan's Orchestra proved to be 
a real musical treat The organization 
consists of nine men who know the art of 
repression and use it They played five 
numbers and had to do two encores. Betty 
Morgan, who used to do a two act witb 
Jimmy sang two numbers with the boys 
and deliveroi them effectively. 

Swartz and Qifford scored a comedy hit, 
keeping the laughs coming their way 
steadily. Gus Fowler offered his illusions 
with the myriads of watches and mystified 
all. Fowler has one of the best acts of its 
land in vaudeville. He works fast and 
the offering doesn't lack for interest for 
one moment. 

W. C Fields and Frank Hurst and Eddie 
Vogt did not appear at this performance. 

R. E. R. 



COLONIAL MAY STAY OPEN 

The Colonial Theatre will be kept open 
this year instead of closing as usual, if 
this wedc's experiment with a summer 
policy of six acts and a feature picture 
proves successful. The tentative date set 
for the closing was' May 7, and should it 
be decided to keep the house open, it will 
assume the summer policy on that day. 
This week the house is playing Harold 
Lloyd in "Safety Last'| aiid six acts. It 
will play the regular big tiuM policy be- 
ginning next week until a decision is made 
as to whether to keep it open or not. 

EUROPEAN TRIPS POSTPONED 

Ruth Roye and Tom Patricola, both of 
whom were booked for engagements in 
England this summer, have set back their 
dates until next year. Miss Roye has 
numerous American engagements she 
wants to fulfill this summer, while Patri- 
cola recently signed a contract to appear 
in George White's new show which will be 
staged early in June. William Morris, 
arranged the txx^ngs for both parties 
and Stained the extension of time for 
them as well. 



R0MAN05 IN NEW YORK 

Phil Romanos paid a short visit to New 
York this week. His orchestra which was 
booked for ten weeks at the Hotel Ken- 
more, Albany, has been held over for six 
additibnal weeks. They have also been 
featured at Proctor's Albany Theatre. Ih 
June. Mr. Romanos will start a tour of 
the Adirondack Mountains Summer resort, 
and next season he will return to tthe 
Kenmore. 



TEX McLEOD COMING HERE 

Tex McLeod, an American performer 
who has been appearing in Europe for the 
past number of years, and is said to have' 
become as clever as Will Rogers, will open 
in Keith vaudeville at the Royal Theatre 
on September 3. - McLeod does a rope- 
spinning and monologue act. 



April 25, 1923 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 





PROCTOR'S FIFTH AVE. 

(Lact Half) 

A seven act bill, instead of the usual eight, 
with Wellington Cross in "Wives" and Mollie 
Fuller in ''Twilight" sharing toplioe honors, 
ushered in the Ust half here on last Thurs- 
day aftcmfwn. 

Powell and Brown proved most adeqnale pace- 
makers in an artistic novelty captioned "Stun* 
sand," in which they pattern landscapes and 
other sketches on huge box frames by tossing 
colored powders across the surface and ac- 
complish a result that would be a credit to an 
old master. In their £nal sketchings they de- 
picted a volcano in action and a steamer afire, 
utilizing an electrical effect to provide the 
flames. 

, Fred Bernard and Sid Garry, two likeable 
youths, deuced with a song and dance offering. 
In their dosing number, "At the Actors Ball," 
they alternated in giving impressions of Eddie 
Leonard, Karyl Norman, Eddie Cantor and Al 
Jolson, all of which were remarkably well done 
and brought a good finish hand. 

Mollie Fuller and Company held down third 
spot with "Twilight," which is a madc-to-order 
vehicle for the blind actress, yet gives her an 
opportunity to pack a heart wallop amidst much 
philosophic buffoonery. Miss Fuller is dis- 
closed in a hideaway resort in the mountains, 
where she has gone to rest and to forget the 
Broadway that seems to have forgotten her. 
A penurious landlady constantly reminds her 
that she is several weeks in arrears with her 
board. Mollie has faith that ber friends will 
find her and take care of her. Her faith is 
rewarded when a pseudo Bert Savoy crashes 
out of an aeroplane and into the scene to in- 
form her that Ziegfeld wants her for a new 
^'Follies." Mollie departs, headed for the 
Broadway that has not forgotten her. Miss 
Fuller is particularly splendid throughout. 
Her recitation "Broadway" and her star gaxtng 
episode will be sure fire applause stuff in any 
house, while the Bert Savoy impression and 
the stage-struck tendencies of the bneoUc land* 
lady give the piece a proper comedy balance. 

Jim' McWilliams, the pianist, proved as amos* 
ing as ever with his line of hokum and piano 
logue. McWilliams works with a rare degree 
of case which makes him enjoyable in any- 
thing he attempts. Of course bis real punch 
is scored in his travesty on a grand opera in 
which be mimics the entire cast from the 
chorus to the leading singers. For an encore 
he offered bis wordless ditty, "Linger Longer 
Lou." 

Wellington Cross, whom vaudeville and 
musical comedy has previously Imown as a song 
and dance man. revealed remarkable talent as 
a farceur in "Wives." Cross essays the role of 
the author of a risque novel which exposes 
the romantic side of the married women. Of 
course all of them have read the book and 
within the .family circle have denounced the 
author. But when they meet htm, as the re- 
sult of a wager, th^ fall into hia arms and 
agree that he certainly understands women. 

Santcfi and Hayes, who previously have trod 
the two-a*day boards replenished with a revnetta 
or flash act, are going it alone and standing 
upon their own merits in a happy mixture of 
comedy and songs. Their act is as pleasing as 
ever and gets over for a sure-fire bit on any bill. 

Claude and Marion closed the show with 
their clowning and songs. Their material and 
delivery was sufficiently magnetic to hold the 
crowd in until they bowed off. Marion is an 
over-siced comic, whose clowning is spontane- 
ous and who can cause a roar with a single 
gesture. Claude makes an excellent foil for the 
fun*making pVoclivities of his partner. 

E. J. B. 

FRANKLIN 

(Lut Half) 

Five acts for "showings." and a regular bill 
of six acts comprised the show for Thursday 
night. The first of the tiyouts wu Williams 
and Williams, a colored team, whose value 
even in the pop bouses is doubtful. The John 
Grabler Revue stopped the show owing to the 
work of a boy dancer in the act and some 
very good work by a girl who did toe and 
RuBsUn work. Her partner also deserves 
mention. A prima donna sings well. 

George and Lillian Mitcbd^ ulked through 
most of^ their act. and did a little in the line 
of dancing, singing 'and harmonica playing. 

Ruby Gordon,* 'uftsistcd by a girl at the 
piano, was the hig hit of the tryonts. This 
young lady has the makings of another Tucker, 
and if properly developed will make a good 
single for any bill. At present she works a 
little too fast, and would also do well to watch 
her enunciation more carefully. It might also 
be a good thing to remember that one needn't 
pronounce words as a caluret coon*shouter 
genenny does in order to be a successful de- 



lineator cf synccpated numbers. 

Dunlay and Merrill will nuke a good act 
for the small time houses after they speed up 
their talk and cut some of the draggy spots 
out. 

The regular bill was opened by the Australian 
Woodchoppers, who interested all with their 
exhibition in the use of the saw and axe. 

Following the Woodchoppers handicapped 
La Vine and Ritx slightly, for these boys do 
some very difficult dance work, which was 
hindered by the presence of chips left on the 
stage and which should have been swept off, 
but were overlooked. However, La Vine and 
Ritz succeeded in stopping the show cold 
despite the handicap. Most of the work con- 
sists of some impersoaations which scored 
heavily with the audience 

Holland and O'Den also stopped the show 
with their comedy offering. The girl is very 
attractive, and towards the latter half of the 
act. displays a figure and pair of Fianlde 
Baileys which are a large factor in the suc- 
cess of the act. The material uied is aiter- 
taining, but there are several bits which are 
too blue for a refined vaudeville boose, such 
OS the line, "If you look at me like that, 
you're going to stay out mighty late tonight.'* 

Joe Frc^d and Al Uarrin^on and Company 
were the laugh hit of the show. They offered 
several bits from burlesque which made up a 
continual scream of laughter. Freed is one 
of the funniest Dutch comics seen in vaude- 
ville in a long time, and has excellent support 
in bis company. 

Olga Cook, recently oat of "Blossom Time,** 
also scored a big hit. Min Cook's absence 
from vaudeville during the past three years or 
so, which have been spent in productions, have 
been put to good use and as Ur as develop- 
ment of personality is concerned, she's a hun- 
dred per cent improvement on the former 
Olga Cook in vaudeville. Her repertoire is 
well-selected and delightfully stuig in good 
voice. A pianist does well with two solos in 
addition to accompanying her. 

Basile's Band, billed outside of the theatre 
as the Velodrome Band, consisting of twenty- 
five men, closed the show. They played both 
the regular style of band selections, and popu- 
lar numbers. "Crying For You" was well- 
done in a vocal solo by one of the men. 

G. J. H. 



HAMILTON 

(LutHalO 

There were only five acts again on the 
vaudeville for this half of the week, the motion 
picture feature beic^ "Mighty Lak* a Rose," 
but these five acts went to make up a better 
show than a great many six act bilb which 
have been booked into houses. 

For the overture, William McElwain and 
his orchestra played a novelty arrangement of 
"Old King Tut," which drew a big round of 
applanie. Booth and Nina opened the show, 
doing a number of stunts with bicycles, and 
some unusually good talk for an opening act. 
The work on the bikes, contained thrills and 

made a good start for the show. 

Eddie Miller followed, and rendered a cycle 
of popular and semi -classical songs. His voice 
and rendition proved to be more than pleasing 
to the audience and he was called back for an 
encore number before he was permitted to leave. 
A pianist gives good assistance and does well 
with a solo. 

The second act of "The Torch-Bearers," by 
George Kelly, is being presented in vaudeville 
by Rosalie Stewart and Bert French, and 
scored a laugh hit here. Alison Skipworth and 
Mary Boland, who appeared in the original 
cast, are seen in this company. This act is the 
part of the play which had most of the. laughs 
in it, bcinff that part where the amateurs gave 
their benefit performances for the Seamen's 
' Institute, and showing the happenings back- 
stage while the performance went on. Alison 
Skipworth is excellent as Mrs. Pampanelli, the 
directress and is responsible for most of the 
laughs. The others are perfect in their roles. 

Mignon gave a good account of herself with 
a series of impersonations, which included 
Emma Trentini, Eddie Leonard, Ruth Roye, 
Nan Hatperin, Bernard Granville and Gallagher 
and Shean. 

Vadie and Gygi, assisted by hfary Izant at 
the piano, and the Portia Mansfield flancers 
'closed the show. The four girls included in 
the latter,''8how to very good advantage in their 
dance numbers. Maryon Vadie is the very 
spirit of terpsiehore . with her work, and Gypi's 
violin playing is in itself worth coming to 
hear. - Miss Izant is an anusually good piano 
accompaoist. G. J. H. 

Moore and Freed have arrived in New 
York to start their tour of the local 
Keith houses for nine weeks, at the 
Royal Theatre. 



STATE 

(Lut Hatf) 

Long Tack Sam and company are heading 
the vaudeville bill here for the week, having 
closed on the Keith Circuit a few days ago. 
The act is probably one of the best offerings 
of its land ever prcorated in vaudeville, being 
well staged, elaborate, and competently handled 
by the company. Long Tack Sam himself dis- 
plays a style of showmanship tmuaual for an 
Oriental combining his latent ability with 
American pep, and offers a variety of Chinese 
stunts pleasing to both old and young. In 
the closing position, the act wound up the 
vaudeville end of the bill with a bang. 

Others on the bill offered diversified en- 
tertainment, the Fantasy Dancers, opening the 
show with some norvelty steps, one of the 
quartet doing a female impersonatioii as well 
as dancing. The routine in addition to being 
a novelty is really fantastic, in a way. 

A pleasing musical combination Fletcher and 
Pasquale, one specializing on the saxophone 
and the other on the concertina, all of their 
selections being well rendered. 

Louts London, doing a bit of numotogue, 
and singing several songs in a powerful tenor 
voice, proved to be a breezy sort of person, r 
who ' works with assurance and has conifidaice 
in his ability to make a good impreasioau One 
of his bits was a dance done with a dummy 
gathering a few laughs as hf went along. 
London's voice is far above the average and 
this alone would sell the act. In addition to 
this he has a style that is worthy of big time 
vaudeville. 

Grey and Byron, have a fair sort of vehicle, 
the boy doing well as juvenile, and the girl 
fiAt as a flapper and then in evening gown 
enlertairting a caller at her home, doing eqtially 
wdL The act opens in one with the boy doing 
a song and the girl as a flapper interrupting, 
etc, which leads into some dialogue. Later 
calling at her home the comedy picked up a 
little. The Utter set in "two" was well done 
and the weak parts of the act seem to be the 
songs, most of which were offered by the male 
member of the team. More punch put into the 
vool numbers would strengthoi the offering 
considerably. 

Another comedy offering followed in the 
next to closing spot in McCoy and Walton 
man and girl, the former as a comic, but not 
too pronounced and the latter pUying straight, 
working in a way that was always good for 
laughs when she broke loose. Most of the 
cross-fire on the man and wife argument order 
was fast and funny, and the girl affected a 
scrappy style, threatening to lick the man any 
moment etc., and so worked up many funny 
bits of business. M. H. S. 



REGENT 

(LutHalO 

The bill at the Regent the last half of this 
week suffered somewhat becaose of three full- 
suge acts following each other. This caused 

an uneomfortablc stage-wait b et w e e n the acts 
of Ferry Corw'ey and Nathane and Sully and 
interfered seriously with the latter team's suc- 
cess. Outside of this the bill was pleasing 
and went over well. 

Laster Brothers, two contortionists who have 
each an excellent routine and indulge in some 
clean clowning, opened the bill and showed an 
act that is strong enough to work further down 
on the bill. , , 

Ryan, Weber and Ryan followed with a song 
and dance act. ' This is evidently the Ryan 
Sisters and a man named Weber, the latter an 
excellent dancer, doing some giMd clog and 
eccentric work. The girls have rather ' weak 
voices but speak distinctly cnoogh to be under- 
stood and get what special material they use 
over. They are stronger on the dancing and 
use some good costumes. 

Ferry Corwcy, the musical clown, continues 
to meet with the same success in every house 
he i^ya. He has by far the finest act of 
its land on the time, his attention to detail and 
his comedy bits being finely worked out and 
put over with a natural comedy that wins all 
the way. 

Nathane and Sully, after a long wait, had the 
curtain pulled on them before they were set but 
overcame this difficulty by jtmiping right into 
their opening number, **ftomany Love," and 
keeping the act going at good speed all the 
way. They scored heavily. 

Irene Ricardo, using two special numbers and 
working at this honse as a single for the first 
time, was accorded a reception on her open- 
ing and stopped the show when she closed the 
act- She nscs-much of her old act and a good 
deal that is new. We must say, however, *that 
we do not like the explanation of "dat's how 
de horse was coming to' me," that she uses now 
as well .IS the old bit she -used. However sho 
can get away with anything because of her 



natural feelinft for comedy and her delivery. 

Field's Family Ford closed the bill. The act 
suffers because many of the characters in the 
sketch are practically inaudible. James Grady» 
who plays the sorely tried Mr. Fliverton, labors 
mightily to cany the act through but the rest 
of the people in the act are inclined to drag, 
spoiling the spontaneous effect of the act. The 
finish is still weak, as ft was in the "Follies." 
evctf weaker, as the sight of Ray Dooley, with 
legs in the air in the Ziegfeld show was 
usually good for a laugh. C, C. 

PROCTOR'S 23RD STREET 

A nnderille bill of ux acta, aaffielcnllr 
wiegated to proridc anappy enter^inineBt and 
the motion picttlre play, "Mighty a' Roae,*' 

abated honor, oa. the new bill bcic Tbe 
picture play was nndonbtedly the draw which 
packed them in deipite tbe balminoa of 
Thursday erenio, and will tmdonbtly repeat 
tbe "trick" for tbe (ubacquent peifonnancci. 

Badali and Nalali, opened the ihow with an 
artistic <lance noTclty, ahowinff practically 
ererytbins possible in tbe way of neat atepplns. 
Their oSerijig is moontcd ai > prodoetion and 
camcs a pianist, who when not accorapanyinff 
them for the daneei, renders a aolo or two 
that is ninally well enjoyed. Tbe dancers open 
with an acrobatic dno. Nalali follow* with a 
jau toe dance, while her partner enonters 
with a clever Rtiaisan dance. They Join forces 
in another derer donble for a finish. 

Young and Wbccler, pianist and yiolintst. 
followed on with a musical offering that found 
instant appeal with a none too entbnaiaatic 
audience. Although the gceater part of their 
repcrtoira ia gird oTcr to classic selecttons, 
they (losed with a lirdy medley that sot them 
off to load applause. - 

Lee and Cranston offered a highly dlvcfting 
comedy, intenperied with sang, called "Hooey- 
moon House." Tbe plot rerolyes around .an 
estranged couple, who meet at the icaie of 
their fiitt boneynoon, which, by coincidence, 
both have selected for their second honeymoon. 
After moch comedy chatter Ihcy d«ide to 
leave their new niitma waitinc at the cbtuch 
to re-enter matrimony, with each other. Tbe 
act is played in pleasing tempo, with tbe songs 
nicely interwoven and tbe entire affair anf- 
ficiently well balanced to get over for a bis 
bit. 

Morsan Wooky and Company also offered a 
lively comedietta, "Good Graaons,** which 
ntillie* the mistakai identity theme and is 
handled anffieienlly fast and foriow to be- 
wilder tbe sleepy honse boy of a road honse. 
who reminds one of tbe half-wit of **Tbe 
Tavern." 

Inglis and Winchcsto-, not comics, were alio 
a boon to the comedy departmat in a pot- 
pouri of nonsense, which included a goodly 
portion of the stuff Inglia baa been doing with 
various partners. Nevertheless it baa not lost 
its laugh getting qualities and kept tbe andi- 
ence howling as nsual. 

The Cbing Ling Hee Troupe, conjnreta and 
tricksters, dosed tbe bill with a bafliag routine 
of black art stunts, some clever and 
a thriller in which one of the men leaped 
through several knife-edged boopa. This of- 
fering is one of tbe best of its kind that baa 
yet been shown in the small time bonso. 

£. J. B. 

N. V. A. BENEFIT IN 3 THEATKES 

The Metropolitan Opera House has been 
added to the Hippodrome and Manhattan 
Opera House, for theatres in which the 
annual National Vaudeville Artists benefit 
performances will be given on May 13tli. 
This will be the first time that three 
houses will have been used for the benefit, 
and allows for accomniodations of between 
fifteen and twenty thousand people at "N. 
V. A. Benefits" this year. 

With tickets selling at an average price 
of five dollars a scat (prices range from 
three dollars to twenty-five), the N. V. A. 
will probably icoeive almost seventy-five 
thousand dollars from these three benefit 
performances and the procwds of the pro- 
grammes for each. Artists who appear 
at the benefits will jilay each house. ' 

AFRICAN DANCER BOOKQ) . 

Ned Lincoln, Sooth African dancer, ar- 
rived here after^ being 9 months with the 
Pin Wheel Review. He is booked on the 
Keith time by Pat Casey. 

He led the grand march at the Egyptian 
Ball, New York, on April 17 in his native 
costume. 



12 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 25, 1923 




"THE AWKWARD AGE" 

Thtttn— Hamilton. 

StyVb — Musical c&mrdy. 

Time — Twenty-two minutes. 

Settini— FiiW stage (special). 

"Tlie Awkward Age" Is a very enter- 
taining miniature musical comedy, done 
by a cast of two women and a young 
niao, the latter playing the lead. There 
is nothing in the way of an extravagant 
setting, although the latter is a good- 
looking grey "eye," and no fla^ costum- 
ing, for the simple reason that there isn't 
any reason for it One could take this 
same act, put in a chorus of six or eight 
girls for the musical mmibers, give them 
a couple of dances to do, and he'd have a 
corking "big" act However, it is just 
as well that any attempt at makmg this 
a "big" act was avoided, for more than 
probably it wouldn't be half as effective 
as it is. 

The plot concerns a widow with a 
twenty-year-old son, the latter being 
compelled to stilt wear knickers, Eton 
collars and bow ties, owing to the laxX 
that his mother wants to appear young. 
She is being courted by a Senator. The 
son has been sneaking out at night, after 
she has tucked him into bed, and donned 
a tuxedo, to hit the Gay White Way. He 
has a chorus girl for a sweetheart, and 
on this m'ght has invited her «p to the 
house, thinking his mother was going 
out However, the Senator 'phones that 
he is coming,_ so that spoils his plans. 
The choms girl conies, and, after being 
cued by the boy, pretends that she is 
his music teacher. She wants to know 
what the idea of the "Idd!' makeup is, 
and is about to walk out when be tells 
her his mother gets queer ideas at ♦^'w 
and rnnst be humored. They go into the 
"music lesson." follcATing which the boy 
goes off to don his tuxedo, while the 
firl does a very good vocal solo, includ- 
mg some fine wbistltng. Her voice is 
more than pleasing. When he returns, 
he proposes and is accepted, and while 
they are in the midst of a clinch, mother 
enters. He tells her Aey are going to 
be wed, and insists on no longer being 
a Idd. The Senator 'phones from down- 
stairs, and the bqy tells him that he is 
no kid, and before he will allow the 
Senator to see his mother again, he must 
shave his whiskers. The curtain goes 
down as the boy announces that the 
Senator has gone — to the barber shop. 

The boy is a dandy javemle, possess- 
ing appearance, personality and a nice 
singing voice. The girl also works well, 
and the mother holds her end up well. 

G. J. H. 

POWELL AND BROWN 

TbtBtn—Hamaton. 

Stsi»—Sand Pictures. 

Ti nw i N ine minutes. 

Setting — Full stage. 

Powell <md Brown . have one of the 
most pleasing novelties! we've seen in 
vandeviUe in a long time, in the way of 
an opening act This isn't said to place 
them in the category of the opening act, 
for the novelty of their offering, even 
thongfa it runs but nine minutes, and is 
but a "sigjit" act, is good enou^ to bare 
them placed lower on any trill,' and t>e so 
much more effective. 

They call their act "Sumsand." and it 
consists of a series of pictures made 
with various colored sand. -The art pro- 
ductions include "A Bit of Egypt." ''An 
Oriental Sketch." "When Winter 
Comes." "Mount Vesuvius in Eruption at 
Nl^it" and "Doomed." the latter show- 
ins a ship sinking in the ocean, while 
burning. The effect of flames is excel- 
lently done. 

All of the colors are beantiful and all 
the pi e tui e s wonderful from an artistic 
v^^wpoint They hold interest from the 
r"-t to finish and can do so m any 
ho-j3- G. J. H. 



NEW ACTS AND REAPPEARANCES 



VAN DYKE AND VINCt 

Tbestzc— Proctor's 125th Street. 

Stylo — Singing. 

Time — Seventeen minutes. 

Setting— /» "one." 

A singing act well written and ar- 
langed. The man supplied most of die 
singing as welt as some yodeling and the 
girl assisted him to good advantage; The 
place drop in "one" depicts the entrance 
to a cabaret and the bojr at first is in the 
coat room and the girl joins bim, as one 
of the entertainers from the cabaret, after 
the coat boy does a song. The talk that 
follows concerns the new show, etc, for 
the cabaret and he wants, to show her 
scnne of tiis stuff by way' of qualifying 
for a job in the show. 

Tlie roan did another song, with the 
aid of the spotlight revealing a fairly 
good tenor voice. The girl joined him 
after a change of costume and some 
comedy talk followed. As a single, she 
did a jaz2 number finishing with some 
strutting steps. Wliile her voice is not 
all that it migiit be she has a good way 
of putting the numt>ers over. 

Arriving in the garb of a Swiss yodelfer 
he sang a song diat allowed him to yodel 
the chorus, which he did in commendable 
style. They closed singing a published 
number, the man yodeling the patter to 
the second chorus while the pxX sang it 
straight Makes a pleasing smging nov- 
elty for the time the act is playing. 

M. H. S. 



JERRY AND PIANO GIRLS 

Theatre — Franklin, 

Style — Four pianos. 

Time — Eleven minutes. 

Setting — Full stage (special). 

Jerry and Her Piano Girls, as this of- 
fering is billed, is very much similar to 
the turn offered by Nell Woods, with her 
"Melody Charmers," the difference being 
ttiat Jerry lias three girls in addition to 
herself playing piano, and four' pianos 
arc used instead of three. 

Two upright and two' baby grand 
pianos are used by Jerry and tiie three 
girls with her. The routine consists 
mostly of straight quartette piano num- 
t)ers, the only change from this being a 
vocal solo by one of the girls, Jerry 
whistling an accompaniment to the sec- 
ond chorus. 

The four piano idea could t>e made 
into a good act if they had something 
novel in their repertoire, and some tm- 
usually good arrangements. Neither of 
these are present in this act. The girls 
may have good ability to play pianos, 
but beyond the fact that four pianos are 
used, there is nothing out of the ordin- 
ary in this act. At present they'll do 
for the smalt time, and, with a better 
repertoire, and some . novelty connected 
to the arrangements, they'll go in the 
l>ctter houses. G. J. H. 

BEN BOYER 

Theatre— Proctor'f ^jrj Street. 

Stjit— Cycling. 

Time — Twelve minutes. 

Setting— Fu//. 

Boyer is a comedy cyclist, effecting a 
tramp makeup. He rides on in a com- 
edy contraption. It is"ail' improvised 
auto, -with bicycle tires serving as wheels 
and a tieer keg used as the t>ody. Trou- 
ble in getting the machine started again, 
after it stops, furnishes a number of 
comedy situations that are sustained un- 
til the vdiicle blows up and send the 
comic sprawling. 

.Boyer returns with a one-wheel cycle 
and goes through the usual routine of 
difiScult feats, which prove him a past 
master of the cycle. E. J. B. 



MEHAN AND NEWMAN 

Thestxt— Regent. 

Style — Singing and musical. 

Time — Twelve minutes. 

Setting — Special in one. 

Melian and Newman are a man and 
woman team providing twelve minutes of 
corking good entertainment built around 
various little specialties. Mehan opens 
with an announcement that the team are 
atx>ut to do something different — they 
will not use a blue drop, a piano, dance, 
sbg the "blues" or play the ukelele. 
After which the curtain goes up on a 
blue drop with piano and piano lamp and 
Miss Newman puts over "Louisville Lou" 
in fine style. This is in line with the title 
of the act "Broken Promises." They 
follow with a harmonica and ukelele 
duet and then Miss Newman exits while 
Mehan claims to play the uke as if it 
were a Hawaiian guitar. Miss Newman 
imitating the sound of this instrument 
from behind the drop. Mehan plays the 
mouth organ without using his hands, 
dancing at the same time. He is a fine 
eccentric dancer and gets good results. 
Miss Newman has a yodeling specialty 
that goes over successfully and the act 
closes with some fast work by Mehan, 
Miss Newman singing. The act is well 
constructed about the pleasant person- 
alities .of the pair and should tuve no 
trouble finding a place on any bill. 

C. C 



JANS AND WHALAN 

Theatre — Broadway, 
Style — Double comedy. 
Time — Fourteen Minutes. 
Setting—/,, "one." 

Jans and 'Whalan are a pair of clever 
hoys, one_ of whom is a stepper of no 
mean ability and the other a singer and 
good natural comic. The two take a joy 
in their -work that communicates itself to 
the audience and play up a few stock 
gags so that they seem uproariously 
funny. The taller one puts over several 
comedy songs in an individual manner 
and later in the .act sits playing the uke- 
lele with his face framed in an amber 
light from a baby spot while his part- 
ner, on the other side of the sta^e, does 
a clever eccentric dance in a white spot 
to the music furnished by the tall mem- 
ber of the team. All the numbers are 
welt thought out, but put over in a man- 
ner that makes them appear extempo- 
raneous. The act should be able to hold 
its own on any bill and as it is going 
now is strong enough for headline or 
next-to-closing position on most bills. 

C. C. 



NERRET AND MANN 

TheAUt— Proctor's sSlh Street. 

Styl^— JoBgi and talk. 

Time — Fifteen minutes. 

Setting— /n "one." 

This offering is contributed by two 
men,' one doing a nut comic After some 
trivial chatter, which aims to get laughs, 
but falls down mainly t>ecause the gags 
employed have already done veteran 
service in the small time houses, the 
straiglit goes into the t>ailad "For the 
Sake of Auld Lang Syne," with the 
comic popping on for interruptions with 
wise cracks. The comedian follows with 
"I Love Me," with l>oth joining forces 
for "Pm Going Back to Jimbo Jandx) 
Town" for a finish. 

From an audience standpoint the act 
got by in an early spot on the bill here. 
The subject matter, however, is not 
worthy of the talents of its delineators, 
who could really accomplish something 
worth while with a lietter set-np; 

E. J. B. 



JOE FREED, AL HARRISON 
AND CO. 

Theatre— Procfor'f sSth Street. 

Style— Revue. 

Time — Twenty minutes. 

SttOag— Special. 

This offering is an episodical hokum, 
divided in three sections and utilizes a 
cast of five, four men and a girl. 

One of the featured memb^s conies 
on in the opening and sings a verse and 
chorus of a number called "On the Side- 
walks of the City of New York." He is 
costumed as a country bumpkin and the 
song is descriptive of what he has seen 
on his first visit to the big town. 

In the first episode there is enacted a 
comic situation iHrtween a Dutch cop and 
his sergeant. The keystone cop is seen 
running away from a shooting fracas. 
Later the pickpocket runs on and is sub- 
dued by the sergeant While putting the 
bracelets on the crook, the comic discov- 
ers the thief as an old friend and uses 
his influence to have htm_ litwrated. The 
second episode occurs in the subway, 
with the comics using the familiar biir- 
lesque formula, "Let me see you hit him 
again," which, despite its familiarity, 'was 
heartily laughed at by the sinall time 
audience. Another burlesque bit is used 
in the third episode, which is laid in a 
fashionable cabaret, with the thirsty hos- 
tess taking the "hick" for whatever 
dough the proprietor has overlooked in 
compiling the check. 

From all angles, the piece is broad 
burlesque, but manages to have the right 
brand of "hole" that will hit the right 
spot with the audiences of the family 
time circuits. Perhaps the act was pur- 
posely framed for this; if it was, it has 
more than served its purpose. E. J. B. 

KEE TOW FOUR 

Theatie—Proc/ar'j 23rd Street. 

Style— Quartet. 

Time — Fifteen minutes 

Setting.— Special. 

This is the regulation male quartette 
who have submerged their identity in 
their billing and further carry out the 
scheme of camouflaging themselves in 
Chinese makeup and costume. 

They open vrith a chorus of "Blinky 
Qiinatown" and remain on for "Way 
Down East in Maine." They follow 
with an impression of a street comer 
quartette rendering "Roll Them Bones," 
all of which got over for top value in- 
asmuch as the men have both splendid 
singing voices. 

The tenor follows with a solo, "You 
Know You Belong to Somebody Else," 
with Ihe other three harmonizing on the 
second chorus. A Chinese comedy num- 
ber, "'Very Merry Fields of ■China" and 
"Lovin* Sam" rounded out their series. 

The Oriental setup lends color to the 
offering and if anything enhances the 
chances of the act. It is something dif- 
ferent in the way of quartette acts and 
will undoubtedly find favor with the 
small time audiences. E. J-. B. 

FURMAN AND EVANS 

Thettxe— Jefferson. 
Style — Singing. 
Tiiae — Fourteen Minutes. 
Setting—/,, "one." 

The man and girl stroll out and open 
with a Dixie song. Their voices are 
good and style pleasing. The second 
num)>er was a published comedy song, 
the man accompanying the girl at the 
piano. As a single, ' an Irish novelty 
song was done by the man at the piano 
and when the girl returned after a 
change of costume they did a special 
number in the way of a medley of tunes 
of various material dealing with married 
life, etc Makes a pleasing offering of 
its kind for the second spot of the three- 
a-day houses. M. H. S. 



April 25, 1923 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER • 



13 



FouiM k USS Ftank Qm« 
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Telephone Circle 9U2-91U 
WALTER VAUGHAN. EDITOR 



New York, Wednesday, April 25. 1923 



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ADVEKTISINa RATES FURMiaHED ON 
APPLICATION 

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Srdner, N. S^ W., Aaitralia. 



SUNDAY VAVDE. SHOWS 

The Rev. Harry L. Bowlby, of the 
Lord's Day Alliance, his many supporters, 
including a large number of actors, who 
are waging a vigorous campaign to close 
all shows on Sunday would do well to 
give a little careful -thought to the vaude- 
ville situation, especially in large cities. 

The big centers like New York give 
Sunday vaudeville shows in many theatres 
which on week nights are devoted to plays 
and musical shows. These vaudeville en- 
tertainments give employment to scores of 
actors, many of whom have been out of 
work during the week and the Sunday en- 
gagement furnishes means to cany them 
saiely over the week instead of forcing 
them to run into debt for actual living 
empense or cut into the little nest egg saved 
for the enforced Summer layoff. 

At present it is well known that there 
is a big oversupply of actors, and as long 
as this condition exists there will be 
nnemployment among even good actors 
and actresses. _ To these the Sunday 
show is a blessing and the overzealous 
people who are trying so hard to close all 
the theatres would do well to stop and 
think that with the closing of the houses 
innumerable performers will lose the op- 
portunity to earn some much needed 
money. 

The necessity of some clean sort of en- 
tertainment for the thousands of visitors 
to the city who are' forced to remain over 
Sunday is another matter which the agita- 
tors would do welt to consider. The 
great majority of all shows are clean and 
little in them could be called objectionable 
on the Lord's Day and as for vaudeville, it 
is one hundred per cent dean. 



"BLUE LAW" BOX SHELVED 

Chicago, April 21. — The proposed "Blue 
Law" bill that was recently introduced by 
Senator MacMurray of Chicago, at 
Springfield, 111., is now dead. MacMnr- 
ray who introduced the bill asked to with- . 
draw it from the committee and moved 
that it be laid on the table. This was 
done without coimnent. 



BIG SHIFT IN BROADWAY SHOWS 

A big shift in Broadway shows took 
pl^ce on Monday night of this week. 
"Sally, Irtne and Maiy," left the Forty- 
Fourth Street Theatre and went up to the 
Century. "Papa Joe," the Princess The- 
atre piece which at first looked like a flop 
but has developed into a success moved to 
the Lyric. "The Adding Machine," the 
Guild play journeyed from the Garrick to 
the Comedy malang room for the new 
show "The Devil's Disdple," "Uptown 
West," a matinee attraction at the Earl 
Carroll Theatre became a regular night 
attraction and opened on Mon<&y night at 
the . Bijou, replacing "The Love Habit" 
which left that house and went down to 
the Princess. 

Four shows closed on Saturday night, 
"The Lady in Ermine" leaving the Cen- 
tury, and "Liza" ended its run at the Nora 
Bayes. Both these attractions will go on 
the road. "The Dice of the Gods.'' the 
Mrs. Fiske play at the Natiooal, and 
"Roger Bloomer" at the Greenwich Vil- 
lage took the storehouse route. 

Several productions will close for the 
season on Saturday night of chis wedc 
"Better Times" at the Hippodrome ends 
its season and "Anathema" will end its 
short en^gement at the Forty-Eighth. 
Others will doubtless call the season ended 
at other houses, the number and names 
depending almost entirely on the weather. 



"GREATER THAN LAW" NEW SHOW 

The Melboume-Arden Productions, Inc., 
have readjusted their plans and have se- 
lected for the first production a gripping 
drama, "Greater Than Law," an adapta- 
tion of a Swedish play by Hans Allin, 
which ran for three years in Sweden. The 
American adaptation has been made by 
Arvid Paulsan, who will also be featured 
in the cast of the piece. 

This play wilt be shortly placed in re- 
hearsal and will take precedence over the 
firm's proposed production of "In the Bal- 
ance," which had been previously an- 
nounced as their first production. 

The controversy anent the title of a 
musical play to be produced tiy the same 
firm for a summer run, which had been 
titled "My Gal Sal," has been readjusted 
by the management, retitling their piece 
and now calling it "Sal's My Gal." This 
piece is now being cast and will open out 
of town sometime in -May, coming to 
Broadway later for a summer run. 



BANKER WINS DRAMA PRIZE 

Chicago, April 23.— A New York 
banker, JRichard A. Purdy, has won the 
$3,000 prize offered by . the Chautauqua 
Drama Board for the best native Amer- 
ican play, Paul M. Pearson, Secretary of 
the board, announced tonight. The play, 
'grossed Wires," will be produced simul- 
taneously on thirtir Chautaoqua ctrcnits. 

Mr. Purdy, ttoo is Secretary of the 
Hudson Trust Company, -also is a -play- 
wright and poet. His play was one of 340 
submitted to the Chautauqua so Aat they 
might l>e able to produce an original woilc. 
It was selected by a jury of playwrights 
and producers for a "tryout," produced 
near Chicago for a week and found wor- 
thy. 

Mr. Purdy is a member of the American 
Society of Dramatic Authors, and of the 
Actors Equity Association, and is a 
Shakespearean lecturer and reader. ■ 



CUNE TO DO A PLAY 

Louis Cline's advent into the producing 
field will be made at Norwaltc, Conn., April 
26, with Ethel Qifton's play, "For Value 
Received." After the Norwalk perfor- 
mance, two days will be spent in Stam- 
ford, after which the attraction will be 
readied for a New York showing. Aug- 
ustine Duncan, who is directing the stag- 
ing of the play, will head the cast, which 
includes: Maude Haimeford, Remey Car- 
pen, Edward Wever, Cecil Owen, Harry 
Blackmore and May Hopkins. 



"FIRST THRILL'' FOR MONTAUK 

George LefBer's production "The First 
Thrill," which opened at the Apollo The- 
atre, Atlantic Gty. last Monday night, will 
be seen next week at the Montauk The- 
atre, Brooklyn. 



Answers to Queries 



S. B. — Con Riordan, sparring partner of 
Bob Fitzsimmons died from the result of 
injuries sustained by a blow on the chin, 
which he received from Fitzsimmons in 
an exhibition bout given at Jacobs' Opera 
House, Syracuse, N. Y. 



Roll— Jack McAuliffe and Owen Zie^- 
ter boxed three rounds in the Atlanbc 
.^thletic Oub's Arena at Cboey Island, N. 
Y., to a draw. McAuliffe's hand had been 
broken during the bout, and the police 
stopped it in the third round. 



Gef — Victor Herbert composed the 
music for "Prince Ananias," which was 
produced at the Broadway Theatre, New 
York, by the Bostonians. 



M. O. — "Jacinta" was produced by the 
Louise Beaudet Opera Bonffe Co. Sig. 
Perugin! was cast as Morrclos. 



Film — Hobart Bosworth was with the 
Daly Theatre Stock Co. Ada Rehan. 
Henry £. Dixey, Percy Haswell, James 
Lewis, and Campbell Gollan were also 
among the cast, when they played "The 
Twelfth Ni^L" 



C. A. — "Mme. Sans Gene" was pro- 
duced at the Albangfa Opera House, 
Washington, D. C, with Augiutus Cook as 
Napoleoa; James K. Hackett as De Neip- 
perg ; and Kathryn Kidder as the Madame. 



25 YEARS AGO 

"He Cerfny Was Good to Me" was pub- 
lished by Wm. Idling and sung by May 
Irwin, Ldzie B. RaymMid, Belle Davis, John 
W. Ransome, Maude Raymond and A. B. 
Sloane. 



Margaret Dale was with the Henry Mi(- 
ler Co. 



The bill at the Or^ieum, San Fraa> 
dsco, included Lizzie B. Raymond, Reno 
and Richards, Tony Wilson, Robetta and 
Doretto, Smitb O'Brien, Fish and QuigK, 
Montgoinery and Stone. John W. West 
and Kemer's Living Pictures. 



Richard Mansfield presented "The First 
Violin" at the Garden Theatre, New York. 



"His Hooor, the Mayor," was presented 
by Wm. H. Crane at the Empire, New 
York 



The Mordannt & Block Stock Co. at the 
Colmnbus Theatre^ New York, included 
Edwin Arden, E. L. Davenport, Basil 
West, Frank' Mordaimt, 'Marion Abbott, 
Una Abell,Xydia.KiKitL 



The Bamom & Bailey Show was tour- 
ing in Englaiid. 



Tony Smith, the booking agent, died at 
Fordham, New York City. 



Nicholas E. Young was president of the 
National League and AnKricaa Baseball 
Association. 



ACTRESS DEMANDS ACCOUNTING 
June Avis Evans, actress, intends to de- 
mand a compulsory accounting by the 
executors of the estate of the late Dan R. 
Hanna of Oeveland, so that she can press 
her claim for a monthly allowance of $1,250 
which she claims Mr. Hamia pronnsed to 
her, it became known in Surrogate George 
A. Slater's court at AVhite Plains last we^ 
According to Miss Evans, Hamia had 
promised to pay her $151)00 . a year as 
long as she lived in considcntioa of ber 
breaking off her enfageoeot to him. She 
has presented a daun for fl7J0O due on 
the allowance. Wheo fte dun came up 
last wedc, it was adjoonied. by Snmgite 
Slater for two weeks, as it was eoatended 
that the exe uitois had not been property 
served. 



Rialto Ratdes 



AND AN UPPER TOOl 

Little Billy denies that he is the midget 
who recently drank a k>t of strong come 
before going to steep on a lailraad train, 
and then walked up and down his berth 
all night. 

NOW IS THE TUME 

All right fellers. It's.O. K. to rdiasb 
your '*Daylight Savings" gags beginninK 
this week. 

NO, THAT'S THEIR PLEASURE 

This campaign against Sunday shows 
might be all well and good, but isn't then 
any penalty for these reformers who work 
harder on Stmday than any other day to 
enforce "blue laws"? 

ONE WAY TO GET MONEY 

German grand opera as presented m 
Berlin is expensive to Americana and other 
visitors from foreign countries that visit 
the Berlin Opera House. Germaiu can 
hear the classics at one-fifth the price 
charged foreigners. 



LITTLE TO LAUGH AT 

In China laughing is considered effemi- 
nate, but then the Chinese have .little to 
laugh at, anyway. 

SEND THEM SKINNY ONES 

.\t a meeting held recently in one of the 
New York churches, the' subject of Can- 
nibalism in South Africa came upi As 
one means of preventing it, an old deacon 
arose and suggested that the church send 
cnly skinny missionaries. 



MAI«AGER KNEW . HIS BUSINESS 

Jack Warren asked the manager of a 
Middle West theatre recentlv. whether 
singers ever had any trouble with the acoiB- 
tics when playing his house." 

"None whatever," answered the manager. 
"The moment aqy of those fresh guys start 
anything in the finery we give him the 
rush qnidc" 

VAUDEVILLE HYaiERY 

What has become of the kag list of 
actors that had two and three year routes 
booked? 



THEATRICAL CONTRADICnONS 

Roscoe Ails, after a tour of the Orpbeum 
Circuit, is enjoying the best of nealth. 

Marcus Loew — pays hi^ saIaric»^-some- 
times. 



NUISANCE 

A nuisance ia a vaudevillc actor that in- 
sists upon talking continually about his act 
when you want to taOc about your owil 



THE HEIGHT OF NOTHING 

A vaudeville actor just in from the West 
was scoi in front of the Palace Tbeatie 
one day last week in a bran new flivver 
with his monogram and a ooat of anna 
emblazoned on the door. 

WHY MANAGERS DIE YOUNG 

The Regent did a big business last wedc. 
and on Saturday nigfat there was a sell- 
out. Whfle Harrv rtdeiman, the manager 
was standing in the lobby, a little Hdtreir 
gentleman rushed up to hmi and ^riajmii 
exdtedly: 

"Say — ^What kind of monkey business b 
this? I bought a ticket in the standing 
room, and I can't find a seat," 

THOUGHT IT MEANT MONEY 

One of the song publishers last weA 
reedved a tdegtam via Western Unioa on 
which was attached a sticker wUch Mated 
that when money was to be sent it should 
be d«ie. via Weatem Union and the xost 
of aeaiBBg $100 was %iS8.. Tbe tdcgnm, 
which was fiorn a Western song ^shoji 
readt "Send iiiinif dMlcty cob liiiiMliad gOL 
to see manunL 



,14 



THE NEW. YORK CLIKPER 



April 25, 1923 



"WITHIN FOUR WALLS" 
DULL IN SPOTS BUT 
RATHER ENTERTAINING 



-WITHIN FOUR WALLS," a com- 
edy-draou in two acta and nine scenes, 
by Glen MacDonotigii. Produced at the 
Selwyc Thatrc. Tuesdaj c^axnn, April 
17. 

CAST 

Clancy Waller Lawrence 

Gcrrit Minuit Lcunard -Doyle 

Asnen Meade Anne Morruon 

Delphine \ 

Hester Van Dan \ Helen Ware 

Sally Haynes J 

Vartc/oa B'jbcrdinate cbaracten gro-jpcd 
.ia two leparate -sets of characters; played 
by the following: 

John Keefe. Wamei Anderson, Violet 
l>imo^ Dorian ^Anderson,. Florence Gerald, 
Sherman Wade. Cugexie^ HacGrcvor, Clay 
Carroll, Marie Benia.' Leonard Doyle. 
John Feralock, Nancy Xjet, 



A little bit of eretythiog is incorpor- 
ated in "Within Four WalU," comedy, 
drama, oelodraoB, some good and some 
bad, with the good in the lead, ereryduDg 
considered.- The acting of Heico Ware 
and Anse Moirison stood out above any- 
thing else of merit in the Various 
mechanics invented in the movies are used 
in the piece especially the "cut back." . 

The action starts with a scene in 1923 
and goes back to 1820 and touches other 
periods in between. Gerrit Minuit, a fail- 
ure, is reading some old papers conceniing 
his ancestors wbo be blames for his fail- 
UT^ being that their faults have been re- 
flected in himself etc His former sweet- 
heart is with him and she nrtces him to 
' foiget his forefathers and go out and 
■home. - ' 

: A "cut back?' to «'A Spring Day in 
'1820," is the next scenfi Old John Minu- 
it has retnmed home, apparently to die 
after his strennooa- adventores in darkest 
-Africa, dealing in slavcK ■ The old man's 
coasdence bothers him' because he has 
'^mordered a boy. A tropical fever has him 
'on his last legs ami a nnrie- akiUed in the 
treatment of the disease^ an octoroon, b 
bron^t to nurse him. The' next devel- 
opment handed die play a. knockout from 
which it never fully., recovered. It - de- 
'vdopB 4Bt the norse is i ^' veii ged when she 
'tdls the dying man that 'she is his former 
'mistress ajid ttet the boy he has killed is 
bis own son. 

Subsequent scenes' had some farce^om- 
edy and crther things. One' "Scene "con- 
cerned a flirtatious hu%band and ..a con- 
:tented wife who was^ b^jnpingntp- grow 
tired of her existeritge . as soch. - The final 
scoie was on the litUe old New York order 
and a cheap melodrama, probably based on 
one of the fomous shootings of a few gen- 
'eraiions ago, was poorly acted and staged' 
°jnst as bad. 

Few in the cast did well with thdr re- 
'spective parts. Anne Morrison revealing 
herself as an excellent comedienne, and 
Hden Ware did very well with her parts, 
missing on one occasion which may have 
.been no fault of 'hers. ;In spots the' play 
shows signs of good staging and costum- 
ing, but on the whole, is a terrible conglo- 
-mecation of faulty acting and writing, 
i A "n"*^^ of the. old song .hits of a 
score or more years ago were plaj^d dur- 
ing the piece, among .'them being "Rosie 
CGiady.'' "After the BaU," "The Side- 
walks of New York," and others -which a 
large portion of the audience remembered 
wen enong^ to ham. 

Re-arranged, the "Fotir Walls" would 
idoiditless ^ a better entertainment. ' 

: ^ IIEW:'NA>iE tokJ*frVB. ;9lviBeV^ ;; 

■ 'WloChell fSfnlth tah' u) i iJj)i e ti e d litwiHIug 
-aie scoMid att of •^i'^HVeO? 'iMiatim. 

early in Jime otit of town.' 



SHAKESPEARE IN STOCK 

The stock companies seem to be taking 
up the Shakespearian craze as well as 
Broadway. 

The New Bedford Players, of New Bed- 
ford, Mass., staged a revival of "The 
Merchant of Venice" last week, with Ed- 
ward Waldmann especially engaged for the 
role of Shylock. The local papers were 
. loud !n their praise of WaMmann's per- 
formance and from all accounts the produc- 
tion enpoyed a prosperous week. 

Several other stock companies are now 
planning to revive "The Merchant," with 
a prominent player as guest star to play 
Slqrlbdc as ' 'W'aldmann did in New Bed- 
ford. 



EASTERN SHOWS FOR COAST 

San Fkancisoo,' April 23. — Mclntyre 
and Heath will open with "Red Pepper" at 
the Sbubert-Corran theatre on Monday, 
April 29. They will be foltowed into the 
; bouse by "ShufOe Along" the colored show 
which is now wending its way westward. 



"HOW COME" FASTEST 
DANCING SHOW OF 
THE WHOLE SEASON 



"HOW COHE," ■ giily mostcal dark- 
medy, score by Ben Harris, book by 
Eddie Hontcr, additional jiombcrs by 
Henry- Creamer and Will Vodery- I*ro- 
duecd at the Apollo Theatre. Ifodday 
evening, April 16, - ^ 

CAST 

Deaccn Lmg Tack Andrew Fairchild 

Sarah Green Amanda Craig 

Erother Wire Nail Leroy Brobmfield 

Didores Lcve Nina Hunter 

Suter Dcolittle *.'.'..". Hilar? Friend 

Cbcneser Green ••.**.....,. Anm Davis . 

Brother Ham Alec Lovejor ' 

A. SD\art Chappy Ch^ppelle 

Malinda Green .Juanita- Stinnctte 

Rnfos WIk : Cco^ W. Cooper 

Rastus Skunkton Lime. ...Eddie Biioter' 

Dandy Dan '. .'.:G^ee C Lane 

Ophelia Sdow . . .Andrew TrihUe 

- Smilinff San. , / -. Billy ' HiftBins 

Otcther Low- Dcwn James Dingbat' 

Sister Wbale.'; .Octavia Sawder 



If "Shuffle Along" or "Strut Mi^ Liz- 
zie" left any step undanced, that oversight 
..was Temedied 'IV' the more or less, dark- 
isldiined "muncal darkdmedy" "How 
.Come," .«hich,J^e||i tfoWii.a^ &e Apollo 
last -Holiday mgfat." Doiibd^js; there were 
never 's6' many fljwig; fef|t..'9n' any stage 
not of &e super hippodrome class. From 
the standpoint, of .th^ libretto the show 
niay be'attenuated,'btit it is'thick 'with legs 
and its footage is incredible. 

"How Come" employs almost all of the 
nimble high kickers -who' 'were seen a year 
or so ago at Daly's Sixty-third Street 
Theatre, and since that time in the cabaret 
belt Its jaz2y score is the work of Ben 
•Harris and Henry Creamer and Will Vo- 
dery, 'who ilid "Strut Miss Lizie" and 
other negroid musical entertainment 

There is a racy chorus that executes be- 
wildeniig rushes from the wings and is not 
noticeably 'oicundiered with- inhibitions. 
"The leading' ' comedian, Eddie Hunter, 
'Woi-ks somewKat after the Bert. Williams 
style but lades the 'finish and ability of the 
late artist 

AlAougb' considerably lightweight on 
'comedy. How Cbine". b one of the fastest 
-nmsical shows Broadway has glimpsed 
since "Shuffle Along." Had "How Come" 
been the first 'pf the colored cast shows to 
t^ch'Broadlvay ifs Success tvould doubt- 
less h^e .b^= fidbdark^lit, but following 
■io ttany loses, the. ii^v*elty 'app^ aqd 
UtaA'tii^i^cft're fttabd. on -its -own '.merits. 
- ='Th'ei« vHt sbm goiad' soilKs In the score 
anil tbii ord^festrai foqliKtM' •bjr'^l Vo- 
'dcky. gi^ -them as' well'a»''th« faltrbmen- 
tal portion, a tcally fine interpretatioar- 



"DEVIL'S DISCIPLE," 
SHAW REVIVAL, 

AT THE GARRICK 



■THF, DEVIL'S DISCliPLE." a melo- 
drajna by Itcraard Shaw, presented at the 
Garrick Theatre bir the Theatre Guild on 
Monday evening, April 23, 1932. 

CAST 

Mrs. Annie PrimrL-ee Dudgeon, 

Beverly Sitgraves' 

F.ssic Martba-Brran Allen 

ChriMy Gerald Hamer 

.•\nthony Anderjpn Moffat Johnston 

Judith Anderson -Lotus Robb 

' Law.ver Hawkitis ..Alan MacAteer 

WilliaiD Dudgeon Bryan Russell 

Mrs. William Dudgeon. .Kathe'ryn Wilson 
Titus Dudgeon Lawrouc' Cecil 

' Mrs. Titus Dudgeon Maude Ainslie 

Richard Dudgeon Basil Sydney' 

The Serfienol Lawrence Cecil 

Majce- Swindfn Reginald Goode 

General Durpcyne Roland Young 

Mr.. Bnidenell Bryan Russell 



When Shaw wrote "The Devil's Dis- 
dple" he bad not yet become truly Shavian 
• and only here and there gave the promise of 
the keen satire that was to bring him fame 
later in his career. But the play is still a 
Shaw play, and it docs contain a great 
deal of ^e real Shaw spirit, nicely mould- 
ed and served in a melodiama that is, at 
times, as gripping as old "ten, twenty, 
thirty" shows which we viewed from the 
peanut ^llery on die . shoemaker's "bill- 
boaitls" m the days of our early youth. 

The time of the story is during the early 
-days of the American -Revolution 'and Dick 
-Dudgeon, who has the misfortune, to be a 
liberal thinker set amid' the Puritan re- 
strictions of a New Hampshire town, 
startles his neighbors' by telling them that 
,he is .a disciple of the' devjl; ',e*tcrilnig the 
•many virtues of his Satanic 'inaiesty and 
:avpwin^ that he knew fro«n the first that 
'the Prmce of Darkness !w^s his natural 
-liiaster and captain /'and friend.^ Kck hAs 
'just inherited the old home and, in . effect . 
states that' he will turn it into a 'temple of 
Diabolonianism, where everything shall be 
happy and carefree, with fear abolished and 
jio tears shed. Later in the play ' we see 
.'Dick Dudgeon, mistaken by the British 
troops for the husband of the lady with 
whom he is having tea, led to the allows 
-unprotesting, to be hung for the crime of 
which the lady's husband, a Presbyterian 
^minister who is under suspicion, is accf^ed. 
Of (Miurse he escapes' the death penalty 'as 
the dust-covered minister rides up at the 
last . minute with the papers establishing'Iiis 
own, innocence. 

PKiUp Moeller, who staged the prodtic- 
tion, has made a fine job of it and Lee Si- 
m'onson has devised some great period cos- 
tumes and stage settings. 
.. Thb play was last seen in New York 
'about 1897 with Richard Mansfield in . the 
leading^ role. - It . is • fairly safe to say that 
'averaging, the general excellence of the 
cast in the present production with that of 
Mansfield and his supporting company, and 
discounting the glamour that time has im- 
parted to some of the liaines in the Mans- 
field production, the present play sets a 
higher standard. It is difficult' to pick out 
any of the lesser characters for their good 
work, -for those who had relatively un- 
important parts did their work as credit- 
ably as those who' played the leads. Basil 
-Sydney, as the_ swaggering Dick Dudgeon, 
gave a splendid performance as also did 
Miss Lotus Robb as the parson's wife. But 
a role that was filled wiA realism and 
made somediing to .wonder at was that of 
Genera] ' Bnrgoyne^ - played by ' Roland 
Yotmg ■with -a fine distinction . and tech- 
nique that was a joy to behold. 

LITTLE NLLY FOR AUSTRALIA 

; Little Billy, w,ho has just' completed a 
tour of the'Orph'eum Grcuit,.'will sail from 
San Francisco oh Jime 1.5 for. a twenty- 
wedc engagement in Australia. ■' 



"BERANCER" AT COMEDY 

The Harvard Dramatic Oub presented 
Sacha Guitry's "Beranger" on Thursday 
evening, April 19, at the Comedy Theatre, 
as the second bill of their week's program. 
The .play is replete with allusions to 

. Napoleon, Louis XVIII and other mem- 
bers of the royal family of that period,']and 
concerns '-Beranger," who composed' sonigs, 
particularly one which worked its way into 
the heart of France during the trying times 
of the revolution. Three' episodes in the 
life of Beranger are taken by Guitry for 

' His material for the play, the details for the 
most part being uninteresting to the aver- 
age American theatre-goer 'whose thirst for 

:Frendi history is limited. However, the 
best scene is reserved for the last The- 
old song writer returns to the scenes of his 
youth, and hoping to cheer him the town's 
peorple-strikeiup a famous tune, where.'npon 
Beranger says the song is not his, and 
alludes to fame in- cynical manner. 
. The company does some fair work. John 
Collier played the part of Beranger, which 
proved to 6e real difficult Dorothy Goog- 
ins, in ithe- leading feminine role, was pleas- 
ing and displayed- fiiie- stage presence. 
Probably the b^f individual performance 
was given by Conrad Salmger, who 
portrayed a Talleyrand of considerable 
merit .- -- 



SOTHERN-MARLOWE FLAMS 

After a season of inactivity, the greater 

rt of which was spent touring abroad, 
H. Sodiem and Julia Marlowe are plan- 
ning to return to the stage next season, 
Xhey'\will ' again sail 'under -the Sfaubert ' 
Ibaiiner and will offer a repertoire of plays. 
:Among the plays which they will do wHl 
be /^r^rmbeline," which has not been oo die 
Aiiierican stage in many years. The. re- 
mainder of their repertoire will include 
"Hamlet." "Twelfth Night," "The Mer- 
chant of 'Venice," "The Taming of the 
Shrew," "As You Like It," "Much Ado 
About Nothing,"- "Macbeth,?' "Anthony 
-and Cleopatra" -and "Romeo and Juliet" 
" Miss Marlowe, in accordance with her 
custom of acting only in alternate seasons, 
■will not appear the season after next but 
-it- is announced that 'Mr. Sothem will be 
seen at that time tmder the 'direction of 
Lee Shubert in three new plays.: "Two of 
these plays are entirely new to the Ameri- 
can stage and the third is a revival of a 
success of the past. 

Miss Marlowe and Mr. Sothem' will -sail 
for. England on May I and expect to en- 
'gage players and prepare costumes for their 
productions during their stay abroad. ' 



: THEATRES JOURNEY ON MAY 7 

The Great Neck Players.. of Great Neck, 
L. I., and the Alliance ' Players, of Jersey 
City, are the latest groups to enter the 
Little Theatre Tournament, which will be 
conducted with the co-operation of the 
New York Drama League and which will 
open at the' Bayes Theatre on Monday, 
May 7. The event will run throughout toe 
week and will provide each group an op- 
porttmity to display their best talent. 



"nRST THRILL" IN BROOKLYN 

"The First Thrill," a comedy by Beulah 
Poynter which George LelBer is sponsor- 
ing at the Montaidc Theatre, Brooklyn, 
this week, will conclude its season of two 
weeks on Saturday night The play will 
be rewritten and the attraction proiduced 
again by Leffler in the fall. 



REVELERS START ON SATURDAY 

.The. Revelers, an organization recently 
organized along die lines of the Sixty 
Club with its membership limited to' peo- 
ple, in the theatrical' prof essioh, will 'have 
lis. first affair de^ibed as a"Vanity Fair'? 
at the Ritz <^fton Hotel on 'Saturdav 
night . This will be the ' bee;innirig of -a 
series of bi-wedcly events that wiircontiOiie 
through the summel'. " 



April 25, 192a 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



IS 



SbeOa Teoy and Roy Scdiey will open 
in vaudeville shortly. 



Harry Ellis and Joe Parsons are doing 
a new act called "Listen Joe." 

The Shddon Sisters will begin a tour 
of the eastern theatres this week. 



Josephine Kay is now hostess at the 
Bluebird ballroom in New York city. 



Dolly Wilson opened with a new 
single offering, assisted by a pianist, this 
week. 

Alpha and Delta Crane opened for a 
tour of the Keith' Eastern houses this 
week. 



Richard Pitman has replaced Frazer 
Coulter in "Secrets," at the Fulton 
Theatre. 



Ben Marks is breaking in a new single 
act, and also a Hudson coupe- at the 
same time. 



William Grinnell has been engaged as 
stage director for the Ed. Wynn show, 
next season. 



Marguerite Marsh, the moving pic- 
ture star, wDl appear in vaudeville with 
Will Morrisey. 

Florence Madeira is appearing in the 
"Gingham Girl" in the role created by 
Lora Sonderson. 



Marshall Montgomery, the ventrilo- 
quist, has been given a full route over 
the Loew Circuit. 



Mflton Wallace has been added to 
the cast of "Abie's Irish Rose" at the 
Republic Theatre. 



Jimm^ Nugent and Gus Hibbert are 
rehearsmg a new blackface singing act 
for the Keith circuit. 



Loga M^rm is preparing a new "flash" 
act in which she will be supported by 
an dght piece band. 

Jason and Harrigan showed their new 
singing and dancing act at the Cosmos, 
Washmgton, last week. 

The Wainwri^t Sisters have re- 
turned to New York and will be seen 
soon in a new production. 



Phyllis Gilmore. has been engaged as 
leading woman for the F. F. Proctor 
stock company of Albany. 

Edward Wade and John Clayton have 
been engaged by E. K. Nadel to appear 
in vaudeville in his new act. 



Kate Melini has assembled a new girl 
act which will shortly invade vaudei^e 
as the Five Normany Girls. 

Eddie Bnzzell of "The Gingham Girl" 
will at the close of his engagement with 
the show go into vaudeville. 



Helen Staples, "The Prima Donna 
Petite," vKill open for a tonr of the In- 
terstate circuit on April 29tfa. 

Clair Rossi, the Corey Sisters and 
Anna Balthy are appearing in the new . 
revue at the Sahara Restaurant 



Grace Hayle, Elinor McCnne and Lyle 
Clement joined the Dan Michalove At- 
lanta Stock Company last week. 

Joseph Byron Totten is organizing a 
stock company for the Lyceum Theatre, 
Columbus for the summer months. 



Murray and Allen are rehearsing a 
new singing act which will shortly be 
seen in the local vaudeville houses. 

Jack Labodi, Richard LaSalle and 
Dean Cole have been signed by Jules 
Hurtig for his Dayton Stock Company. 



ABOUT TOU! AND TOU!! AND TOU!!! 



Elsie Janis has been engaged to ap- 
pear in a revue at the Casino Theatre, 
Paris, in 1924. 



Leo J. LaBIanc has been engaged to 
stage the new Fashion Show at Proc- 
tor's Theatre, Newark. 



Carter, the Magician, arrived from 
Australia, where he has been for the 
past two years. 

Donald Duff is understudying the 
principal role in "Roger Bloomer" play- 
ing at the Greenwich Village Theatre. 

Pauline Travera, an English male- 
impersonator, ^rrived in New York last 
week and will play the Keith time here. 

The DoUy Sisters have been visiting 
Budapest, Hungary, for the past few 
weeks, that city being their home town. 

Walter WincheU retnmed from Los 
Angeles to Broadway after an absence 
of two weeks, arriving here on Sunday. 



Harry Kellar is doing the advance 
work for the Dixieland Jazz Band, 
which is. playing dance dates on tour. 

Mia Lubovlia, premier danseuse, has 
joined Harry DownSng's act. and will 
tour, the Pantages circuit with that act, 
opening in Chicago next week. 

Maude Hanaford has been signed for 
the leading role in Ethel Clifton's new 
play, "For Value Received," to be pro- 
duced by Louis Cline. 

Dorinda Adams has been signed as 
featured dancer with "Adrienne," the 
new musical comedy to be produced by 
Louis Werba. 



Charles Caliill Wilson will retire from 
the Alhambra Flayers at the Alhambra 
Theatre. Brooklyn, this week to begin 
rehearsals for a production. 



RitcUe Rnssdl and George Amesbnry 
have been added to the roster of thi 
Union Square Stock Company, Pitts- 
field, Mass. 



Xicwla and English joined Robert 
LindeVs revue, "Melody Land." last 
week, placed through the Harry Walker 
booking office. 

Bniy Ked" Grant and Ruth Adair 
Adair have been engaged for the Wil- 
liam B. Friedlander unit that opens on 
May 14 on the Pan Time. 



Avlda Hudson has been engaged as 
'leading lady for Loew'S Alhambra 
Stock Company, Brooklyn, opening on 
April 30th with "Lawful Larceny." 



Millie Freeman has been specially en- 
gaged by James Thatcher for the role 
of Grandma in the S. Z. Poli Stock 
production of "Why Men Leave Home." 



Ira Lamotte has succeeded Duke 
Fosse as manager of the Belasco Thea- 
tre, Washington, the latter having left 
for his annual holiday in California. 



Newhoff and Phelps have been 
awarded a full route over the Loew Cir- 
cuit, and will open at the Gates, Brook- 
lyn, next week. 



William Finzelle, the Detroit orches- 
tra leader, is in town and is making his 
headquarters at the Harry Walker of- 
fice. 



Parish and Pern have completed their 
extended tour of the Pantages Circuit 
and will.^shortly return to the local vau- 
deville houses. 



Tom Lewis, Dorothy HacKaye and 
Ray Raymond have been engaged for 
the three leading roles in "Helen of 
Troy, N. Y." 



Lawrence Goldie will again book 
George Robinson's New Brighton 
theatre, which opens on May 14th, this 
year. 

Peggy Davis, former Ziegfeld Follies 
girl, has just completed a picture with 
the Fox company in which she played 
second lead. 



Rose and Shaw have been engaged by 
Manager Harry Federman, of the Re- 
gent Theatre, to stage the Regent Cab- 
aret at that house. 



Nancy Gibbs, the English prima 
donna, has joined the cast of "Jack and 
Jill' at the Globe theatre. She is smg- 
ing'the role of Jill. 

MoSat Johnston will have an impor- 
tant role m the Theatre Guild's forth- 
coming production of 'The Devil's 
Disciple." 

jos^faine Victor is to head the cast 
of "Fires of Spring," which is to be 
produced shortly for a Spring tryout 
by A. H. Woods. 

Sazon KUng has completed a new 
comedy in which Theresa Maxwell 
Connover is to be featured next season. 
The piece is as yet without title. 

James Reynolds, artist, is on the Ac- 
quitania with a commission from Flo 
Ziegfeld, Jr., to obtain several art fea- 
tures for the next edition of the "Fol- 
Kes." 



V/m Rogers, Frank Tfamey and the 
Doners will be seen on the programme 
of the Treasurer's Oub benefit to be 
held Sunday, April 29. at the Hudson 
Theatre. 



Mary Garland, daughter of Hamlin 
Garland, the novelist, will make her 
stage debut in "As Yon Like It," 
scheduled as the first production of the 
National Theatre. 



Johnny Moldoon and Pearl PranUIn 
have discarded their vaudeville act, and 
will begin rehearsals with George M. 
Cohan's new show, "The Rise of Rosie 
O'Reilly" shortly. 



The Dmcan Sisters are being held 
over for a third week at the Orpheum 
Aeftre-in Los Angeles this week, es- 
tabushmg a new record for acts at that 
house. 



Margaret King, stage and screen ac- 
tress, has temporarily retired from the 
stage to become private secretary to H. 
M. Arden, head of the Melbonme-Ar- 
den Productions. 



Jesse Wefl has been engaged as di- 
rector of pubh'city for the Edward Small 
offices., following J. Harrison Orkow 
who left to start prodndng on his own 
account. 



.OJga Parado, of the vaudeville team 
of Olga and Alan 'Parado, was forced 
to cancel her time on the Delmar Cir- 
cuit because of illness and is now at 
her home in Buffalo, recuperating. 

Beveriy Sitgreaves is the latest ad- 
dition to the cast of "The Devil's Dis- 
ciple, whose leading parts, are taken by 
Basil Sydney, Roland Young, Lotus 
Robb and Mofiat Johnston. 

. Solly Jo3rce, formerly playing the part 
of the teacher in the act ^Vacation 
Days.- is now associated with Jack Hall 
and Jack Hayden in the offering The 
. Three .SfOAtpnJ! a novelty t>resentatlen. 



Georgia O'Ramey, who recently -with- 
drew from "Jack and Jilt," has been 
signed for the chief comedy role in the 
musical version of "My Laily Friends," 
to be launched by H. H. Frazee. 

Lnia Swan, Jocelym De ydboff, 
Johnny Black. Shirley Slw I Ban and 
Dora Dobcry have been hetiKMrer with 
the Harry Walker Revue at tUe Bea^ 
Arts, Philadelphia. 

Kay Hammond and Davis HcABaare 

playing the leads in the Smith-Dnfiy 
stock presentation of "The Gold Dig- 
gers" at the Academy of Mnsie, Bal- 
timore, this week. 



Eddie DowUng was ont of "Sally, 
Irene and Mary" for one night last week 
to attend to his new production, 
"Whistling Tim," which opened in 
Washington. 

Ethd Clifton, author of "For Value 
Received," the play to be produced 
shortly with Augustin Dimcan and 
Maude Hannaford in the leading roles, 
arrived last week from Los Angdes in 
order to be present at the premiere. 

Mabd Wlthec^ last seen on Broadwmy 
in "Lady Butterfly," has been added to 
the cast of "Hal Tabarin," the new mu- 
sical piece in which Harry K. Morton 
and Zella Russell are to be featured by 
the Shubetts. 



Malcolm Willlama and EBfabetb PaN 
tersoo have been signed to appear in 
support of Leo CariUo in "Knnnd 
Blake," the new Booth Tarkington play 
in which he is to be starred under the 
direction of Alfred E. Aarons. 



Richard Ttavera and his wife. Viidet 
Palmer, have gone to Hollywood where 
Travers is to begin work on a contract 
which calls for his bang featured in a 
series of five and seven reel motion pic- 
ture productions. 



Fred Clark of ^he "Lef s Go" com- 
pany, James Harrison and Ann Francis, 
are requested 'to communicate -with 
Henry Chesterfidd, secretarr of Uie Na- 
tional Vaudeville Artists dub en matters 
of importance. 

Dafar, Mac and Daly^ have been 
ronted over the Delmar time and -will 
open the last week in ApriL The act 
was forced to cancel some of their 
Eastern PanUges time due to a fall 
sustained by Miss Daly. 

Frank Kecnon, who has been success- 
fully appearing in "Peter Weston" in 
Chicago was presented with a bronze 
smoking set by the members of his com- 
pany on the sixty-fifth 'anniversary of 
his birthday last wedc 

ChriBtin« Wolbct attempted snidde 
because she failed to get a part in the 
chorus of a Broadway musical ccnn- 
edy. She drank a quantity of iodine in 
front of the Church of Immaculate Con- 
ception, in the Bronx. 



"50 MHes from B^ttvay," "Jost Ont 
of Knicken," Harry Stoddard and Band, 
Crafts ft Haley. Van ft Schenck, Hany 
Fox and Beatrice Cnrtia andvraiiam 
Eba and Co., provided the entertain- 
ment at Keith's Sunday concert at the 
New Amsterdam Theatre. 



Winchdl Smith, producer and play- 
wright, will have a special performance 
of "Polly Preferred," to be given at the 
Little Tlieatre next Sunday, radioed to 
his home in Farmington. Conn., where 
he -will celebrate a birthday. Other fro- 
ducers are expected to be present. 

Bert B. PerUna, director of Exploit- 
ation for -'Metro Pictures was married 
to Edwina Beryl Coit former Dilling- 
ham showgirl Thursday evening. Ailril 
12th. at the home of Rev. Wm. £. Saw- 
yeri pastor of the Mefliodlst Episceoal 
Churdii Eoboken. N^ J-^ . 'r^^ 



16 THE NEW YORK CLIPPER April 25. 1923 




April 25. 1923 THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 17 




April 25, 1923 





PRODUCING MGRS. INVESTIGATING 
VALUE OF BROADCAS TING SHOWS 

P. M. A. ^ipoints Cammittee to Determine Whether or Not The- 
atres Derive Additioiial Patnmage From Radio Service — 
Hammerstein Declares Record and Music Sale Keeps 
Peofrfe Away from the Shows 



At a miTting held last Friday by the 
Producing Managers' Associatioa, a com- 
mittee was appointed to investigate the 
matter of royalties and exploitation possi- 
bilities by radio of masical compositions 
used in their prodnctioos. Arthur Ham- 
merstein is chairman of the committee. 
InteiestiDg developments are promised this 
week by the producers who are yet sure 
whether or not the broadcasting of a play 
<lraws additional patronage. 

As £ar as Arthur Hammerstein, chair- 
man of die committee, is personally con- 
cerned, sheet music and phooograiih rec- 
ords of any of his shows wnl not be 
issoed in the future until he has first tried 
out the value of the radio station as an 
advertiser of his productions. 

Sheet music and phonograph records, ac- 
cording to Mr. Hainmersteui, being avail- 
able at ,any time in the hom^ is apt to 
Iceep people away from the theatre. But 
radio being a transitory operation is more 
likdy to vbct the appetite of those who 
liear it and make them want to hear more 
of the same. 

Lyric writers and composers of the 
-scores of musical plays, as well as music 
publishers, who collect royalties on their 



songs through the American Society of 
Composers, Authors and Publishers for 
the performance for profit of their works, 
are now beginning to collect some royal- 
ties from the radio stations which are 
being won over gradually by the society. 
These members of the society are not in 
favor of the producing manager's plan of 
collecting royalties. For similar reasons 
they are not in favor of the restricting of 
sheet music sales or phonograph records 
whidi is thar biggest item of revenue in 
most cases. Among musical comedy lyric 
and music writers the proposed Hammer- 
stein plan is* far from being in favor and 
in practically every case composers and 
authors can choose their producers. 

Sevpal months ago the producing man- 
agers announced their plan to restrict the 
puyhig in public of the compositions com- 
prising part of their mnsiral comedy 
scores and also wanted to share in the 
dividends of the American Society of Com- 
posers, Authors and Publishers.^ How- . 
ever, up to the present time nothing defi- 
nite has come of it with the exception of 
two or three letters being written by 
counsel for the P. M. A. and the general 
manager of the society, J. C. Rosenthal. 



An» TO- WILTING STAFF 

Following the recent withdrawal of 
Clarke and Leslie from the concern. Stark 
& Cowan, Inc, is leorganizmg its staff of 
writers and also replcqMnng it3. cal^ague 
from teveral . well-loR>wn free °. lance 
writers. ' " 

Among^ tfifi. >^ij|cis - from wImau * soogv 
were taken last^ week by Stark & Cowan, 
Inc.,' are Con Conrad and'Eugne West, 
Bauqt Davis and Harry Akst, Bemie 
Crossman and Willie White, Billy Rose, 
miy Baskett and otibers as well as a tune 
from Isham Jones, well-known orchestra 
man. Sam Coalow, whose Spanish com- 
edy song is now being pinaged by the 
Ixnise, las been signed as a staff writer 
for two years, and u collaborating on some 
nnmbers with Abe Ohlman. 



WARREN WITH CLARICE A LESLIE 

Harry Warren, composer of "Rose of 
the Rio Grande," and formerly connected 
with Stark & Cowan, has beoi added to 
:the staff of Clarke & Leslie. 



BERLIN GOES TO LONDON 

Irving Berlin sailed on Saturday on the 
Majesne fair London. Berlin will super- 
vise the r^earsals of "The Music Box," 
-which win open in London on May 14. 



MAX SILVER WITH ABRAHAMS 

Ma'*' Silver is now connected with the 
ICanrice Abtahams Mnsic Compapy in the 
■capacity of general manager. Silver and 
Abrahams worked together, the former as 
general manager and the latter as head of 
-the ^ofessional department, more than fif- 
teen years ago for F. A. (Kerry) Mills.- 
They were with the same concern for a 
period of ten years imtil about seven years 
ago. , Silver most . recently was irith 
Charles K; Harris. History scems.to r^-. 
veat itself in this respect; fidlowiiiK on tiHc 
'bedbM>f '.tlic'ieaiiion' of. the 'FiAeii;Mc-^ 
Caitiqraiaff at JadE~BfiIIs,.Incl . ' 



LEVY CHANGES NAME TO DAVID 

Benjamin W. Levy, attorney, formerly 
head of the mnsic publishing house of B. D. 
Nice & Co., has returned to the practice of 
law and has become connected with .the 
firm of San, Ittelson & Van Voorhis. By 
leave of court Levy has changed his name 
to that of Benjamin David. 

SIXTY YEARS IN ONE JOB 

E. S. Cragin, manager of the C H. 
Ditson & Co. music store on East Thirty- 
fourth street, last week celebrated his 
seventy-fifth birthday. Sixty years of his 
life has been spent with the Ehtson bouse. 

MUSIC BflEN FOR CONVENTION 

Several band and orchestra men, repre- 
senting New York music publishers, will 
attend the twenty-ninth aimual convention 
of the American Federation of Musicians 
to be held May 15 in St. Louis, Mo. In- 
cluded in- the hanA and orchestra inen who 
are leaving are Lester Santly, of Leo 
Feist, Inc. ; I^eo Lewin, of Waterson, Ber- 
lin & Snyder; Abe Holzmann, of Jerome ' 
H. Remick & Co., and Frank Marvin, of 
Clark-Leslie Songs, Inc. 

SONGWRITERS IN ACT 

Lou Brea'u and Charles Tobias, of the 
Tee Bee Music Company, have been rooted 
over thr Moss time for six weeks, opening 
in Phflklelphia the week of April 23. The 
offering is a singing act and the duo will 
sing their own compositions. The Tee 
Bee's newest addition is a high-class 
ballad written by Tobias, Breau and 
Fred Huff, musical director of the Am- 
bassador "Theatre. 

NEW TRIANGLE SONG 

The Triangle Music Company's song, 
"My Mother's Lullaby," is being released 
shortly as a special' the Okeh Record 
Company, havug been made by Vincent 
Lopez.-and His Orchestra. Lopcz is also 
staging the song as'a featare in hb vaude- 
'rille '-act' : . ■ 



KRESGE BIG INSURANCE PLAN OFF 

The plan of S. S. Kresge to take out a 
life insurance policy amounting 'to $5,- 
000,000 has been blocked by the action of 
the Life Underwriters' Association. The 
proposed Kresge policy, the largest evet 
issued has gone into the discard and the 
head of the five and' ten cent store chain 
has decided to call it all off. Forty insur- 
ance companies were prepared to share in 
the monster policy but the Underwriters' 
Association displayed sufficient strength to 
cause them to refuse to issue it. 

The trouble with the policy was due to 
the fact that its premium and commission 
amounted to more than any on record and 
in round figures was about $150,000. The 
policy payments figured around $300,000 a 
year and the commission for the under- 
writer figured atraut half of the first year's 
premium. 

Wallace Scott, not a regular under- 
writer, but a broker who belongs to the 
N. Y. Stock Exchange firm of W. E. Hut- 
ton & Co., is a friend of Mr. Kresge's and 
be applied for a license permitting him to 
handle the policy. This would insure the 
payment of the big premium to him and 
the Underwriters' Association immediately 
filed its protest James H. Mcintosh, at- 
torney for Mr. Kresge declared that after 
his client had decided to take out the big 
policy, the filing of the jn-otest caused him 
to change his mind and call off the whole 
dnng. "It caused Mr, Kresge too much 
aimoyance," said Mr. Mcintosh and he de- 
aded that if the insurance companies pre- 
ferred to give the agents commissions 
rather than do insurance business, he was 
willing." 

The New York underwriters, led by 
Lawrence Friddy, 120 Broadway, made 
their fight largely in the interest of George 
H. Beach of Detroit, who had been woric- 
ing for years to sell insurance to the chain 
store man. Mr. Beadh had been active in 
selling large instuance to seventeen of- 
ficials and associates of Mr. Kresge. 

Through his o-wn arguments, supple- 
mented 'with those of the holders of some 
of these seventeen policies, Mr. Beach had 
sought to convince Mr. Kresge that he 
needed big life insu^ce to pay estate 
taxes and absorb the fiiock to his interests 
on his death. Mr. KBresge finally decided 
to take out the $5,000,000 policy and was 
examined by six or seven physicians. But 
then he suddenly broke off negotiations 
with Beach and started to deal with Wal- 
lace Scott, who was not in the insurance 
business at all. 

The premium and commission involved 
were greater than any on record. , Two or 
three others have insurance of nearly $5,- 
000,000, but Mr. Kresge is older than any 
of Ae big policyholders were when they 
obtained their insurance. He is .56 years 
old. 

Mr. Beach, questioned by officials of the 
■New York Insurance Department, said 
that Mr. Kresge had at first asked for 
"a wholesale rate" because of the size of 
the policy. Any form of a rd>ate, how- 
ever, is illegal Mr. Kresge a little later 
began to deal -with iiis New York friend, 
but it has been denied that' there 'was any 
understanding on the first premium involv- 
ing a rebate. 

"We have sho-wn Mr. Kresge," said 
Mr. Priddy, "bet w een him and Mr. Scott, 
that if he wants life insurance he must deal 
with life insurance underwriters and that 
he cannot transform a stock broker over- 
night into an underwriter in order to take 
care of a special transaction. 

"Mr. Kresge does not have to deal with 
Mr. Beach, but he does have to deal with 
some regidarly accredited life insurance 
man. Our organization is not a union in 
any sense of the word, but it is a vigilant 
organization in detecting -violatioiis of the 
insurance laws and in demanding that they 
be obeyed. 

iTHr. Kresge has wired to all the insur- 
ance companies to whom he made 4>plica- 
tion in this city, oddng that his applica- 
'tibti be withdrawn. 



SOaETY FILES TWENTY SUITS 

Sydney S. Cohen, president of the Mo- 
tion Picture Theatre Owners of America, 
is made defendant in twenty suits for in- 
fringement of copyright, filed . in the 
United States District Court by The 
American Society of Composers, Authors, 
and Publishers on Monday, through the 
Society's general counsel, Nathan- Burkan. 
This action comes within ten days after 
Cohen announced to the A. S. C. A & P., 
and the press, that he would discontinue 
the licenses held by the five tiieatres in the 
city and would play music not in the cata- 
logue of that organization. 

Immediately after the letter was re- 
ceived by the Society the five motion pic- 
ture houses owned by Cohen were placed 
on the Socie^s regular list for inspection 
and infringements were reported at every 
house at each performance. The five 
theatres are the Bronx Strand, West- 
chester avenue; Empire^ Westchester 
avenue and 161st street; Fa/s, Bos- 
ton Road; North Sta*^ Fifth avenue and 
105th street, and the Tremont Theatre, 
178th Street Not only were popular num- 
bers played at the Cohen houses but whole 
musical comedy scores were among _ the 
selections rendered on various occasions, 
according to the Society's complaints. 

The sudden move inade by Cohen on 
the eve of the National Convention of Mo- 
tion Picture Theatre Owners when the an- 
nual election of officers 'will be made early 
in May in Chicago, is characterized by J. 
C. Rosenthal, general manager of the A 
S. C A. & P., as a "grand-stand play" on 
the part of Cohen who expects some dis- 
cussion, at the convention of the situation 
regarding the so-called "music tax." Mr. 
Rosenthal pobted out that Cohen was 
among the very first who took out licenses 
for his theatre back in 1917. Since then, 
as head of the movie theatre owner's or- 
ganization he has advised and worked 
against picture houses taking out licenses 
to perform copyrighted music for profit. 
That the film houses owned by Cohen 
were licensed by the Society, was not gen- 
erally known until last year when that 
fact was made public by the A. S. C A 
& P. "Cohen's reason for the grand-stand 
play is obvious" said Mr. RosenthaL 

"The peculiar thing about Mr. Cohen's 
actions" continued Mr. Rosenthal, "is that 
he said in his letter that he took out the 
A S. C A &.P., licenses in 1917 because 
it 'was under duress and fear of oppression. 
Why should he have been afraid of a 
puny little organization that the Society 
vras in its early days in 1917? This same 
man Cohen defied tiie strongest opposition 
in the motion picture field, and he fought 
Zukor, Loew and other powerful combina- 
tions. Yet he claims that the Society 
..coerced near five years ago. 

"Another thing we fail to understand 
about Cohen is the alleged library of more 
than 10,000 selections he has gathered to- 
gether exdu^ve of copyrighted music in 
the Soqrty's catalogue, and _ which was 
claimed (o be sufficient music of every 
variety for every exhibitor in the United 
States, to play without fear of an infringe- 
ment. 'What has become of that library? 
Despite this collection of music said to be 
made by Mr. Cohen, his theaters have de- 
liberately played our music at every per- 
formance." 



MUSIC MAN IS AN ACTOR 

Milton Wallace, assistant to Leo Lewin 
in the band and orchestra department of 
Waterson, Berlin & Snyder, was given an 
important part in "Abie's Irish Rose" last 
week, the show bong the first legitimate 
stage experience. 



BORNSTEIN GOING TO EUROPE 

Saul Bomstein. general manager of Irv- 
ing Berlin, Inc., is sailing for Europe this 
week on his annual busmess and pleasure 
trip. 



19 




REEVES WANTS 
TO LEASE HIS 
FRANCHISE 

SHOW HAD STORMY SEASON 



Al Reeves is trying to lease his fran- 
chise on the Columbia Circuit for next sea- 
son. This has been a pretty hard season 
for the "old Pal." His troubles first started 
at the beginning of the present season, 
: when his show was taken off the circuit 
■ the second week he was out to be reor- 
; ganized. After representatives of the cir- 
' cuit had seen the show at the Casino, 
Brooklyn, they would not allow it to play 
the Empire, Newark, the next week, but 
instead Reeves was compelled to put on a 
new show with a big change in the cast, 
which opened the following week in Pater- 
. son. 

During its trip in the West it is said that 
thcxe were many complaints as to the con- 
dition, of the show, so much so that Reeves 
was notified a few -weeks back that his 
show could not play the Colmnbia, New 
York, but had to close in Montreal and 
the "Bon Tons" was given the Reeves time 
' for the balance of the season. 

Reeves is now trying to lease the show 
for the coming season, but as the fran- 
chises have but one more year to run, it 
will be a bard job trying to get someone 
to take over the show for that period. It 
will mean an investment of from $15,000 
. to $20,000 for an entire new show and 
most producers do not feel that it is worth 
the chance. If it had two or three years 
more to run, then there would be a chance 
to get the production money back, as well 
as making some money. 

There will be a big scramble by the pro- 
ducers next season to put over a great 
show, as it will depend entirely by the 
show given and the business done by the 
show, if the. franchise will be renewed for 
another term of five years, starting the fol- 
lowing season. 

It is also said that no producer will be 
allowed to have more than two shows the 
following season and the Columtna offi- 
cials feel that a producer can satisfactorily 
put on but two shows. 

Rtunors around Broadway and Forty- 
Seventh Street late Monday afternoon 
were that Reeves had succeeded in trans- 
ferring his franchise for next season. One 
was Uiat Barney Gerard had taken over 
the show, but this could not be confirmed 
either at the office of the Columbia Amuse- 
ment Company or at Gerard's office. Both 
: Barney and Louis Gerard were away for 
the afternoon and General Manager Sam 
' A. Scribner had left for the day. J. Her- 
bert Mack, president of the circuit, said 
that he knew nothing of Gerard taking 
over the franchise and the way he said it, 
one would be led to believe that there was 
no triith to the rumor. 

Another rumor was that Arthur Put- 
nam who was with the Reeves Show the 
past season wanted to take the show over 
with his brother, a well known theatrical 
man of Newark, as his backer, but this 
could not be confirmed either. It is said 
that at the time of going to press Reeves 
was still looking. 



GEORGE SHELTON SIGNS 

George Shelton, principal comedian of 
the "Laughin' Thru 1923" this season on 
the Mutual Circuit, signed contracts last 
week< for the new Clark and .McCullou^ 
Show on the Columbia Circuit for next 



HERK MAY RETURN TO BURLESQUE 

I. H. Hcrk, former head of the Affiliated 
Theatres Company, who recently filed a 
petition in bankruptcy which, according to 
the schedule 'filed, shows that he owes over 
a million dollars, is contemplating returning 
to burlesque, a field in which he was some- 
thing of a figure before he became associ- 
ated with the Affiliated, which attempted to 
put over the imit show idea for Shubert 
vaudeville. 

Herk, according to report, told an ac- 
quainunce this wedc that if the Sbuberts 
did not provide something for him for next 
season he would return to burlesque. 

Herk, before he became connected widi 
the Affiliated, was with the American Bur- 
lesque Association, holding the office of 
president. Herk may start work on the 
promotion of a new circuit, a subject in 
which he is said to be still interested despite 
his excursion into the two-a-day. 



EBIPRESS COMING DOWN 

Milwaukee, Wis., April 18. — The Em- 
press Theatre, this city, whidi has been 
under lease to Hank Goldenberg for a 
nundier of years, is to be torn down and 
a large office building, it is said, will be 
erected on the ground. The Empress has 
been playing burlesque stock for a number 
of years and closed for good last Saturday 
night 

GERARD SHOW FOR BOSTON 

Barney Gerard has engaged the follow- 
ing for his "Follies of the Day" for the 
run at the Gayety, Boston: Hunter, Cole 
and Htmter, Bert and Beth Mathews, Ethel 
Howard and Jimmy Plunkett. The Cali- 
fornia Trio and Julia de Cameron will close 
with the show in Pittsburgh. The Califor- 
nia Trio will open in vaudeville. 



CLARK AND MURPHY IN ACT 

Dan Clark and Danny Murphy are play- 
ing vaudeville in the Middle West They 
are working at the Electric Theatre, St 
Joe, Mo., last half of this week. 

These boys have been working co.itinu- 
ously since their show "Temptations 1923" 
closed in Kansas City. 



BENEFIT FOR BURKHART 

A benefit will be tendered to Howard 
Burkhardt, treasurer of Hurtig and Sea- 
mons Theatre, and George Ollendork, the 
assistant treasurer of the house, on Sunday, 
May 27. A big array of both burlesque 
and vaudeville talent have agreed to ap- 
pear. 

PEACHES PONTON IN STOCK 

Peaches Ponton, ingenue of the "Laugfain* 
Thru" company this season, will open in 
stock in Buffalo at the close of her regu- 
lar burlesque season. Miss Ponton has 
been very successful on the Mutual Circuit 
this season. 



VERA SCHULTZ MARRIED 

Vera Schultz. of the "Laughin Thru" 
show, was married in Hoboken by a Jus- 
tice of the Peace on April 17, to George 
July, a non-professional of Springfield, 
Mass. The show was playing the &yety 
Brooklyn at the time. 

NEW GERARD SHOW NAMED 

Barney Gerard will call his new Colum- 
bia Circuit show "All In Fun." This show 
will take the place of "Keep Smiling." 
iWill Fox, formerly of Fox and Stewart, 
has been signed for this show, also Murray 
and Irwin. 



ABBOTT FORMS 
NORTHERN 
N. Y. CIRCUIT 

nVE HOUSES FOR MUTUAL SHOWS 



Harry Abbott, who has been managing 
the Garden Theatre, Bufblo, with big suc- 
cess the past season, has organized the 
Abbott Theatrical Enterprises in Buffalo, 
which company will control a number of 
theatres in Northern part of the state and 
in Canada. Abbott is the president of the 
company and Jake LeVine is the treasurer. 
Up to tite present time the compaiw have 
five houses in which they will book Uutial 
shows next season. Tfiese houses are lo- 
cated in Rochester, Niagara Falls, Ham- 
ilton, London and Toronto. It is also said 
that the firm will have one or more bouses 
in the city of Buffalo. 

There are but six shows playing this 
wrek on the ^Mtitual Circuit Three more 
are still playing otx the circtiit but 
at . •.til •» oF -his wedt Three shows 
r\. .\. L . ^curday night They are 
Oirls ■ the Follies," "Pat White Re- 
vue" ana "Round the Town." 

"Girls a la Carte" are playing under the 
title of "Lid Lifters" at ^Ubany. and 
"Lalfin' Thro," under the title of "Merry 
Whirl," in Wilkes-Barre. 

A meeting of the Board of Directors of 
the Mutual was held last Saturday, which 
lasted nearly all day. A list of the fran- 
chise holders for next season wais to be 
given out at that time, but it has been 
withheld until May 5, whoi the list it is 
expected will be complete. 

General Manager Al Singer left New 
York Sunday for Chicago, it could not be 
learned at headquarters what his mission 
is. 

George Gallagher did not leave New 
York last Monday on a trip to secure new 
houses' for the Mutual Grcuit as an- 
nounced in these columns. All plans had 
been made and the railroad ticket pur- 
chased for Washington, when the arrange- 
ments were called off. 

It could not be learned from the officials 
of the circuit why the sudden change of 
mind took place and it was just as much 
a surprise to Gallagher, when he was in- 
formed late Monday afternoon that he was 
not to go. 

REVUE TICKETS OH SALE 

Tickets for the Burlesque 0\A Revne 
were placed on sale last Saturday. Lou 
Lessor is handling the advance sale of the 
tickets, making his headqiiarters in Room 
203. Columbia Theatre Building. The 
scale of prices are - box seats, $3 JO ; or- 
chestra seats, $3 JO; first four rows in 
balcony, $3.30; balance of the balcony, 
$2.75, and the gallery, $1.10. 

The revue will be held on Sunday night, 
May 20. 

BROADHURST QUITS SHOW 

George Broadhurst, one of the comedians 
of "Laughin' Thru," walked out of the 
show at the Gayety, Brooklyn. last Thurs- 
day, according to Manager Bud Abbott. 
This is the second show Broadhurst has 
walked out of this season, the other being 
with the "Jazz Babies" and it happened in 
Pittsburgh last fall. 



SEARS LEAVES EMPIRE 

! Fred Sears resigned as manager of the 
iNew Empire, Qeveland, last' week and re> 
Itunied to New York. This hoiise is now 
lEfei^ng.^Qdf Jb?rlesque. _1 



BO<MCED FOR BUOU 

Pbiladelpbia, April 23. — ^The priiicifols 
booked in stock next week at the Bijoa- 
are Charles Marshall, Abbie Leonard, 
Peggy Day, Alf Giles, Ray Leanse and 
■Harry Ke«Jer. . . 



BROWNING RE-ENGAGED 

William Browning, character man of the 
"Bubble Bubble" company, has been re- 
engaged by Billy K. Wells for next season. 
Browning signed a contract last wedc while 
playing the Columbia. 

BETTY PALMER CLOSING 

Betty Palmer, soubrette of ^Giggles," 
has given in her notice to- dose with that 
show in Boston this wedc, 'i'^'-' 



"BON TON GIRLS," BACK 
AT COLUMBIA, IS 
AGAIN ENTERTAINING 

The "Bon Ton Girls" featuring Johnny 
Barry is at the Columbia this week for a 
return engagement. The reason for its 
return is that it has taken the place of 
the Reeves Show on the Circuit, having 
jumped into Boston last week from Buf- 
falo taking the time up from there. 

The show is almost the same as it was 
earlier in the season. One change in the 
cast is noticeable; Burton Carr is the new 
straight man having only recently joined 
the . show. A scene in one, with the com- 
edians has been added, which hdps to 
hold up the spot it has been placed m. 

Johnny Barry is a clever comedian and 
one that is far out of the ordinary. He 
is a quidc thinker and a fast worker. He 
knows how to deliver. Bob Startzman is 
working opposite Barry and he too knows 
the art of handling comedy. Both boys 
are corking good hoofers and do fine team 
work. 

Burton Carr is new to Columbia audi- 
ences and he made a fine impression Mon- 
' day afternoon. He is a, tall wdl bnih 
young fellow and carries himsdf wdL He 
reads lines nicdy and can wear clothes. 
Car has a fine singing voice and re^sters 
with his manben. 

Looking as though she had just stepped 
out -of beauty exhibit, Gerttude Bedc, 
ODC of burl^ua's prettiest sonbrettes, 
never looked prettier. Miss Bedc is pretty 
in both face and form and she wears 
dresses that just set her style of 'beauty 
off to the best advantage, but good looks 
is not all that this little lady has. She 
has all that goes to make her a first clan 
soubrette. . She dances nicely, reads lines 
wdl and can snrd^ put a number over. 

Jean De Lisle u the prima doona but 
unfortunately Miss De lisle has evidently 
had a hard season as her voice -was 
not in any too fine shape Monday. She 
looked wdl however and went throned 
her scenes well. 

Lou Barry danced herself into the good 
graces of the house and put over her 
numbers nicely. 

^ I^ve Kindler did his singing and sper. 
dalty in one and put it over. 

Carr offered a singing specialty that was 
appreciated. He gave one number and 
surdy sang it well. 

The eomedy scene in one that was added 
was given by Barry, Startzman, Carr and 
the Misses Beck and Barry, It has many 
laughs. 

Barry and Startzman's dancing specialty 
just about stopped the show. ' Thoe two ' 
boys are sure hounds, when it comes to 
hoofing. . 

Another specialty that was well received 
was Gertrude Beck and the Frasier Trio. 
Miss Beck at the piano and the three boys 
playing string instruments. It's a hi^ 
class musical act and one that would snrdy 
go over in the two day -vaudeville bouses. 

The "Bon Tons" is a fine comedy show 
and has a capable cast of prindpals. Ifs 
a very pleasing entertainment — Sm. 

GILBERT •n-AB" FOR COUTTS 

Billy Gilbert will stage a "tab" to open 
on the Johnny Coutts Cinniit, May 14. 
This will be the week after the "Radio 
Girls" dose. Gilbert will work in the 
"tab." 



BENTLEY FOR MUTUAL SHOW 

Julius Michaels has engaged Harry 
Bentley for his Mutual Circuit show next 
season. Bentl^ wDl be the piiudpa l 
comedian and will also produce the show. 



. JACQUE WILSON SIGNS 

Jacque Wilson, ingenue this season with 
'^oUy Town," signed a contract last wedc 
with' Hurtig & Seamon for one of tlieir 
.Colombia Cjrcmt .^biafiM.Jor next 



20 THE NEW YORK CLIPPER April 25. 192S 




April 25. 1923 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



21 



PRE-PUBLICATION ANNOUNCEMENT 

TO ALL SINGING ACTS- 

We offer you an oi^JOftunity to secure some absolutely 

NEW UNPUBLISHED SONG MATERIAL 

and identify yoursdf with die introduction of one of die many good song numbers we are In a position to offer you. I 
you have room in your act for one or more good numbers, visit our professional dqiaztment at once, as we are prqiared 
to supply songs that will fit most any occasion. Out-of-town acts may either ¥nite or phone their fcouiremaita to oar 
professional manager and we will mail c(^ies of songs suitable. 

KNICKERBOCKER HARMONY STUDIOS 



FBAMK A. BRADY. Prafci 

1647 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CHY 



B. F. KEITH BOOKING EXCHANGE 
Week of April 30, 1923 

HEW YOBX CITT 
&lT«nide — Val^ntlDe & B«U — Rhodes & WstHun 
— Anderson A Burt — At Hennftn — Valerie Bersere 
& Co.— Walter & Wlters— Marlon Morgan Dancer* 
— Rome ii Oaat. 

Colonial— Am/ Dean— Ffank Ward— Seed & Aua- 
tln — Qulxey Four — Morton dc Olaas — Beth Tate — 
Vincent Lopei & Orcbeatia— Fenton & Fields. 

Boyal- Arnaut Trio— Lrtell & Fant— Harriet 
nempel & Co. — Gonlon & Ford — Bob Ball — Wanka 
—Sybil Vane — Wllllama & Wolfoa— HTinack. 

list StiMt — Fred Sumner A Co. — Dresa Be- 
Iieorsal— Watta & Hawley— Brown Bisters— Stan- 
ley Galllnle & Co. 

Alhambn — WllUe Bale & Bro. — Block & Dun- 
lap — Mceban*s Docs — Harrj Boms Co. — Vadle 
A Oygl- Herbert Clifton & Co.— lust Ont of 
Knickers — Marlon Harrlsa- Frldkln & Bboda. 

Broadway — Kovaca ± Qoldner — Joat Out of 
Knickers — Frawley dt lAOlse — Zelda Santley. 

Jefferson (First Half)— Julia Qetrltj — Murray 
^ Helen — Clark & Bergman — Runaway Four — 
Harry Bums dc Co. (Second Bait) — AI Herman — 
Lewla & Body. 

FiankllB (First Half) — Al Herman — Harry Stod- 
dard & Band. (Second Halt)— BUI Robinson— 
Ruth Boye, 

B«s«at (First Half) — Ceo. Yeoman — Jans & 
Whalen— Roth Roye. (Second Hair)-^ulla <3er- 
rlty — Al dt Fannie Stcdman — Runaway Four. 

(>>llsenm (First Half)— Ryan, Weber & Byan — . 
WIlllanA Sl Wolfns. (Second Half)— Ruby Nor-* 
ton, 

Fordham (First Balf) — Harriet Bempel & Co. — 
Samoa & Bayea. (Second Half)— Jack Wilson tc 
Co. 

Bamllton (First Half)— Nannie Dawn. (Second 
Half) — Geo. Yeoman — Barry Stoddard & Band — 
Santos & Hayes. 

BROOELTir, N. T. 

Orphenm— Tim & Kitty O'Mcara— Roxy Laroeca 
—Wood 4 Wyed Co. — Gilbert Wells— Adelaide & 
HuKbea- Ted & Betty Bcaly— Barry Stoddard & 
Band — Olcson & Johnson— Osborne Trio. 

Bushwick— Rutb . Jt Jean Flfei^Alf RIpon— 
George* — Crawford & Broderlck— Vincent lApea & 
Band— Harry Jolson— Cretle Ardlne & Co.— Moore 
A FVeed — Pour Mounters. 

Biveia (nrat Half)- Bill Robinson— Ruby Nor- 
ton— i>!wia & Do<ly. (Second Half) — Ryan, Weber 
A Byan — Ethel MacDonougb— Harry Buma & Co. 

FUtbDsk— Will 4: Gladys Abem— Tlie Briania— 
Jack ■•Rnbe" Clifford— Gus Edwards' Reyne, 

Far Bockaway (Second Half)— Jane & Wbalen— 
Harriet Rempel & Co.— Freda & Anthony— Wil- 
liams & Wolfns — Emily I.ea & Co. 

BALTIMOBE, XD. 

Marrland- Florence Brady— Olaen & Johnson 

Meeban's Dors— Onn Munson— Duel De Kerekjarto 
— T-eedom & Stamper. 

BOSTON, KABS. 
Kalth'a— Al Striker— Wyetb & Wynn— Al K. 
Hall & Co.— Rita Gould & Co.— Stars of tbe 
Future — Rube Clifford— Julian Eltlnge — Bert Flt»- 
glbbon. 

BTTFTALO, N. T. 
Bhaa'a— Murilock. Mayo tc Murdock— Jack Nor- 
to;i & Co. — Creole Fanhlon Plate — Rich Hayes — 
Franklin Charles — Bersn & Flint. 

CIXVELAHS, 0. 

Palace— Miller Girls— Frank Dlion— Dooley & 
Morion — Prlncesa Radjab. 

105th St.— Pour rhllllps— Miss Juliet— Lawyers' 
Quartette — Rome d: l>unn. 



DARL MacBOYLE 

EXCLUSIVE MATERIAL OF EVERY 
DESCRIPTION 
For RacogaUad Parforaer* Onlr 

ue Weal 4eilk SI. New York 

Fhoaa BryMt Z4f4 
"IF IT ISNT RIGHT I MAKE IT RIGHT" 



laSUBEWLLE MILLS 



SETBOIT, MICH. 
Tampla— Mabel Ford & Co. — Dugan & Raymond 
— Tbe Crelgbtosa— Yvette Rugel — Crntta & Haley 
— Stanley & Buns — Herbert & Dar*. 

ORAHS BAPIDB, MICH. 
£mpraBa— Tbe Herberta — Weber A. BIdnor — 
rressler dt Eallsa — Qus Fowler. 

lOWEIX, ICABB. 
Keith's — FroElol — Ray & Emma Dean — Wordan 
Bros. — Artistic Treat — Peronne dc Ollrer — Danny 
Dugan & Co. — Ollrer & Dip. 

kontbzaIh oAir. 

Prlnoaaa (April 2e) — Van dt Tyaon — Florence 
Hobson— Jarrls & Harrison — Warner Amana Trio 
—For Pity Sake, 

MOHTBEAIt, OAB. 
(AprU SO)— D, D. H.— Venlu Ooold- PUn En- 
tertainers — Burke & Dnrkin— Espe & Dotton — 
SamaroS & Sonla — Baader. Lavelle A Co, — Bocke- 

well & Foi, 

PHn.ADZUHlA, PA- 

Xaitb's— Osborne Trio— Vincent O'Donnell— lay- 
dell & Macy — Crawford & Broderfck — A. ft Li. 
Sheldon — Morgan Dancera. 

PITTBBnBGE, PA. 
DsTla — Cerene Troupe — Bymack — Jack Norwortb 
— EJddle MUIer— .Margie <^atea. 

POBTUBS, KB. 
Keith's— Bealey & Gross— Polly & Ol — Alfred 
Farrell & Co.— Franklyn. Ardell A Co. — Wyetta & 
Wynn — Lamo Trio. 

BOOHE8TEB. H. T. 
Xalth's— Florence Colebrook tc (^.— Boatock'a 
Riding School— McLaughlin tc Erans— Artie Meb- 
llnger — Homer Bomalne. 

BTRACUSE, V. T. 
Kelth'a (AprU 2S-28)— Gautler tc Pony— Mlller- 
ablp A Gerard- Ralley & Cowan— Olcott * Marr 
Ann — Stanley & BImes — Syracuse Collectana Band. 

TOROinO, OUT, 
Bhaa'a — Wilton Sisters — FolRom. Denny & Band 
— Walih & Ellla— Arthur Lloyd— Bryan ft Brod- 
ertck — Senator Fonl — ScTen Arabian Nights. 

WASHIHOTOH, D. C. 

Kalth'a Heraa & Wills— Vincent O'Donnell— 

The Show Off— Ruby Norton— Paradia Band— The 
Merton Myatery— Jack Norworth— Sheldon ft Bal- 
lanllne. 



ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 
Week of April 29, 1923 

CHICAGO, nx. 

Palace— Leo Carlllo — Whiteman'a Cafe De Paria 

— Cressy ft Dnyne-^hlef Caupollcan — Zelaya— 
Yip Yip Yapbankera— Berg & English. 

Btato Laha — Vera Gordon— Frank Famum ft 
Band — Billy Glaeon — Polly Moran — Dooley tc 
Storey — Jock LaVler— Lady Allce'a Peta. 

DENVER, COLO. 
Orphenm- Stella Maybew— Steppe ft O'Neill — 
Four of Ua— Rath Broa. — Coogan tc Casey — C^n- 
alnoa— LaMont Three— Farrell Taylor ft Co. 

SES KODIEB, lA. 
Orphaam — Dotaon — Owen McGWeney — B. ft B. 
Wheeler — Wm. ft Joe Mandel — Gautler'a Brlck- 

layen. 

XARBAS OITT, MO, 
Orphenipi — Vale5ka Suratt ft Co. — Patricola — 
Renee lUberU & Band— Yip Tip Yapbankcta— 
Edwin George — Wbltefleld ft Ireland — Weaver ft 
Wearer. 

Main Btreat— Yip Yip Yapbanken- Patricola— 
WeaTer Broa. — Renee Roberta ft Girls — Dora Ea- 
tertalnara. 

LOB AROELES, 
OrphesB— Hal Skelley— Wright ft Dietrich — 
Tbe Sheik — Four CamerQns — WUbor ft Adama — 
Sargent ft Marrln — Land of Fantasy. 



Hill Straat— Henry B, Walthall— Moon ft Ken- 
dall — Bravo, Mlcta. ft TruJIllo — Harrard, Wyofred 
ft Bruce — Karl Emmy's Pets — Jsck Benny — Adier 
ft Ross. 

MILWAT7XEE, WIS, 
Falaca — Mn. Rodolph Valentino— Myeia ft Han- 
ford — Foley ft LaTour — Jobnson ft Baker. 

lasvEAPOLiB, mnr, 

Hennepin — Cryatal Bennett — Pierce ft Ryan — 
Babb Carroll ft Syrell — Love Slaters — Ned Nor- 
wurth — sun of Yeaterday— Fannie Brlce — Lucas 
ft Inea — Oabom'a Norelty Orchestra. 

OAEIiAHS, " ST. 
Orphanm — DeMarcoa ft Sbelks — Leon Vararac — 
Gibson ft (^nnelll — Alibea Lacaa— Flanlgan ft 
Morrison — Clara Howard. 

POBTIARD, OBEGOR 
Orphanm— MItty ft TIlllo— Cbarlea Irwin— Ja Da 
Tlirea — T^to — Morria ft Campbell — McDonald Tbrea 
— Sylvester Family — Fire Lelanda. 

BACBAMEHTO ARS FBEBHO 
Orphaam — Dance Creatlona of 1023 — GlanTilla ft 
Sandere — F. ft T. Sablnl— Baru Onukl — Don Va- 
leria Trio— White Broa, — Bronson & Baldwin. 

BT. LOUIS, MO. 
Orphenm — Cerroll ft Flaher — Frances Vanesal ft 
Williams — Johnny Burke — Billy Dale — W. 0. 
Fields — Vntand Gamble — JoKepblne Amoros. 



JACK 



CLIFF 



THOMAS & HAYMAN 

Faatnrad with JACK CONNORS REVUE 
PLAYING B. F. KEITH dRCUIT 
Sta Feat of SUa and Baoea wllh ■ 
Movemeat of Tlair Own. 



BT, PAUL, MDnr, 
Palace — Six Hassans — Davla ft Darnell — Irene 
Franklin — Joe Cook — Alexandera ft John Smith — 
Snow, Columbus ft Hoctor. 

BAR FRABOISCO, CAI,. 
Orphaam — Aunt Jemima ft Band — Ernest Blatt 

Walton ft Brandt — Gatdell, Pryor ft White — 

Olero— Sylreater Family— Snell ft Vernon — Yar- 
raark- 

Golden Oata— Utile Cottage — Wylle ft Hartman 
— Fted. Hughes— Cummins ft White— Joe BoUey 
ft Lalid. 

SEATTLE, WASH, 
Orphaum— Frank Melntyre — Haye ft Eberle— 
Tony ft Norman — Sylvia Clark— Bobby McLean— 
Three White Kubna — Gordon ft BIca. 

VARCOirVEB, B. C. 
Orphenm— Bloaaom Seeley — Clayton ft Edwarda 
— Flmlda Reveries-^, ft 1. Connelly— Frank 
Whitman — Doreo — Skatelles. 



PANTAGES CIRCUIT 
.Waek of April 30, 1923 

^yimaixsa. mar. 

McBaons — Connolly ft Frances — ^Telephone Tan- 
gle — Oallerlnl Slstera — Warren ft O'Brien — Lea 
Oladdans. 

BEOIHA ABD BASEATOOH 
Leon ft MItsI— Three Falcone— Callahan ft Bllaa 
— Puirella ft Ramsay — JoUet Dlka — Clay Crouch 
ft Co. 

TRAVEL 

Laura DeVine — Early ft Lalgbt — Harry Seymour 
— Krais ft Wblte — F>ankle ft Johnnie — Gautler'a 
Tow Shop. 

BPOKASS. WASH, 
Martlnelll— Conn ft Albert— KUsa ft Briniant— 
Dance Brolndoaa — Fnnda Benanlt — Geo. Maya. 



■BATTLE, WAHH. 
Detroit Trio — Speedera — Nan Balperin — Chuck 
Haaa — Cronin ft Bart — Reno Blaten ft AlleiL 
VARCOWEB, B. O, 
"Whirl of the World." 

RELyBOHAM, WA8R. 
PhU. La Ttuka— Mack ft Casttaton— Olga Mlab- 
ka Co. — Charbot Tortoal Co. — Waltar Weama — Six 
Sheika of Araby. 

XACOMA, WASH. 
Paaqnall Bi«a. — Dnmmlea — Priuctoa A Vemoo 
Alpine Ihtee — Ed AUen ft Taxi — Burke ft Battr- 
PORTLARS, ORB. 
De I^ooi Duo — Jim ft Jack— La Fine ft Bmair 
— Marriage venoa Divorce — Regal ft Moon Co. — 
Hori Ttlo. 



Togo— DaTla ft McCoy— Twenty Ulnutaa In 
piiaatowa— Flnley ft HUI— Willie Broa.— Cbaplaa. 

TIL. IMS BETANT 

E. T¥F.MMKNDi NGEBe INC 
JEWELERS 



U WESTMTH BTBBR 



HEW TOBK 



BAR nAROnCO, CAL 

Bot> IJK Salle Co. — Joe Jackson — EqnlUa Broa. — 
Lewis ft Norton — Chick Supreme — Boae ft Boma. 

OARLARD, OAL, 
Schepp'a Clrcua— Caveman Love — Hanat4, Holt 
ft K.— Hope Vernon— Deway ft Boceta— Jack 
Doran. 

LOB AROELIB, OAL, 
Foxwortb ft Francia— Five Janaeya— Moris Sla- 
ter*— Chaa. Howard ft Co. — Tony ft George— Ada 
Earle ft Lewla. 

BAR SIEOO. CU. 
Bbelk's Favorite — ZIntoar Brae. — Harry Bloom — 
Man Bant. . 
LORD REACH. OAL 
Bva La Rue — Rial ft Undatrom — Bogera, Boy 
ft Bogers— Virginia Belles— Morrisaey ft Toong. 
SALT LARE UITI, UTAH 
Eva Tanguay — I-a Dora ft Beekman— Gnea ft 
Eddie Parka— Oklahoma Pour— Bert Walton. 
OOSER, UTAH 
The Lavollaa — Three la a Crowd — Ford ft Ttaly 
—Stephen ft HoUlater— Vaidon ft Perry— Btile- 

clalra Broa. 

DBHVEB, COLO, 
Santiago Trio— ^thlte ft Barry — Harry Hioaa — 
Bannef orda — Maode'' leona. 

COLOBASO BPBIHaB AXD PUEBLO 
The Lumara — Valleclta Leoparda — Sherman, Van 
ft Hyman— Buth Budd— rhllbrick ft De Voc — 
Untah Masterman. 

(Continued on page 26) 



Th* Gttardian oi u 
Good Complexion 




STEINS MAKE UP 




HOLDS THE CENTRE 
OF THE STAGE 



22 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 25, 1923 




OUTDOOR EXPOSITIONS 



' CLEANING UP OUTDOOR SHOWS 

Chicago, April 23. — The Showman's 
Legislative Committee have fired their 
first gmi in their campaign to eliminate 
vice and gambling in outdoor show busi- 
ness. The campaign is for the promul- 
gation of better and cleaner shows, devoid 
of the objectionable features that have 
been responsible for their being barred en- 
tirely from several states and in others 
through the subterfuge of prohibitive li- 
cense fees. The campaign is in charge of 
Thomas J. Johnson, general counsel of the 
organization and supreme director of the 
organized showmen. 

Outdoor sbowmoi, both members and 
non-members of the Showmen's Legisla- 
tive Committee, most comply with the 
moral standard set by the committee or 
be eliminated. Mr. Johnson declared. 

The rapid increase of vice^ gambling and 
other objectionable features in outdoor 
shows within the last few years caused 
the showmen to receive a had name 
throughout the country, said Johnson. 
Showmen, he added, saw that something 
must be done to save their business from 
complete annihilation by public disap- 
proval and therefore the showman's legis- 
lative committee was organized. 

Objectional features of shows are barred 
ia a platform decided upon by the commit- 
tee. Each showman is asked to sign a 
pledge abiding by the committee's plat- 
form, the conditions of which follows : 

Please take notice that the Executive 
Board has unanimously decided that the 
following shows, games and persons are 
considered detrimental to the interest of 
of the out-door show profession, and are 
therefore condemned and absolutsly pro- 
hibited from being permitted or tolerated 
in or about any out-door amusements: 

All forty-nine camps prohibited ; 

All hoochie-coochie shows prohibited; 

All Hawaiian village shows with danc- 
ers prohibited; 

All fairy in the well prohibited; 

All inunoial and suggestive shows pro- 
hibited; 

All shows exclusively for men prohib- 
ited; 

All shows with final blow-off prohibited ; 

All aiake-eating shows prohibited; 

All glomming shows pr<^bited; 

All gypsies prohibited from being 
artnmd, associated or connected with out- 
door amnsement; 

All persons under the age of 16 prohib- 
ited from playing any game unless accom- 
panied by parents or guardian; 

All games where the operator, attendant 
or any person may, by mechanical device, 
or by pmching. squeezing, trick, brake, or 
Otherwise, control its speed or determine 
its outcome prohibited ; 

All games wherein money is given as 
prizes prohibited ; 

An games where prizes may be ex- 
changed for money prohibited; 

Sdling, giving away or disposing of any 
liquor to the public prohibited ; 

Carrying, selling, giving away or _ dis- 
posing of any dope or narcotics prohibited ; 

All employes not allowed to associate 
with anyone who is known as a dope user ; 

Indecent, immoral or disreputable em- 
ployes not allowed to be connected with any 
ont-door amnsement; 

Carrying, selling, disposing, giving away 
or exhibitiiig any indecent card, picture, 
pog t ei' or liteiatnre prohibited ; 

An restaurants, eating places, refresh- 
ment and drinking stands must be kept in 
a clean and santitary condition. Prke 
list of all articles' for sale must be dis- 
planred iirominently at said places ; 

An unsafe or impro^ly constructed 
ride or apparatus prohibited; 

You wfll therefore see that none of the 
above emnnerated objections are allowed 
in. on or about your enterprise. 

A cofy of the above mohibited list has 
been sent to mmiidpal ooicials of all cities 
in the country and these officials are being 
requested to report any violation of this 
platform either by members or non-mem- 
ben. 

"Whenever a man is fotmd to be con- 



ducting an objectionable show, we will 
first ask him to stop it or eliminate the 
objectionable feature," said Johnson. "If 
this does not have the desired effect, we 
will appeal to local authorities. If that 
fails we will put the entire story in the 
newspapers. 1 think that wiU be effec- 
tive." 



DREAMLAND OPENS MAY 26 

'Newabk, N. J., April 21. — Dreamland 
Park wiU open its season on May 26, with 
one of the largest drcuses ever given in 
an amusement park. The management of 
the park has booked twenty' big sensa- 
tiooal acts from the New York Hippo- 
drome. Some of the acts booked the first 
few weeks are Captain Floyd Whorley, 
Fred Cunningham, P. De Valty, E. Ho- 
cum, Josie La France, Great Calvert, 
Beckwith Lion Act, Bernard Trio, Sensa- 
tional Meredith, The Gauthiers, J. Cole- 
man, H. Iimian,. D, O'Brien, Martin and 
Genett, itea and Rea, Poodles and Doty, 
B. H. Demerest, Rkling Lloyds, MarteUs, 
The Jupitors and Arab Troups. Some of 
the rides are The Pippen, Roller Coaster, 
Lusse Skooter, Gold Mine Ride, Sewers 
of Paris, Frolic and the Old Mill. 

CIRCUS BREAKS GARDEN RECORD 

The Ringling Bros, and Bamum & Baile}' 
Combined Shows, now in their last week 
at Madison Square Garden. New York, 
have broken all records in attendance at 
the Garden, having had two turn-away 
houses last Saturday despite the warm 
weather. After a tour south as far as 
Washington, D. C, the show will come 
north again as far as Newark, N. J., 
and from there play west as far as Ohio. 
From latest reports this circus is the only 
large one to play Philadelphia and Boston 
this season. 



BARNES SHOW FOR EAST 

Murray Pennock, general agent of the 
A1..G. Barnes Trained Wild Animal Cir- 
cus, is due in New York this week. The 
circus is scheduled to play several towns 
close to New York and may possibly play 
one or two lots in the Big City. This will 
be the first time that the Barnes big 
trained animal circus has been this far 
East, it having played as far East as Lan- 
caster, Pa., and enjoyed a very good busi- 
ness. 



WILLS COMING OVER 

Capt. Bertram M. Wills, manager of the 
mid-winter circus and fair which is held 
annually at the Olympic, London, is due in 
New York this week to secure attractions 
for the next show. Clyde Ingalls of the 
Ringling Bros, and Bamum & Bailey 
Shows has been the manager for the circus 
for the past two years and will again be 
with it this coming year. 



JEAN FORD IN STOCK 

Jean Ford, daughter of Hugh Ford and 
Jessie Izzett. will follow the^ footsteps of 
her mother and get her preliminanr stage 
training as a member of the Lyceum 
theatre, Rochester, stock company this 
summer. Miss Ford is a Vassar graduate. 



BUCHANON BUYS ELEPHANTS 

It is reported that Fred Buchanon, man- 
ager of the World Bros. Trained Wild 
Animal Orcus. has purchased the three 
performing elephants from Wm. P. Hall, 
Lancaster, Mo. 



ROUTES 



RlnvliiiK Bnthen-Bamiim mnd Biily Combined 

— Madiion Sqnare Garden, New York Citr. 
Vanh 24-Apra 28; Wuhtngton, D. C. 30- 
April 1; Baltunoie, 2-S. 

Sdlt-Floto— Pera, lad.. 23; Indianapolis, 24; 
Richmond. 25: Springfidd. O.. 26: Coliuntnu. 
27; Newark, 28; Piltsborgh, Pa., SO-May 1. 

Main, Walter L. tt Andrew Downie Show Com- 
bined— On City. Pa.. 25: KiUanins. 26; Btrtler, 
27: New Kensfngton, 28. _ . ... 

Ruuc Shew— Chapd HOL Tcnn_ 2S: Eaglmlte. 
2«: Hnrfreesboto. 277 Bradrnl1e. 28. 

Robinaon. John — Marion. O.. 25;. Uinn. 26: 

. Athen*. 27: Farltembnrv. W. Va.. 28: Hnnting- 
too. W. Va., 30; Charleston. Iby I; Hiddle- 
oort. O.. 2: Marietta, 3: Zanesnlle, 4; Cam- 
bridge 5: Stenbenvflle, 7. 



RIVERSIDE OPENS APRIL 28 

Baltiuore, Md, April 20. — On Satur- 
day, April 28th, River View Park, Balti- 
more's Only Waterfront Amusement Park, 
will open for the summer season of 1923. 
The opening attraction will be "The Div- 
ing Hellkvists" from April 28th-May 22nd. 
The attraction for the following week will 
be "Sherwood, the Shooting Star," For 
two weeks following Sherwood, are 
booked, ' "De Carno." The Sensational 
High Mast Gymnast. Manager William 
J. Fitzsimmons, who is recognized as the 
youngest amusement park manager in 
the country, is negotiating with other "Big- 
time" acts to follow "De Camo." For the 
first time in the history of Baltimore's out- 
door amusement world, Mr. Fitzsimmons 
is giving the population acts of the highest 
type, absolutely free. 
' In addition to the large free act pro- 
gram, there has been installed in River 
View, three new rides, namely, "The 
Dodgem," "The Caterpillar" and "The 
Ocean Wave." A new miniature railroad 
has been installed for the kiddies and the 
pony and goat trucks have been enlarged. 

The Dance Palace has been redecorated 
throughout and George Goldberg and his 
orchestra, who formerly played at the 
Jockey Club, Havana, Cuba, has been en- 
gaged for the coming season. 

Mr. Fitzsimmons and his staff of ex- 
perienced park men have everything ready 
for the opening and they predict a banner 
season for 1923. 



PAUSADES OPENS SATURDAY 

Palisades Park inaugurates its season, 
April 28th, with the massive suif-bathing 
salt water tank swinging into operation 
on May 28th. 

Indications all point to the biggest year 
in its histoiy due to the personal efforts 
of Nicholas M. Schenck, over one thousand 
picnics have been booked, the entire Park 
reconstructed and repainted, the latest in- 
novation in rides constructed called "The 
Caterpillai-j" the dancing pavilion re-laid 
with the finest of Japanese hardwoods, a 
special ultra-violet ray system of purifying 
lamps installed for the tank water whidi is 
pumped through a dozen filters fmn the 
Atlantic, special bookings of Broadway 
acts for the free entertainments and fire- 
work displays on Tuesday and Thursday 
evenings throughout the season with spe- 
cial tend concerts each afternoon and 
evening. 

Over fifty acres have been developed and 
transplanted with two thousand massive 
shade trees for the picnic groves. 

The theatrical colony along the Gay 
White Way has voted Palisades Park an 
ideal spot for their common stamping 
ground and the folk showing on the sum- 
mer circuit will meet each morning for 
their salt water "dip,' without the bug-a- 
boo of sunburn as part of the massive tank 
is always shaded. 



STOCK FOR WHITE CITY 

Jamestown, N. Y., April 21.— White 
City Park on Chautauqua Lake will open 
its tweoty-sixth season on Sunday, May 
27. The season will dose Labor I>ay. 

Maurice A. Shea of New York has a 
ten-year lease of the White Theatre. He 
will install a high class stock company in 
the theatre. 

Many new novelties will be added to the 
toboggan slide. The Figure Eight has 
new breathless dips, as well as many ether 
new attractions. 

Free acts will include high wire, aerial 
features, rolling globe additions, high div- 
ers, trapeze performers and other novel- 
ties. Band concerts will be given after- 
noon and evenings. 



LAKEWOOD OPENS JUNE 18 

Skowhegan, Maine, April 23. — Lake- 
wood Park, a summer amusement center 
operated by the Somerset Traction Com- 
pany, will open on June 18th, the initial 
attraction being the Lakewood Stock Com- 
pany, a dramatic enterprise with players 
engaged from leading New York produc- 
tions and presenting the successes of the 
past season. Other attractions are band 
concerts, dances, boating, bathing, fishing, 
tennis and a tea room. Mr. H. L. Swett 
of Skowhegan is manager of> the park. 



CONEY SEASON OPENS 

The balmy weather last Sunday attracted 
more than 250,000 persons to Coney Island. 
Many dropped down to look over the new 
boardwalk, but incidentally left some of 
their money with the few concessionaires 
already open for business. 

The opening of Luna Park, which has 
been traditionally accepted as the official 
opening of the Coney Island season, is set 
for Saturday, May 12, while the official 
opening of the boardwalk will take place 
three days later. 



EVERETTE IN N. Y. 

, William Everette, Superintendent of the 
James M. Benson Shows, now playing 
Kingston, N. C, was in New York last 
week on business and stopped off on his 
way south to visit the Johnny J. Jones Ex- 
position Shows playing Washington, D. C. 
Mr. Everette reports that business is fair 
through the south and the show will make 
a few long jumps to get in to the northern 
territory. 

FEATURES FOR OCEAN PIER 

Wnj)wooD, N. J., April 21.— The Ocean 
Pier will open early next month with 
Kell/s Slide, Soup Bowl, Razzle Dazzle, 
Down and Out, and fifteen other attrac- 
tions. New features being erected are 
Ferris Wheel, Derby Racing Rfde and the 
Dodgem Ride. 



BROWN A DYER SHOWS DO WELL MIRBACH BACK FROM SO. AMERICA 



Al Dernberg, manager of the Brown & 
Dyer Shows, was in New York last wedc 
Mr. Dernberg is_ figaring on adding sev- 
eral new attractions for his show. The 
show played Atlanta, Ga., last week, and 
had a very good business. 

MIDGETS FOR CONEY 

Among the arrivals on the Newport, 
which arrived from Paris last wedc, were 
a sextette of midgets imported by S. W. 
Gumpertz for his Dreamland show at 
Coney Island. 



Sam. Mirbach of New York has just 
returned from the Centennial at Rio De 
Janeiro. Brazil. Mr. Mirbach had some 
concessions and although the exposition 
was far from being a success most of the 
concession people made a little money. 

RILEY SHOWS OPEN 

Matthew J. Riley Shows opened the sea- 
son of 1923, April 21, at Trenton, N. J. 
The show was scheduled to open April 18 
but on account of the bad weather it was 
advanced a week. 



HANKDURNELL 

•Oiainpioii Trick Rider and Roper 
Again with 

Ringlins Broa. and Bankuin and Bailey Combined Shows 



April 25, 1923 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



23 



SAFE 
DEPOSIT 
VAULTS 



RENTALS $S PER YEAR 
AND UP 

Open 9 A. M. to 10 P. M. 

Chelsea Exchange Bank 

Broadway and Sctranlli Ave. 
at Farty-«!slitli St, New York 



WASHINGTON NEXT CKCUS STAND 

The Ringling Bros, and Barnum & 
Bailey Show train will leave winter quar- 
ters at Bridgeport, Conn., for Washington, 
D. C. and have all of the Tops up and 
every thing in readiness for the Show 
which closes its New York engagement at 
.Madison Square Garden next Saturday 
night April 28th and open the season un- 
der canvas at Washington, D. C, April 
30th and May 1st. 



BRANNAN BOOKING CIRCUS 

Ed. Brannan, general agent of the Gentry 
Bros. Famous Shows and James Patter- 
son's Trained Wild Animal Circus, is due 
in Philadelphia to make arrangements for 
the show, which is to play a greater part 
of the Gentry Bros.' Eastern territory this 



TRAINING BABY ELEPHANTS 

Charles Wier's three baby elephants, that 
he recently purchased, are beug trained to 
do an act by William Embrey and expected 
to be booked at some park near New York 
for this coming season, along with the 
Charles Wiers performing tigers, leopards 
and bears. 



KEYSTONE OPENING IN BALTIMORE 

Sam. Mechanic, manager of the Key- 
stone Exposition Shows, will not open in 
Harve De Grace, Md., plans having been 
changed and the show will open in Balti- 
more, Md. Harry Ramish who was to be 
Mr. Mechanic's partner this season has re- 
signed. 

MORENCY WITH POLACK 

Percy Morency, manager of I. J. Po- 
lack's Enterprises, is in New York City 
from Nashua, N. H., where he was man- 
ager of the Shrine Club's Circus recently 
held there. "The circus was a great suc- 
cess. The next stand is Waterbury, Conn. 



MAIN AGENT IN N. Y. 

F. J. Frink, general agent of the Walter 
L. Main Circus, was in New York last 
week on business. Mr. Frink reports that 
despite the cold weather the show was 
enjoying good business in West Virginia 
and Ohio. 



PLEASURE UACH OPENING 

Bbiogeport, Conn., April 21. — The Pleas- 
ure Beach Park will open its third sea- 
son May 16. This park is situated on 
Long Island Sound at ' the mouth of . 
Bri<teeport Harbor. Fred W. Pearce, a 
-well Imown amusement man of Detroit, 
has been appointed general manager. 

Included in the many rides and amuse- 
ment devices are the Coaster, Whip, 
Dodge'em, Aeroplane Swings, Carrousel, 
Pony Track, Skating Rink and a large 
Dance Hall. "There is also a big athletic 
field and grove. Plans are now being ad- 
vanced for the building of an automobile 
road and a trolley line to the park. 

BALUNGER IN N. Y. 

Tony W. Ballineer, general agent of 
the Sparks World Famous Shows, was in 
New York last week on business. Mr. 
Ballinger says that the five cars added to 
the train for the Wild Animal Department 
was given much praise by the press. The 
Five Fighting Lions, Four Royal Tigers 
Act and the Four Polar Bears with dogs 
and ponies, and the seventeen trained 
horses which were imported from Germany 
this spring make the Sparks Show class 
with any of the Big White Tops. 

ROBINSON CIRCUS OPENS 

The John Robinson Circus, which has 
combing with it the Gollmer Bros. Cir- 
cus, opened its 1923 season at Marion, 
Ind. The weather was fine and there was 
a turn away at both performances. The 
show carries this year several sensational 
wild animal acts in conjunction with the 
regular circus program. Danny Odeum is 
manager and will tour the show through 
the eastern territory. 



SELLS-FLOTO FOR EAST 

The Sells-Floto Circus, after a wonder- 
ful engagement at the Colisseum, Chicago, 
opened in Peru, Ind., their vinter quar- 
ters town, tmder canvas, Monday, April 
23, and will shortly be seen in their eastern 
territorj'. The shows play Pittsburgh, Pa., 
April 30 and May 1. 



MARATHON FOR STARLIGHT 

The annual roller skating marathon pro- 
moted by the Starlight Amusement Park, 
New York, will be greater than ever this 
year according to the entries coming in to 
the headquarters of Victor J. Brown at 
the Park. The last day to register will 
be April 26. 

BENN1E KRAUSE ILL 

Bennie Krause is still confined to his 
hotel in New York, having had a second 
operation performed on his nose last week. 
Mr. Krause is now getting along nicely 
and expects to be out the later part of this 
week. 



WESTCOTT IN NEW YORK 

M. B. Westcott and wife have arrived 
in New York from their home in Chicago, 
where they spent the winter. Mr. West- 
cott will have his rides with the Krause 
Greater Shows this season. 



ELEPHANTS FOR CONEY 

John Robinson's Military Elephants, four 
in number, have been booked by Mr. Evans 
of Luna Park, Coney Island, for one of 
their free acts this coming summer. 



RAMISH WITH DUFOUR SHOWS 

Harry Ramish. late of the Keystone Ex- 
position Shows, is now connected with the 
Lew Dufour Shows. 



IVf 



Tbe 
Marveloas 

Blue Devil of the Air 
Novel Achievement Without a Parallel — Sensation of 
The Century 

PamaBent addma: Can of NEW YORK CUPPER, New York 



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L. WOLFE GILBERT MUSIC CORPORATION 

1658 Broadw^r. New York City 

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Each unit consists of one share of 6% Ctimulative Preferred stock (.%5M 
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Partial parment plan □ 
} uniu — $1.00 weckir □ 
S units — ZOO weekly □ 
10 units — 3.00 weekly □ 
20 units — S.CO weekly □ 
Mark X in block. 



Nam* .... 
AddretM . . 

City 

BunM*s3 . . 
Plum* No. 



Make all checks payable to L. Wolfe Cilbcit Hniie Coiporation 



24 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 25, 1923 



HOUSE MANAGERS PLAYING 
TABS WILL FIND THIS NEW 
SERVICE A REVELATION. 
EVERY TAB MUST MEET A SET 
STANDARD AND WILL NOT BE 
ROUTED UNTIL CAREFULLY 
REVIEWED. 



GET IS TOUCH WITH US 



JOHN L couns 

TABLOID CIRCUIT 

INC. 

Booking the Finest Theatres 
and Musical Tabs Everywhere 

EARL CARROLL THEATRE BLDG. 
50th ST. and SEVENTH AVE. NEW YORK CITY 



REPUTABLE PRODUCERS WILL 
BE GIVEN FIFTY CONSECUTIVE 
WEEKS AFTER YOUR ORGANI- 
ZATION HAS MET OUR STAND- 
ARD. 



A GREAT TAB WILL MAKE 
MORE MONEY THAN A BROAD- 
WAY SHOW. 



GIVE ME WORK AND PLENTY OF IT 



ARLONE JOHNSON 

INGENUE^OUBRETTE WITH SIM WILUAMS' "RADIO GIRLS" — THIS WEEK, MINER'S EMPIRE, NEWARK, 

N. J.— NEXT WEEK, EMPIRE, BROOKLYN 

WILL TALK BUSINESS FOR NEXT SEASON 



BURLESQUE ROUTES 



COLUMBIA ciRcurr 

BOlr Wataon Beef Trrut— YorkviUe, New York. 
23-28; Oipheam. Patenon, 30-Mar 5 (close). 

Boa Tons — Columbia. New York. 23-28; Casino, 
Bnoklyn. SO-Uaj S; Empire, Newark, 7-12. 

Broadway Brevities — Garetr. Pittsburg. 23-28; 
Colonial, Clereland. 30-May 5; Empire, 
Toledo, 7-12. 

BowcTT Barleaqoen — Star & Garter, QiicaBO, 
23-2|. . • . 

Bobble Bobble — Empire, BrooklTn, 23-28; Em- 
pire, Newark, 30-Mar 5. 

Chuckles of 1923— Gayety, Detroit, 23-28 
(close). 

DaTC Marion's Own Show — Colonial, Cleveland, 
23-28; Colombia, New York, May 7 (in- 
definite). 

Flashlights of 1923 — Casino, Boston, 23-28: 

Hortig & Seamons, New York, 30-May 5. 
Follies of the Day — Gayety, Washington, 23-28; 

Gayety, Boston, May 7 (indefinite). 
Cissle*— C^yety, Boston. 23-28; (^lumbia. New 

York, 30-May 5; Casino, Brooklyn, 7-12. 
Greenwich Villase Review — Hurtig & Seamon's, 

New York. 23-28; Miner's Bronx, New York. 

30.May 5. 

Hipptty Hop— Empire, Providence. 23-28; Gayety. 
Boston. SO-May 5. 

Jimmy Cooper's Beauty Review — C^ino. Brook- 
lyn. 23-28; Casino. Boston, 30, (indefinite.) 

Knick Knacks — Open 23-28; (dyety, St. Lonis, 
30, Blay S. Star and Garter, (Hiicago, 7-12; 
Gayety, Detroit, 14-19. 

Lefa Go— Casino, Fbiladelpbia, 23-28; Palace, 
Baltimore. 30-May 5; Gayety, Washington, 
r-12. 

Maids of America — Gayety, Kansas City, 23-28 
(dose). 



Mimic World — Palace, Baltimore, 23-28; (^yety, 
Washington, 30-May 5; Empire, Brooklyn, 
7-12; Empire, Newark, 14-19. 

Mollie Williams' show — (^yety, St. Louis, 23-28; 
(close). 

Radio Girls — Empire, Newark, 23-28; Empire, 

Brooklyn, 30-May 5; Miners' Bronx, 7-12. 
Rockets— Olympic, Cincinnati, 23-28; Gayety, 

Detroit, 30-May 5; Gayety, Buffalo, 7-12. 
Step On It — Miners' Bronx, New York, 23-28; 

Yorkville, New York. 30-May 5; Casino, 

Brooklyn, 7-12. 
"Sliding" Billy Watson. Fun Show — G^jctj, 

BoSalo. 23-28 (close). 
Social Maids — Empire, Toledo, 23-28; Gayety, 

Boffalo, 30-May S; llurtig & Scmon'a, New 
■ York, 7-12. 

Talk of the Town — Columbia, Chicago. 23-28; 

Star and Gaiter, Chicago, 30-May 5; Gayety. 

Detroit. 7-12; (dycty, Buffalo. 14-19. 
Wine. Women and Song — Orpheum. Paterson. 

23-28; Empire. Providence, 30-May 5. 



CLIFF BRAGDON ILL 

Chicago, 111., April 19.— Cliff Bragdon, 
principal comedian of the "Chuckles of 
1923," was talcen ill last Sunday with ton- 
silitis and unable to appear. Sam Rice, 
manager of the company, played his part 
and did satisfactorily. It wasn't so many 
years ago that Rice was principal comedian 
on the old Empire Circuit. He has been 
managing shows for Barney (3erard the 
past six years. 



BOOKED FOR BUOU 

Lou Redelsheimer booked the following 
for the Bijou, Philadelphia, this week: 
(jcorge Hart, Bob Oillins, Lew Brown, 
Tilne Oare, Babe Quinn, Jackie Addison 
and Brown and Gilmore. For the Folly, 
Baltimore, he booked Johnny (jrosby, Sam 
Raynor, Tom Phillips, Mabel Qark, Grace 
Gbodale and Goldie Mandell. 



HOPWOOD WRITES NEW FARCE 

Wagenalls and Kemper received a cable 
from Avery Hopwood, their pennant win- 
ning playwright, that he has completed a 
new farce that, in his opinion, excels any 
previous effort of his. If the script lives 
up to expectation it will be placed in re- 
hears'al upon his return from abroad next 
week, and thus be represented with a sum- 
mer attraction in town. 

The firm has already accepted a new play 
by Mary Roberts Rhinehart, entitled "The 
Breaking Point," which is a dramatization 
of her own novel of the same name. 



MUTUAL CIRCUIT 

Band Box Review — Majestic, Scranton. 28-May 5. 
Flappers of 1923 — Gayety, Brooklyn, 28-May 5. 
French Models — SUr, Brooklyn,, 2S-May 5. 
Hello Jake Girls — open 2S-May S. 
Ja2X Time Review — open 2&-May 5. 
Lid Lifters — Majestic, Albany, 28-May S. 
Mery Whirl — Lyric, Newark, 28-May 5. 
Midm'te Maidens— open 2B-May S. i ^ 

Miss New York Jr. — Howard, Boston, 28-IIal^ S. 
Step Along — Broadway, Indianapolis, 2S-Ma^ 5. 

GILBERT WITH "RADIO GIRlls" 

Billy Gilbert will again be witn Sim 
Williams' "Radio Girls" next seasom- 

i 



CARR WITH "BON TONS" 

Buffalo, N. Y., April 14.— Burton drr, 
straight man, opened with the "Bon Tons" 
at the Gayety here this week. Carr was 
with Jack Reid's "Record Breakers" on 
the Columbia circuit this season. This show 
closed in Kansas City last Saturday night. 



BALLET FOR MARION SHOW 

One' of the features of tiie Dave Marion 
Summer show now being prepared for a 
Simimer run at the C^ltmibia Theatre will 
be "The Ballet Supreme," which will en- 
list the services of Alice O'Loughlin, Dor- 
othy Gray, Ethel Lynn, Rita Winnie, Alice 
Vidor, Cienevieve and Alice Diker. 



NEW THEATRE FOR BAY CITY 

A new theatre to be called the Orpheum 
will be erected in Bay City, Mich., by W. 
S. Butterfield and associates. Seating 
capacity of the new house will be 1,600 
and ground will be broken by July 1st. 
Plans call for its con^pletion on or before 
January 1st, 1924. 



STOCK FOR B'KLYN HOUSES 

The Gayety, and Star, Brooklyn, will go 
into stock May 21 according to the present 
arrangements. The following shows are 
booked at the Star in the meantime: 
French Models, Midnite Maidens, Miss 
New York, Jr., and Girls Ala Carte. 



KETTERING TO DO "THE CRASH" 

Ralph Kettering, Chicago plaj-wright and 
publicist, will enter the producing field 
with a new play from his own pen entitled, 
"The Crash." The piece will have an 
early showing in Chicago, with a New 
York appearance to follow. 



STARS OF BURLESQUE 



THE. PHONOGRAPH STAR 
Boilesqiie's Best Blues Singer 



LYDIA HARRIS 



Doing Specialty with 

JIMMIE COOPER and his "BEAUTY REVUE" 

CoInmbU Clicult 



JUVENILE STRAIOfT. Banor CmnTo ToUas ef «m Vmf 
diBcv^ wv^r dkrtbn and pte^ *D parts i null ad far a (ood JuntiHa stowlf 



HARRY ANDERSON 



, wttk Pbck * KsS, HlppltT Hep Co. 



BETTY BURROUGHS 



DAINTY, DASHINC S0UBRE:TTE 



JIMMIE COOPER'S BEAUTY REVUE 



BILLY KOUD 

PRODUCER 
OOUUMBIA THEATSE BLDO, NEW YORK. TELEPHONE BRYANT MM 



April 25. 1923 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



25 



OFFERS ENTERTAINED FOR NEXT SEASON 









Sid — Clipper— April 11, 1923: 

A high class act was presented by Cleora, a classical 
dancer. Miss Cleora appeared in a gorgeous gold cape, 
which was removed just before goinff into her act, 
showing a magnificent Egyptian costume. Cleora then 
danced, her offering being an artistic Egyptian dance, 
which is a classic. The mction of her hands and arms 
and the grace she displayed in alt her movements was 
wonderful. There is nothing suggestive about her 
act, but instead it is high class art. 



WITH 



J. 



SIM WILLIAMS 
RADie GIRLS 



(Sarpanltno Danoar) 

THIS WEEK— MINER'S EMPIRE, NEWARK. N 
NEXT WEEK— EMPIRE, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 
WEEK MAY 7— MINER'S BRONX, NEW YORK 

p. S. — Much of my auccau Uiu •easoB, u due to Uw mbU 
direcliiiK of our MoucbI Diraetor, WILUAM E. BAKKER. 

Permanent Addnxs: N. V. A. Club, 229 W. 46Ui SL, New York 



GEORGE SHELTON 



COMEDIAN 



Engaged for BOBBY CLARK'S and PAUL McCULLOUGH'S New Columbia Circuit Show for next season. 

Thanks to other managers for offers. 



AUractions at Gty Theatres 



BELASCO 



W. 44l]> St. ETg*., &20 
Hati. Thnr*. ft Sat. 230 



DAVID BFI ASCO P 11 

Lenore Ulric 



as KIKI 



A Clkuaclu Stiufy 
fay Andre Plcxrd 



B. F. Kalth'a 



Broadwar and 47th St. 

PALACE "^r/ 

PR&EMINENT 

INTERNATIONAI. ENTERTAINMENT 

ALL STAR PROGRAMME 
BROOKLYN THEATRES 

Casino Theatre 
BEAUTY REVUE 

Next Week— BON TONS 

Empire Theatre 

Ralph Avaaua end Braadway 

BUBBLE BUBBLE 

Next Week— RADIO GIRLS 

^ rri a jy Jay m-. Futai St. Mat. 

O 1 /\ rV Dally. T«L THaocte 4m 

FRENCH MODELS 



Gayety Theatre r^d«y 
Flappers of 1923 



FIRST SHOW ON COUTTS CIRCUIT 

Frankie Hunter and his "Jamboree 
Girls" is the first show to open on the new 
John E. Coutts Tabloid Circuit. This show 
opened at the Plaza, Bridgeport, on Mon- 
day of tliis week. Hunter closed hJs bur- 
lesque season at the Empire, Brooklyn, last 
Saturday night This show is booked for 
the Bristol Theatre, Bristol, next week. 

Lou Powers in the "Greenwich Village 
Girls" will open on May 7. Charles Bragg 
Revue is now in rehearsals and Mark Lea 
and his "Rosebuds" are at Connersville this 
week. 

Other tabloids will be organized shortly 
by Eddie Dale and Ray Read, as well as a 
number of other well-known stars. There 
are thirteen shows either playing or under 
way and each week finds new organizations 
signed. None of the star.' or shows have 
ever been in tabloid before and the new 
circuit is exacting a standard that is sur- 
prising for that form of amusement. Many 
new theatres were added to the circuit last 
week, giving the shows a substantial route 
for the Summer. 

Coutts will lAve New York next week 
to look over new houses and will lay his 
plans and ideas before house owners and 
managers of his new exchange. 

FRIEDEL AND MACK IN ACT 

Scotty Friedel and Ernie Mack, who 
closed with "Jingle Bells" in Poughkeepsie 
last Saturday night, will open in vaudeville 
Thursday at the De Kalb,, Brooklyn. 

They will do their specialty they have 
been doing in the show this season. 

"FOLLOW ME" FOR LTfRIC 

Newark. N. J., April 23.— L M. Wein- 
garten's "Follow Me," a colored show is 
booked for the L>-ric, this city, the week 
of May 6. This house is playing the Mu- 
tual burlesque shows. 

"HIPPITY HOP" FOR YORKVILLE 

"Hippity Hop" will play Yorkville 
Theatre the week of May 7. This is an- 
other week added to the time. 



WIEDHOEFT AT THE CAPITOL 

Rudy Wiedhoeft, saxophone virtuoso, 
received an unusual honor last week when 
he had his name appear in lights at the 
Capitol Theatre, where he had been- en- 
gaged to render saxophone solos as a spe- 
cial attraction. It is unusual for an in- 
strumental soloist of any kind to get head- 
line billing at this theatre and for a 
saxophonist to appear is unprecedented. 



HALLETT IN HARTFORD 

Mai Hallett and his orchestra opened 
Monday night at Lc Hal Tabarm, Hart- 
ford, Conn. Hallett has been engaged 
to appear here for the entire summer, but 
in the Fall will return to New York in 
one of the local cafes or dance halls. It 
is probable that Hallett will open offices 
as he ha$ interests which include several 
orchestras besides his own. 



BUSY SUNDAY FOR STODDARD 

Harry Stoddard and his orchestra put 
in a busy day last Sunday, playing at the 
Jefferson Theatre, doubling at the New 
Amsterdam Sunday concert and playing 
for a benefit at the N. V. A. Stoddard's 
band has been booked for vaudeville a 
good many weeks in advance and will play 
at the Riverside Theatre the week of 
June 4. 



SILVERS FOR KEITH HOUSES 

Frank Silvers' Roman Gardens Orches- 
tra, of which Harry Walker is business 
manager, appeared at Hurtig and Seamon's 
Theatre Sunday preparatory to going on 
a tour of the Keith houses. 

Silvers' Orchestra last week had the 
honor of playing for the songwriters' din- 
ner which was held at Murray's. 



BURNET AT CHANTECLER 

Charles "Tiny" Burnett, leader of the 
orchestra in the Moore Theatre, Seattle, 
Wash., is also conducting the orchestra at 
the Palais de Danse, Chantecler Cafe, in 
that city. Burnett has an excellent repu- 
tation in Seattle and the engagement at the 
Chantecler is one of the best in the town. 



MILLS WITH WESTPHAL 

Chicago, April 21. — William Mills, for- 
merly head of the Ernie Young Orchestra, 
is now a member of Frank Westphal's 
Rainbo Orchestra. Mr. Mills just recently 
returned from Detroit where he headed an 
organization of his own. 



FRANK CONROY IN STOCK 

Frank Cbnroy who appeared in Porter 
Emerson Brown's plajr "Sold" on its pre- 
liminary tour has withdrawn _ from the 
cast and will on April 23 join AL H. 
Woods and George Marshall's dramatic 
stock company at the Belasco Theatre, 
Washington. 

SADIE BANKS IN ACT 

Sadie Banks, who closed with the "Step 
Lively Girls" several weeks ago in Wor- 
cester, will next week appear in a Wg 
vaudeville act .of fourteen people. The 
act will be known as Marty Brooks pre- 
sents Sadie Banks with "Come Along. 

'XAUGHIN' THRU" FOR SCRANTON 

Manager Abbott of the "Laughin* Thru" 
Company, has made arrangements to book 
his show at the Majestic Scranton, the 
week of May 7. His contract is with 
Harry Spagnola. who, it seems, has leased 
the house. 

mCKS AT THE POLO GROUNDS 

Johr. Hicks, bandmaster, was in charge 
of Patrick Conway's Band, which played 
at the opening of the Giants at the Polo 
Grounds last week. 



STOCK AT THE JACQUES 

Watebbusy, CbniL, April 23.— The 
Jacques Theatre opened today with stock 
burlesque produced by Peck and Kolb of 
New York. 



26 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 25, 1923 



V <=> rvj "T I 

TERRIFIC NOVELTY COMEDY HIT 






with the greatest Comedy Lyric ever wnritten by BILLY JEROME 
AN OVERNIGHT WALLOP 1— GREAT FOR MALE— FEMALE— DOUBLES— TRIOS OR QUARTETTES. WRITE OR WIRE FOR YOUR COPY TODAY! 



^ HARRY VON TILZER MUSIC PUB. CO. _ 

ADDRESS 719 SEVENTH AVE., NEW YORK ADDRESS 



VAUDEVILLE BILLS 

(CnrttHMd from pagt 21) 



Kit* * WIItT— Stonr * Clufc— Noodle* r«isa 
—Jala HMthor * Co.— Pilo * Polat— Blcbmrtra 
TWlBik 

cutt, wo, 

I« Bmfebart Co. — Plarca A Ooff- Kouer A 
B«U€7 — Tbaten — Battr A Loa H*rt — Major 



Bok^ T^—.- — Wud & Doolei — Mortso k. Ud- 
DOtte— Tack Ooldle— aarta &I(erlana— Ban** A 

ACTS ACTS 

VINCENT VAUENHNI 



AUAVT, V. T. 

(Braod Halt)— Uarloo'i Do(i — Van ft Tyion — 
rot PltT Bake— Eddie HlUer Co.— Paalette & Bar. 

TT.TTaiHTU IT, X, 

(Second Half)— DrlKoU. Ung ft Hotbel — Cber 
ft Brej — Beron Oajlord Co. — Oco. Telmao IJsde — 
Haiel Cnab7 Co. 

XT. VXUOV, V. T. 
(Smod Halt)— Tilxle rrlaann— Cratu ft Bale7 
— Blllj Hagtaea Co. — Wm. Monla. 

■ZWftSZ, V. J. 
Pmotar'a— <3Da Edwarda* Bane — Jana* ft Wba- 
len— McOevltt, KellT ft Qolno— Jack Uttle— Bobln 
ft Hal — Hartley Power 0». — Powell ft Brown. 



ACTS 



n 

ACTS 



POU CIRCUIT 

WaA of April 23. 1923 
■BioespoBT, con. 

FaUaa (Becood Halt) — Dnon ft Dare — ludaoa 
C^a— Mt Baoaaj^DaTla ft Pelle. 

digital — g'Ji""'^ ft naher — Jerona BCana — 
ge^kla FaMiiili — Baca ft Bdsc — Hanr Bajdan Co. 
—Baa Wakb-BadaU Natall Co. 

KAaxroMD. oon. 

lalaa* (Bacoad Halt)- Follant— Oao. HePferiand 
Ce. — HaiBlea ft Bmr. 

Otlitd (Secoad Half)- Haidr Bna Pellla ft 

Lany— Janr ft Plans Oltla— Jcnea ft Jonea— Ban 



VKW KAT^H, COra. 
TUaa* (Second Halt)— Ballla Dno— WUIa ft 
Babin — Ban ft O'Brien— Frank Bnah — Btamaid'a 



OajtoB ft Clartao— North ft Kanar— Cbaa. Ibck 
ObL — Mack ft Btaatoa — Uptown ft Downtown. 

taMAMwm, PA. 

PaH'a (Second HaU)— Komi' Kalams Co.— OoU 
ft DaOr- Wdl« FoT ft nmllT— Beth Ikta— Toobc 
Waas Oo. 



Vabaa (Beccad Halt)— Andenon ft Tral — Bojle 
ft^anaatt— Thantoa ft Bqoliea — Tour Bnon Olria 
I Bazotatta. 



WAxnannrr, oonr. 

Palaaa (Baeood Bait) — Cbaoc ft UoeT- ParreU 
ft Batcb— Maniad A<aln— Caledonia Fdu^TIum 

Whlitwlada. 

WILKEB^AUZ, PA. 

PalTa (Baeond Bait)— Bn(a ft Boaa— Eraottl ft 
Hana»— Neath ft Bonth— tan ft Uarla— Vincent 



F. F. PROCTXMt 
of April 23. 1923 



BCBZBEOCAST, V. T. 
(Second Halt) — Foar American Acea — Keoaedr 
ft Kramer — Balle ft Boble — Eanr I4. Cooper Co. — 
Batler ft ftrker — Dorca'a Operalorne. 

TBOT, S. T. 
(Second Bait) — Werner Amoroa Trio — Harrla ft 
Vaoghn — Gold ft 8on«bInc — InU Broa. — London 
Bteppaia. 

YOnXBB, V. T. 

(Second Baltl— Noel Leater Co.— Paol Bjrdell Co. 
— Jnat Ont of Knlcken — Becnaid ft Oanrr. 



MU'a (Baeood Bait) — Kmma Byvon Co. — B. ft 
K. lAjd«— nnii ft Lai ai a Anatol rrladland Ca 



B. 



F. KEITH BOOKING EXCHANGE 
Week of April 23. 1923 

SEW TORK OITZ 

Broadway — Bonawar Fcrar — Lydla Banr — Sllva 
Bian CD.— Uam Serern Co. — Sellj ft PoUock. 

JaffaiaoB (Second Halt) — C. ft M. Dnabar — 
Doyle ft Cheater— Fred Harrlion Co. — Una (Hayton 
Co. — Ulctaoa Braa. 

Baaant (Second Halt) — Jack Wllaon Co.— Cboy 
Ling Hee Ttanpe — Lee ft Cranston — Morgan ft Bin- 
der — Uartba Prron. 

Collunm (Second Halt) — Irene Bleaido — Van ft 
Schenck — Nathan* ft Bally. 

TruUlB (Second Half)— WUUama ft Delay- 
Jcaala Bced — Barry Brown — Cook ft Cliff Orcbea- 
tia. ' 

Hamilton (Second Bait)— BlcRlna ft Batea— 
Well*, Tliglnia ft Weat— Mary Hijnea— Sherwln 
Kelly. 

BBOOXLTH, K. T. 

flntbnah — Freda ft Anthony — CamllUa Broa. — 
Victor Uoor* Co. — MIsnon— Ilortoo ft Olau — ^WU- 
kena ft Hnghc*. 

Pnapaat (Second HaU) — Baymond WUber — 
Koraa ft Ooldner — Seed & Aoatlu. 

KlTaim (Second Rait)— TanderMlta— Beathot ft 
Mas^ngcr — Storm — Baymond ft Mackay. 

OfaaspelBt (Second Half) — Murray ft Alan — 
Claude ft Marlon — Noel Leater Co. 

Far Tnnkiway (Second Halt)— Manhattan So- 
ciety OrcheotiB — Morray ft Oakland. 

Haadarson'a. Conay Z.]nnd (Second Halt) — Srlc 
PhUllpa Co. — Copld'a Cloae Upa — Donoran ft Lee. 

ALmXOWV, H, T. 
Orpheona (Second Halt) — Tbtee Klrkllloa — Nixon 
ft Sana — Brown ft Blateta — Anna Francta ft Co. 

AXBTDSAJC, H. T. 
BlalU (Second Ball)- The Newmana— Eddie 
Caasady — Tkpa— Wayne ft Warren— Ibacb'a Entet- 
talnera. 

ASBUBT PAXX, V. J. 
Xaln 8ti«at (Second Half)— Dann ft Scott- 
Dorothy Cameron Co. — Barrett ft Conneen — Come- 
backa. 



AVBUBir, V. T. 
Jaffaraon (Second Bait) — Melroy Slatera — Man- 
nlng ft Hal — Harry May— Johnny Coalon. 

BATOmrE, H. J. 
(Second Balf)— Bernard ft Beta— Lew Bice — 
Jack HcKenna Co. — Calrln ft O'Connor — Beren 
Porple Olrli. 

BOBTOH, XABB. 

Beaton— Bohn ft Bohn — Fargo ft White — Ellia- 
beth Brlcc — Babcock ft Dolly — Dnckrldge Casey. 

BoOUay Bq.— Uailne ft Bobby — Leon ft Dawn — 
Sabbott ft Brooka — Al Shayne— Uia ft Shuffling 
Sextette. 

Waihlngton Bt- Bogga ft WeUa— BaWea— Ud- 
dell ft Qlbaon — Boyal Gaacoync*. 

BIVOHAJfTOV, W. T. 
(Second Half)- The King 3toa. — The Dance 
Gambol — Singing Tbm — Glbaon ft Price. 

BBASFOBS, PA. 
(Second Half) — Tbe Bam Bama— Ooolet ft Ball 
— Benaea ft Balrd — SU Anderaon Slatera. 

BROCKIOH, MASS. 

Stand (Second Halt)— Van CeUo ft Maiy— Arch 
Stanley — Allen ft Canfleld — WlUlama ft nylor — 
Lonlie Lore ft Co. 

Ootdon'a (Second Half) — Bnma ft Allen — Polly 
ft Ot— Flnk'a Hnlea. 

CAJCBBIOOE, XASB, 
Antral Square (Second Half)- LaToya Modela 
—Norwood ft Ball— Victor Byde'a FOlUea. 

OABTOH, OHIO 
Welgand xyoope — Weaton ft Young — Victor 
Oraff — Thank Ton, Doctor — Helen Storer — Nana 
AleiU. 

CABSOHSAU. PA. 
Xtrlng (Second .Half) — Jooeph Bankln — Bowe ft 
Bowe — Margaret Ford— Law Seymour Co. 



W« 

RW TDBK (nil 
Itnk Aiiana (Second Halt)— Clark Bergman 
Jean La Chnaa— Bnma ft l^nn — Ferry Corway — 

-Jotei B. Hyner Co. — Smytba ft Jamea. 

■U atnai (Second Bait)— Clown Seal— New- 

hoff & Fbtlpv-Staiiley. Wllioa ft EcOy— Old Tlm- 



Utk Btiaat (Second Half)— KeUnm ft O'Daia — 
Dnria Hardy Co. — Sterllnga — Borke, Barton ft 



. UHk Bt. (Saeaad Half)— Ben Bemle ft Band— 
Tatna ft Chiaai Weill* PnDer Co. — Paol Nolan 
Cla (Iwiliia Baaer— Fmer ft Bnnn. 



MADISON'S i Q 
BUDQETN0.I O 

Hf Utcat and smtMt Una; aad tkal^s 

Contents ( nf^pil ff as * 

fflt of btl|ltt ffsf^SflV 
_ Cor two lulaa, maA lor 

male a«d female, para^^aa^ 330 ain^ 
minatnl fini puti vtth finals & akaliik 
for Ccmr pcopl^ a ♦■"^ faraa ior ofaa 
dtandera* etc* Sand ymr dflBir to 
L. J. K. HEIU Bcatana Miaijir al 
MABOOWS BUbCET. MB TUrf A«» 
Boau Naw Yai*. 



B, PA. 

Adgamant (Second Bait) — MorUn ft Doran — 
Maurln Englln— Sinclair ft Gaaper — Little Drlft- 
wood- Bedmond ft WeUa— LaFleor ft Portia. 

CLABXSBVBO, W. VA. 
(Second Half)- HaUen ft Day— NeUla V. 
Nlchola — Lew Wilson — Pot Ponnl. 

" EABTOH, PA. 
Abl* Opera Hsnsa (Second Halt) — F^iran ft 
Bnna— Jnata Marshall Bene — Kelso Broa. Co. — 
DeUale. 

ZLMJXA. B. T. 
(Second Half) — T^lcr ft St. Clair — Conn ft 
Bart — ^Townsend Wilbur Co.- Morrla ft Bbaw — 
Bostoek'a Biding School. 

FAU, XTTEB, XASB. 
Empire '(Second Balf) — Blanche Sherwood ft 
Bcol — O'Brien ft Joaephlne — Wm. Slato — Dreea 
Bebeanal — Mollen ft Fianda — Bra Fay. 

FITCHBUBa, MAS& 
Cnmmlnga (Second Halt)— Hlnkle ft Mac — 
Johnny Neff— B* Tourself— EUdna, FUI ft Elklna. 

OLOVEBBVnXE, V. T. 
(Second Halt)— Cana ft Lehn— Earl ft Matthewa 
— Shater. Weyman ft Cstt — Keleo ft Denont — 
Bermuda Boond. 

OKEQfBBTnia, PA. 
(Second Half)— B. A. Bolfe Bene. 

KABBIBBirB(}, PA. 
Kajaatlo (Second Half)— Chas. Wltben Co.— 
Boward & Brockmau — Ben Meroff Co. 

KAVEBHZLL, MASS. 
Oalonlal (Second Balf) — AUman ft Howard — 

Lehigh Delacy Co Joe Roberta — Hometown Fol- 

Uea. 

HAZELTOH, PA. 
Feelsy'a (Second Half)— J. ft H. Shields- 
Clayton ft Clayton — Tom Kelly. 

HOLTOKE, KABS. 
(Second Half)— York ft Mlndella— Frltal Scbeir 
— Jo* DarCT — Domey ft Clarldga. 

"""WTTT. H. T. 

(Second Half) — Frank ft E. Carmen — Relene 
MorettI— Dobba ft Watklns— Loray. 

ITEAOA. H. T. 
(Second Half) — Larimer ft Bodaoa — McFarland 
& Palio— Eddie Stanley Trio— Frlaco RarmonlBta. 



JAMEBTOWB, V, T, 
(Second Half) — Slatera Araetce — Adams ft 
Thomas — Ten Daya — Walmsley ft Keating— Bey- 
nolda Douegan Co. 

JEBSET OITT, H. J. 

Manilla Broa.- Ounley ft Merrill— Nelson ft 
Bailey. 

JOHHBTOWH, PA. 
(Second Balf)— Ulllan ft B. Zelger— Darls ft 
Dayne — Lynn ft Lockwood — Great Johnson — 
Harold Backman Band — Betty Bruce Co. 

STANLEY AGENCY 

SPECLAUZINC SUBURBAN HOMES AND 

INSURANCE OF ALL KINDS 
Mt -nmaa BUg, N. Y. TaL Biy t BOB 

LABOABTEB, PA. 
Colonial (Second Half)— Witt & Winters— Ade- 
laide Bell Co. — Claudle Colemsn. 

lAWBEHCE, MABS. 
Empire (Second BalC) — Jabrle ft George — Jane 
Dillon— Prauklyn ArdcU Co.— Dixie Four— Artistic 
Treat. 

LEWIBTOH, HE. 
Muslo Hall (Second Balf)— Joe Danllea— Clay- 
ton ft Clayton— Force ft Williams — Pboudell Four. 
LOHO BBAJfCB, V. J. 
Broadway (Second Bait) — Bob ft Tip— Mabel 
Burke Co.- Lee ft Mann— Virginia Sereaadere. 
LTBS, MASS. 
(Second n.lf)— Parlalah Trio — asrtmd* Barnes 
— Alexander ft Flelda — Teddy (^li« Co. 

MtnCEEBPOBT, PA. 
(Second Balf) — Samstcd ft Marlon — Lew 
Bawklna — Malsle Strange 0>.— Bawthorne ft <^k 
— Bhnra Bolowa Co. 

MAHCEEBTEB, B. K. 
Palaoa (Second Halt)— Laura ft B. Dreyer — 
Bnl* ft O'Brien— Howard ft White — Janet of 
France — Four Casting Stan. 

]CEAJ>V1Z.LE, PA. 
(Second Half)— Osidner ft Aubrey— Barto ft 
Clark— Jamea J. Morton— Malsle, Helen ft Oalse. 
mSDLZIOWB, OHIO 
Oorden — Edonards — Palmer ft Huston — Kec Too 
Foot— The Diamonds. 

MOHTBEAL, OAV, 
loparial — Elly— Praalnl — Willie SoUr — Arthur 
Deroy <V>.— Dsrls ft Wopler— McOerltt, Kelly ft 
Qulun. 

XOBBIBTOWV, V. J. 
Thirty Pink Toes— Jones ft Johnson. 

BABTICOKE, PA. 
State— Young ft Wheeler— Cbaa. Keating Co.— 
Tbe Drag Clerk. 

HEW BESFOBS, XASB. 
Olympla -(Second Half)— Hill ft Hull— Potter ft 

Gamble — Dare FeigUK>n Co Jonn ft Ray— Danny 

Dugan Co. 

BEW BSITAIH, COBB', 
(Second Half)— Meredith ft Snooaer— Cheater ft 
DcTcre — Johnny Clark Co. 

BEW BBVHSWIOK, V. J. 
Blalta (Second Half)— John Le (nalr^Walsh. 
Beed ft Walsh — Hoody ft Duncan — Singer Mldgeta. 
HEW LOHSOB, COWl. 
(Second Half)— Dashlngton'a Doga— To Jo Doo- 
'v—fSnj ft Old Bose— The Jangle Bungalow. 



DRY CLEANED 

Theatrical Gowns and Costumes 
Repaired and Dry Oeaned 

OVERNIGHT 

We Work While You Sleep 
Gowns Called for After the Show 
Delivered Before Noon Next Day. 

PHONE CIRCLE 9104 
OVERNIGHT CLEANERS 

at 756 Tib Avoiaa 
Betwaea «tfa mai SMi Sirwta. 



April 25, 1923 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



27 



NOW! 



ENGAGE OR WRITE Dan Sherman for COTTAGE FUR- 
NISHED UP HIGH IN THE CATSKILLS. On the BANKS 
OF A BEAUTIFUL LAKE, 2,000 Ft. Elevation. Good 
Fishing, Boating and Bathing. Blankets All Summer. 
Write Qaiek. DAN SHERMAN, Sherman Lake, Davenport 
Center, N. Y. 



HO. ABAHS, lUSS. 
(SMood Half)— Valdt Co.— Nan Dawn— Anser 
& Ftckei— Bowera, Walteta & Crooker. 

HORWTCH. v. T. 
Scaolon. Dcnoo Broa. & ScaDlon — Van Baldwin 
Trio. 

OHEOHTA 
(Second Hair)— JuTenlle Fnllct. 

FAS8AI0, V. t. 
(Second Half)— Mlldrad Parker— Telaak & n<an 
— Nearljr Uarrled— Frankl; Faraum— BnlS Ic El- 
ton. 

PATEBSOV, V. t, 

Majaatlo (Sactind Salt)- Indoor Sporta— Monroe 
Broa, — Paramount Fonr. 

FAWTVOXET, B. I. 
(Second Half)— w™. Dick— Soatbem Fonr — 
Bobart Henr7 Bodtt — Hanlon A Howard. 

pHILADEtPHIA, PA. 
Karatona— B07 i Boyer— Bbaw * Lea — Pan- 
theoa A Slater*— JImmj Lncaa Co.— Maoriea Dia- 
mond Co. 

OamutawB— <3rella Co.— Uellnda & Dade — 
—Taylor, Howard A Thoni— Adanac Qoartette — 
Yea Meana No— Ulle. Hodlate. 

Wm. Fann (Second Half)— BIII7 Beard— Ander- 
aoo A aravea— Demaraat A C«llete— Herbert'a 
Doga. 

Orand— Florence Bradj- I.eaTltt A Lockwood. 
pmsBrao. PA. 

Victoria— Vee A Tullj- lamey A Pearaon— 
Auatln A Cole — Marie Sparrow— Morria A Tbwnea 
— Thte* Barlnaa— Cnedon A DaTia— Tba Qllded 
Cace. 

PITTSBVBOH, PA. 
Sheridan Banara (Second Half) — Ber^rt Denton 
Co.— Nan Ttmrellne— Wlilte. BUck A Uieleaa— 
Ulni <>ipld— Van A Belle— Ward A OIlTer. 

PirrSFIELD. KAS8. 
' (Second Halt)— Amy Dean (%.— Lane A Harper 
— Elaine A Uarahall — Tom Howard A Lyona. 

PLAIXTIELS, N. J. 
PUtnAaU (Second Half)— laa. A E. Jamea— 
Ohaa. B. Stowe— Drew A Valllc — Lydell A Macy 
— Adroit Broa. 

BEASIHO, FA. 
Kajaatlo (Second Half)— Ollbert A Kennedy — 
Zeck A Bandolpb— Bryant A Stewart— Oddltlea ot 
IRK). 

BARATOOA, N. T. 
(.Second Halt)— McDonald A Oakra- Kennedy A 
Knoier — Jennler Broa. 

BO. HoawAUC comr. 

(Second Half)— lAtca Bna. — Wm. Bdmooda Co. 
—Nell McElnley— Fonr Madcapa. 

BTAHFOBS, COHH. 
(Second Half)— Royal Danea— Kerr A Gnalgn— 
Kennedy A Berle— Baall' A Allen— Zemater A 
Smith. 

STEirBim vuxE, o. 

(Second Half) — lotin R. Tan Arnam'a Mlnstrela. 

STRACVSE, H. T, 
(Second Half) — RobloMn & Boyle — Paul Bimdy 
— Stepbcns & Lovejoy— Prlnccu Nil Til T»l— 

Rainbow Sli. 

TBEHTON, H. t. 
Capital (Second Half) — Caton Trio— Wm. Dorn- 
aeld— Tbe Awkward A(e— Batb A SperUnt— Local 
Band. 

VnOA, H. T. 
Colonial (Second Halt)— A. A O. Falla— Flor- 
ence HobaoQ — Kins Tangle — Jarrla A Harrlaon — 
Joe Laurie. 

WATEBTOWH, H. T. 
Olympio (Second Half) — Mnrpby A Bradley — 
Tajler A Robbe— Colden Gate Synco— Uarle A A. 
Clark — Bitter A Knapp. 

WHhULTKO. W, VA. 
(Second Halt) — Victoria — Jobnny Hnrpby — 
Tnoea A Stepa — BorrlaoD A Darling — Fnlry Tale 
Folllea. 

WHITE FUUKB, H. T. 
Lynn — Carr A Brey — Irene Rlaido — Smythe A 
Jamea — Frank Ward — Emily Fltagerald Co. — 
Maker & Bedford. 

WIUailOTOV, SEL. 
Aldlna (Second Half) — Dare Broa. — Bailey A 
Seed— Bailey A Tortei^Brent Bayei— Kenoey A 
Hollla — Bobby Pander Co. 

TOBS. PA. 
Opera Eooaa (Second Half)— Stanley A Elva— 
AnRel A Fnller — Claire Vincent Co. — Four Minora 
— Rupert Ingalccsa Co. 

TOUHOBTOWir, O. 
(Second Halt) — I-ew Wllaon Co. — Ardelle 
(HeaTe*— Florence Reynolda — ^Tbre* Voleea— B« r- 
nnm Waa Blgbt. 



WINST0H4AIXK 

(Second Half)— Clinton Rlaten — Larry Comer— 
Hugb Emmctt A Co. — OMcar Lorraine A Co — 
Tan. ArakI Trio. 

CTHART.OTTE AHD ROANOKE 
Bceman A Grace — Etbel Hopkloa- Tfaornton A 
King— Caitlng Campbella. 

BOABOKE ABS CRABLOTTE 
Brent A Partner — Dooglaa A Earl— Doi«e"a Cele- 
brltlee— Ray A Illlllard. 

HOBPOLX AMD BICBMOUS ' 
Tbe Seebacka— Bert Lery— Pinto A Boyle — Era 
Slilrley A Band, 

BAUUVUJX, TBHT, 
(Sctond Bait)— Harry LaMore A Co. 

CRATTABOOOA, TEW. 
(Second Halt)— Lynn A Tbompaon — Otat Mor- 
gan — Sampaon A Douglas — Pliano A Llndaner — 
Prlncen Wabletka. 

OBEEBYIUX ABS AUOVBTA 
Paull — DeOlyno A Adama — Fr«nk Qnlnn A Co. 
— Joa. Dlekay A Co. — Uovia Haaqnea. 

SAVABVAH ABS /ACXBOBTIIXE 
Rone A Boaa- Green A Parker — Bob Anderson 
A Pony — Texaa Four — Tbomaa A Akera. 



.JACK 

(aBaa TUnay) CkD 19 Sonaat titt at 



JACSBOHTILLE ABS SATABBAH 
Cornell, Leona A Zippy — Combe A Nerlna — 
Robert Rellly A Co.— Rena Arnold A Co.— Wil- 
fred DoBols, 

WEST PAUI BEAOH ABS KAIB 
Oenaro A <3o1d— Dlile Hamilton— Hal A Fran- 
cla — Shrlner A Fitasimmona — Kavanaugb A 
ETerett. 

TAKFA ABS LABELABS 
Hie Mclntyres — Bd. Lowty — Hyama A Evana — 
Sbone A Squires — Beyen Brown Girls. 

BICHKOBS ABS BOBFOLK 
Nlacaboa— Joa. K. Wataon— Ona MnnaoB A 
Boya. 

ATI,ABTA ABS BIBlDHOHAlf 
Frank Wllaon— Bay Snow A Norine — Faya A 
Donnelly — (^Iton A Bellew — Dorothy Byton 
Bene. 

BUJQHOHAIC ABS ATLABTA 
Chas. Ledcger — Biown A Lavell — Browning A 
DaTla— Enbs A Alton— DoUy DaTla BeToe. 

BATOB BOUOE ABS 8HBXTEPOBT 
MaDg A Snyder— Hall A Deiter^McCormlck A 
Wallace — Bobbe A SUrk— Jimmy Joy'a Enter- 
tainer*. 

HEW OBKEABB ABS KOBtLE 
Beeg* A Quepee— Jack Sidney — GUfoyle A 
I^nge — Will A HatT Boger* — Burt A Holtaworth. 

XOBIIB ABS BZW OBIXABS 
DIkoo. Lynch A Olna — Davla A Pradner Jotin 

R. (^)nloa A Co.— Leo Beei*— Alra DeBoaa A Co. 
HASHTIUZ ABS LOVISTIUE 
l^ngfocd A Fredericks — Elm City Fonr. 

UUISTILLE ABS BABHVILLE 
Janla A (^aplow— Lillian Berlein A 0>.— Hunt- 
ing A FrmncLa — (Joaaman Sis ten A Foley. 

HABSVILLE 

(Flnt Halt)— Merritt A Cougblln- Bernard A 
Merritt — Tbe Longdelda. 



CHICAGO KEITH OFTICE 
V/aA of April 29, 1923 

CnrOIBBAXI, OHIO 
Palao*— Tbe Pbllomar*— Egbert Van Alslyne — 
Keller A Bernard — Black-Eyed Busana— Edwards 

A Bealey — Cunnlnbam-Bennett Co. 

GLET^^ABS, 0^30 
Hlppodnms — Jack Hanley — Allen A Kent- 
Barry Rappl. 

SAITOH, OHIO 
Sallh'a (Flrat Halt)— Jean Mlddleton— Lang- 
tord A Fredricka. (Second Halt)— Gaidon A Day 
— Johnny WrfgUt BeTue, 



WeOer's FRENCH 
FOOTWEAR 

SaSutlylN&Mt. Ik Hewot Pari. 
Vairiaa b Spri^-Taa MMk 



MORPHINE 



HARRY WELLER 

793 SlbAr.'^S^ 





Yea, hla make-op la alwaya perfect I 
That's why hla face ia always at iu beat 
in the Ughta of any stag* saitiof I 

Be Sara yoDr andlencaseeB^oa at yoar 
beat. Uaa Lalchner'a Hake-Upl Than 
ara ao many different creaina, palnta, 
powd«n,and Uqaida that yon wUlal way* 
find Juat the maka-ap for yoar part— 
and becania It's Lalchner's yon will ba 
BTira It'a Jnat the fine qoallty yoo want. 
Uaa L«ichner'a— for better make-np. 

At 3n>ar Jiutgut or tappfy Aeoa*. 

TOlUr PUPAMnOMSMdWEAlTUCALnMEUP 

Sole ntaOAotorw: OBO. BOROFBLDT A CO„Utb Strand Irrlng PL, New York I 



SETBOIT, MIUIL, 
La Bell* (hidaa (Flrat Halt)- Ward Baker Co. 
— Pair at Deuce* — Big City Fonr. (Second Halt) 
— Gillette A RIU— Mile. Tanlty (>>.— SUntey A 
McNab. 

ZTABBVILLB, IBS, 
Btnsd (Flrat Halt)— Weber Olrla— Black A 
0*Donnell — Melody A Step* — Poor Vdnnteera — Joe 
MelTln. (Second Halt)— Bary A Earr — Hogbaa 
Duo — Mnrpby A Clark — Bernac* Cima. 

FOBT WATBE, IBS. 
Palao* (Plrat Halt)— Gillette A Blta— Wella A 
Wlnthmp— Stanley A McNab — Venetian PiTe. 
(Second Half)— Boae O'Bara- Bender A Arm- 
atraag. 

HUBTIBGTOB, Xn>. 
HnntlngtaB — Jean Iflddlctown — D* Witt, Bnma 
A T^urenc*. 

IBSIABAPOUa, IBS. 
Palaa* (rlrat Half)— Bs Witt. Bnraa A Tbr- 
renca — Kingaton A Ebner — Gordon A Day — BUI A 
Cameron — A. Alexander Co. (Second Bait) — 
Nlobe — Ftenkl* Kelsey Co. 

lUBOICO, IBS. 
BtiBad (First Halt)— Irene Trerette— Morgan A . 
Oatea — Three Banaida — Al Bums Co. (Second 
Halt)— Joe MelTla — Coulter A Boae — Foot ToIub- 
teera — ^Vlaaor TMo. 

lEZIBeZOH, KT, 
Ban AU (Hrat Half)— Caaaon Broa. A Marie— 
Knapp A Coraelll. (Second Halt) — SeottaerB 
Bcme. 



OHIO 

Fernet 0, E.— Dnlley Braa. — Ward Baker Co. — 
Pair of Dencea— MUIa A Dnncan. 

LOUIBVILUS, KT. 
Hatlonal (Flrat Bait) — Johnny Wright BeTn* — 
Perie Ftank— Nlobe. (Second Halt)— Caaaon Braa. 
A Co. — Knapp A OoraelU. 

PASVOAH, XT. 
Oiphanm (Plrat Halt)— Eary A Eery- Hurphy 
A CUrk— Reddlngton A Grant. (Second Bait)— 
Hughea Duo — Valentin* Vox — Jobnar Bagay Co. . 

BIOmOBS, IBS. 
Mnmy (Flnt Bait)— Lucy Bmeb — Bender A 
A maliu ng — Marie Bnsaell A B. — Ethel Parker Co. 
(Second Bait)— Colllna A Hill— Hamoney A CacU 
— Rnblnl Slatera — Fkancca. Boa* A D. 

'm^v. HABTE, nn>. 
Ubarty (Flnt Halt)— Colllna A Bin— Ben Nee 
One — Bart, Wagner A E. — Vlller Trio. (Second 
Half)— Irene Tlvrette — Melody A Steps — Morgan 
A Gates — Class. Manning A Co. 



OPEN evENiNca 



WESTERN VAUDEVILLE 
WeA of April 29, 1923 
OEiaAao, nx, 

Majaatlo — Anatrallan Axmen — Stuart Glrla — 
Raymond Bond A Co.— Wild A Dooley— Fitch'a 
Mlnatrel<4 — Bob Morphj — Aeroplane Glrla, 

Kadxl* (Flrat Bait)— RoberU A Wllfreda— Bol- 
llday A Wlllette— Sam Lelbert A Co.— Blliott A 
LaTour — Four Glrton Glrla. (Second Half)— Wella 
A WInthrop— Hart, Wagner A Eltla — Jobnny'a 
New Car. 

Lincoln (Second Half) — Ray A Edna Tracy — 
Scbwaris A'.,€llltotd. 

Eaglawsod (Pint Halt)— Catherine Sinclair A 
Co.— Kay A Edna TYacy— Schwarti A CliSoid. 

WANTED AT ONCE 

Strong cornet ist play tuff Suophoae; or 
Baritone preferred; or any other; state which. 
Long season vaadcvUle. Rehearsals now. 

Wire height, weight, age, lowest aalarr. 

F. BROOKS 
Plymouth Hotel. New York City 



(Second Half)— I awton— Tyler A Crolla 
A Hart Betne — Hyama A Mclntyr*. 



-Blekay 



ABEBDEKB, ■. B. 

Orphasnt— NUoa A No r rl a Bell A Vaa. 

BLOOMDieiOV, ILL. 
Xajaatle (Flnt Halt)— Prank Da Voe A Co.- 
MortonJewell Four. (Second B*lt)— JoAa A Mel- 
Ue 01m*. 

BOOBZ, IOWA 
Lyilo— Mack A SaBe— Beckett A Beach. 

OBAjnAioB, nx, 

OrpAanm (Second Half) — Glbaon Slatera A Grady 
Ftaber A Qllmor* — The Floteal*. 

FABOO, B. S. 

Oraad (Flrat Bait)— NUon A Norri*. (Second 
Halt)- Pr*^ nttm— Leooa BaB'a Bene, 

OAIXBBBXa, ILL. 
Orphaun (Firat Halt)— Will J. Ward— r*Teilte* 
at the Past. (Bccnid Haiti— Slanlcy, Doyle A 
Beno—Simpann A Dean — Jordan Glrla. 

GRABS rOBJCa, H, B. 

Orphenm (Friday A Saturday) — Bcrger A 8ea- 

mod. 

OBABD IBLABB, BEB: 
Xajaatlo (Sunday)- De Lorto A Blcharda— BUIy 
MlUer A Co. (Tbnnidaly. Friday A Saturday)— 
Tudor A Stanton — Wallace A Clyde— Tbrc* Mai- 
Tla Braa. 

OBEEH BAT, WS. 
OiphaoB— Dare A Tieaaie — Lambert A Fish 
McGoode I - ensen A Co. 

(.Ctmttmmti e» t*€* 29) 




JUST OUT 

if CNALLVS A 
BULLETIN Il0.0 

Prica, On* Dollar Par Copy 

OfiBtto enUseHea ef 140 pepi «r laa, 
and original raadnlll* eomsdy aatvUL 
awryihing that can b* <r t» tk* )itav, 
■atur vnat sort <£ sn act, 
ni-lB Uli ba uy itqdn, 
MdUni'sBidKttn Noi 8 Is Mnr 1 
bsSsla omlitr Ihso aw WM, 
■aba sf alwan, ana Mltr me e* 
■«MUn MUETII la. Beg 
tog fUt-adK. 9-l»dal* eoBd 

21 (ciuBTia BmiMin. 

poilttw bf^ 

12 NMIIB AST* fir tie Bala. Bcb at ■ 
snplsf vlanv. 

11 nianut, «cn (» mi* aod tania. 

■ak* and an any till. 
» UirniE MNBIES oa dl ar BnaAnTl 
lalsst song hita. 

MUT vcaniunitr mt 

cnlllM Oflsr Ihm"— Ifi a iM, 
■MF-UFTIIG FEBAiX ACT. TUB act h a 1« 
kifai. aae-fce hit 

MTTUia wAmm mt. iu> ■* b aitsi 

■llh tnsr at (ha rIb-lltUlag UaA 
itart t* 

9 CMtiAeiEl lOILEMaE stfUtod "Ckl rif*.' 
Iff b^taht bnar and btfitila ear «IIA att, 

12 ■IMTIEI. FIBT-rAm atlta ' 
iska and bM-staot ma s fli a ool 

CUID ■iSSTIEL FIBAIE lataiad 

Hint" roll or itqtai 

RDIDIEOS or ensa-fe* Jctea tm lldr-nlk oa- 
wntion for l*o mala and Hal* aM fSaala. 

iESIDES other ODOS^ BatBlal wakh Is mM 
ts the laadnCto m t ia a si. 
lentahs th* irto of BeUUTV ■ItUflB 

■a. a li only oe* Mlar tm fan; m am aot 

ma ■SLLETIBI BaL 7 **d • Mr tl-3a sltk 

nowT back goaraiila. 

WM. McNALLY 
81 E. 12Sdi St. New Yoric 



28 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 25, 1923 



SPECHT COMPLAINS TO N. V. A. 

Paul Specfat last week connlained to the 
N. y. A. that material alleged to have been 
originated by him was being plagiarized by 
Dr. Hngo' Riesenfeld in the tatter's act at 
the Palace Theatre. Specht. in a letter to 
Heniy . Chesterfield, stated his case and 
asked that Riesenfeld be stopped from using 
it Specht's letter follows: 
My.Dear Mr. Chesterfield: 

l&der date of December 7, No. 26S6, I 
registered the material plan and outline of 
my jact, which has been followed by me in 
detail since our opening at the Coliseum 
Theatre on December 11, 1922. 

Sipce then there have been several in- 
fringements without any protest from me. 
Last week Dr. Hugo Riesenfeld appeared 
at the Palace with his Rivoli and Rialto 
orchestra and practically duplicated every 
original idea of my act. He not only used 
my idea of interpreting a ]^pnlar American 
nninber as played in foreign countries but 
imitated other protected material 

Please give this matter your Jnunediate 
attention and pot a stop to this leader's 
plagiarism, as legitimate N. V. A. vaude- ' 
ville acts should not suffer from the inva- 
sion of the movie orchestra leaders who 
mitate the vandeville orchestras who gave 
iniudeville patrons "classical jazz" a long 
time ago. 

Thanldng yon, I am. 

Cordially yours, 
(Signed) PAin. Sfecht. 

Specht, who appeared in Baltimore last 
week, having beoi held over for a second 
week, met with considerable success there, 
plajring at the Sbriners' dinner tendered to 
the Mayor of Baltimore, and being the 
guests of the Baltimore Orioles at the 
opening game. 



ORCHESTRA NEWS 



"JOSir' DALY WITH YERKES 

"Josh" Daly, formerly booking manager 
for Hany Ycrkes, after leaving the or- 
chestra directorate for a time to go out in 
advance of Harry Lauder, is now back with 
Yerkes again and will go oat in advance of 
the Happy Six. This Yerkes combination 
was supposed to <^ien in vandeville bnt 
cancelled their time and instead will make 
an all-summer tour that will keep them 
busy np until October IS. 

lite combination, although keeping the 
name "Happy Six," will be increased to 
nine men. After October 15 Yerkes is 
planning to send the men on a concert tour 
m conjunction ' with one or two concert 
siimTS of pronnnacc 

The S. S. Flotilla Orchestra is now play- 
ing its fifth week at Grauman's Theatre, 
Los ^geles, but will return to New York 
shortly and be seen in or around the city 
in a summer hotel iiosition. 



CONWAY FOR WILLOW GROVE 

Patrick Conway and His Band opens 
the Willow Grove Park season on May IS, 
with a four-wedc engagement. John Phil- 
lip Sousa's engagement will terminate the 
season at the park and will be for the final 
five weeks of the season with the exception 
of the last day, which falls on a Sunday 
and on the heels of another date: For the 
final day of the season Sousa has arranged 
to have Francis W. Sutherland and his 
Seventh Regiment Band of New York play 
there in his place. 



SATTERFIELD IN NEW YORK 

Tom Satterfield, who closed last week at 
the Hotel Lorraine, Philadelphia, was in 
New York last week laying his plans for 
the summer. Satterfield, who played at 
Martin's Cafe, Atlantic City, all last sum- 
mer, will return there on May 1 with a 
omdnnation of six pieces. He will keep 
the orchestra at that size until about the 
middle of Jtme, when, if business warraiits, 
he will increase the size of the combinatioii 
to nine or ten men. 

ENSMCETEN 

his Orchestra 

PcTmAXtantiy mi th* 
-ERICAN THEATBE 




CHICAGO PAY RAISE ASKED 

The Chicago Musicians' Union last 
week served notice on the Chicago Sym- 
phony Orchestra that the musicians will 
demand an increase of 25 per cent in their 
salaries next season. The Orchestral As- 
sociation, which manages the affairs of the 
Chicago Symphony, replied that inasmuch 
as it suffered a deficit of $70,000 during 
the past season it is not in a position to 
increase the burden and will be unable to 
meet the demands of the musicians. 

The Chicago Symphony Orchestra was 
founded thirty-two years ago, in 1891, and 
this is the first time since its inception 
that any open differences have occurred 
between the association and the players. 
Salary disputes have hitherto been settled 
amicably by arbitration and in a manner 
considered fair to both sides. 

No contiaas for the coming season have 
been sent out and subscribers have been 
informed that their subscriptions are ac- 
cepted contingent upon there being an- 
other season. After the final concert of 
the season last Sunday the orchestra was 
technically disbanded and the state of af- 
fairs is regarded as serious by all those 
connected with the enterprise. 



LANNIN BACK AT ROSELAND 

Joseph Lannin and his orchestra, direct 
from the Rosemont Dance Hall in Brook- 
lyn, opened at Roseland, New York, on 
Saturday night, following Mai Hallett and 
his orchestra, which combination left for 
Hartford that afternoon. Joseph Lannin 
with his eight-piece combination had been 
appearing at Rosemont for the past two 
seasons and will remain at Roseland as 
long as the business holds up. During the 
Summer both Joseph Lannin's and Sam 
Lannin's orchestras will be partially re- 
duced but both will again be augmented 
when the Winter season starts again. 



CARR FOR ATLANTIC CITY 

Jimmy Carr and his Golden Gate Or- 
chestra, which has been appearing in 
vaudeville both in New York and through 
the Middle West for the past six months, 
last week signed a contract for the El 
Cadia Cafe, Atlantic City, for the coming 
Summer. The El C^dia is the former 
Hotel Blackstoiie Grill, and Carr opened 
there with his present combination early 
last Summer for five weeks and was held 
over for the entire Summer. 



PARKER IN NEW ACT 

Don Parker and his Vernon Coun- 
try Club Orchestra opened in vaude- 
ville Monday, breaking in their new act 
at one of the smaller Keith houses. This 
combination has been together for a num- 
ber of years and formerly appeared under 
the direction of Paul Whiteman, Inc. They 
will appear in vaudeville for several weel^ 
and will then open at one of the local cafes 
for the Summer. 



RAPP ANNOUNCES PLANS 

Barney Rapp, leader of the orchestra at 
the Hotel Chase, St Louis, was in New 
York last week and announced his plans 
for the next six months. Rapp, who was 
booked at the Hotel Chase by the White- 
man offices seven months ago for three 
months and whose contract was twice re- 
newed, has been again held over at this 
hotel and will remain there for six months 
more. The billing of the orchestra has 
been changed from "Paul Whiteman's 
Hotel Chase Orchestra" to "Barney Rapp's 
Hotel Chase Orchestra, Direction of 
United Orchestras, Inc." 

Starting with May 1 the orchestra will 
play on the roof of the hotel, which is 
situated on the tenth floor of the building 
and is capable of holding approximately 
800 couples. All the members of the or- 
chestra live at the hotel, which is opQOStte 
Forest Park, and, in their spare time, play 
golf, tennis, go horseback riding or play 
baseball in the park. A baseball team has 
been formed among the members of the 
orchestra that will play teams from other 
hotels and orchestras. 

Rapp's orchestra has been under -White- 
man management practically since the 
Whiteman offices opened. They formerly 
appeared at the Pavilion Royal and from 
there went to the Boardwalk, where they 
appeared with great succisF until 'they left 
for the Hotel Chase. The orchestra is 
composed of ten men, 'most of them from 
New York. 



ORCHESTRAS OFF LOEW TIME 

Band acts are through on the Loew time 
for the rest of the season and until late 
next Fall, according to booking managers 
in the Loew offices. The executives state 
that the Lp'ew houses have been playing 
several wonderful bands during the past 
season,, including Alex Hyde, Charles 
Strickland, Paul Specht and others of 
prominence and that unless they can get 
an orchestra of unusual merit, a name 
orchestra of national reputation, it would 
be foolish for them to put out any or- 
chestra at all. 
- The claim is made that the bills have 
been over supplied with orchestras in any 
event and that the audiences in Loew 
houses have not showed the same appre- 
ciation of late for acts of this kind that 
they did formerly. Even if an act that 
is a sensation because of its staging or 
name should be engaged for the Loew 
time now it would not prove feasible to 
book it as the business will shortly fall 
off as it usually does during the Summer 
months and the houses will not be able to 
pay the act the salary it should command. 

Next Fall, if the audioices still show 
the same appreciation of orchestra acts, 
five or six acts of this kind will be booked, 
but they will be highly individual, well- 
paid, and devoted entirely to vaudeville, 
with no side work to interfere with the 
theatrical engagement. These acts will be 
sent out, with suitable intervals, over the 
Loew time, the booking managers figur- 
ing in that way the public demand will be 
kept up and the audience made to appre- 
ciate a good orchestra when it appears. 



HAVANA BAND AT COLONIAL 

Lieutenant Felix Fcrdinando and his 
Havana Orchestra opened at the Colonial 
Theatre on Monday night, showing the act 
to downtoun vaudeville patrons for the 
first time. Since the act opened it has 
been considerably changed and now is one 
of the finest orchestra acts, both from the 
point of view of staging as_ well as mu- 
sically, that has been heard in New York 
in some time. The majority of the men 
in the Havana Orchestra have come direct 
from a long run at the Hotel Almandares, 
Havana, Cuba, where they were the sensa- 
tion of the season. 

The orchestra will continue in vaude- 
ville for several wedcs before opening at 
one of the seashore resorts for the Sum- 
mer. Lt. Ferdinando, during the war, had 
the honor of leading the 100-picce band 
at the opening of the Pershing Stadium, 
and directed both . dance orchestras and 
military bands at many of the diplomatic 
and militafy functions in Paris at the 
time. 



LOPEZ FOR BUFFALO 

Vincent Lopez and his Pennsylvania 
Hotel Orchestra will leave the Pennsyl- 
vania Hotel immediately after the show on 
the evening of May 13, take a special train 
and open at Shea's Buffalo the following 
afternoon. They will be headlined for the 
week at Shea's and will then play for the 
official opening of the new Buffalo Statler 
Hotel on the evening of May 19. 



NICHOLS TO DIRECT FOR COHAN 

George Nichols, for many years director 
of the orchestra on the Ziegfeld Roof and 
more lately connected with several musical 
comedies, has been appointed musical direc- 
tor for George M. Oanan's new production,' 
"The Rise of Rosy O'Reilly." and will open 
with that show in Boston early in June. 



RIESENFELD GOING TO EUROPE 

Hugo Riesenfeld, musical director of the 
Rialto and Rivoli motion picture theatres, 
is booked to sail for Europe Wednesday, 
May 25, on the S. S. Paris. He will re- 
main abroad for several weeks taking a 
long deferred vacation. 



FROST BACK FROM BERMUDA 

Chester E. Frost and his orchestra have 
just returned to New York after a suc- 
cessful season of four months at the 
Hamilton Hotel, Hamilton, Bermuda. 
Frost and his six men have been together 
for the past five years under the name of 
Chester jProst's Bostonians and have estab- 
lished an excellent reputation for versa- 
tility. While in Bermuda the orchestra 
was the hit of the season and made a good 
many influential friends. They have been 
asked to return next season and probably 
will do so. Qarc Briggs, cartoonist with, 
the New York Tribune, met Frost in Ber- 
muda and made his orchestra the subject 
of several cartoons which were extensively 
syndicated through the States. 

Frost and his men are spending a week 
at home before coming to New York to° 
begin work on a summer engagement in 
this locality. 



COLEMAN WITH VALENTINO 

Gregory Coleman and his orchestra 
continue to play the one-night tour that 
has been arranged in conjunction with 
Rodolf Valentino and his wife, Winifred 
Hudnut. Last week they played to a 
great crowd in the Armory in Newark, 
and this week are appearing at Fall River 
and through New England. The tour has 
already lasted about four months and is 
booked ahead indefinitely. The orchestra 
. plays for the dancing of the screen favorite 
and also for a special contest that is held 
later and at which Valentino acts as judge 
and presents a silver loving cup to the 
winning couple. 

DAVIS ORCHESTRA IN ACT 

Meyer Davis' Monte Carlo Orchestra 
openctl in vaudeville on Monday at Keith's 
Palace Theatre. Statcn Island. This 
band has been in vaudeville before with 
the Monte Carlo Revue, but now goes out 
as an individual act for the first time. It 
is probable that they will be seen in a 
hotel engagement in or near New York 
during the Summer. 

MARVIN IN NEW POSITICm 

Frank Marvin, formerly manager of the 
orchestra department of Stark . & Cowan, 
has beoi engaged -in a like capacity by the 
new firm of Clarke & Leslie at 1591 
Broadway. 



OTCHESTRA.MEN IN SUIT 

Paul Specht, orchestra man, filed suit 
last week in the Third District Municipal 
Court against Ernest Golden, orchestra 
leader, for $1,000 damages and breach of 
contract 

In his complaint, Specht alleges that 
Golden contracted in November, 1922, to 
make 25 special arrangements of songs 
for him at the rate of $50 each. On Jan- 
uary 3, according to Specht, Golden re- 
fused to make any more arrangements and 
has since failed to make any as per terms 
of the agreement. At the time that the 
contract was made. Golden was connected 
with the Paul Specht offices as one of his 
leaders, but a controversy has arisen since 
as to whether or not the Golden orchestra 
is a Specht unit 



HYDE ON KEITH TIME 

Alex Hyde and his orchestra, following 
their long route over the Loew time, will 
open for Keith^ in Brockton, Mass., on- 
May 14, and will then continue over the 
Keith Circuit until they arc ready to start 
their Summer work. This orchestra has 
been together since early last Spring, and, 
followiog several weeks on the Loew time, 
went to the Hotel Shelbume, Atlantic 
City, where they played during the Sum- 
mer. It is possible that they will again 
appear at the Shelbume this Summer. 

The Siiry the Peials ToM 

« StOTHEU LSVE lALUD. 
nta li VR-eDjiKotlj * no( for jomt tmlt. Wbn 
rHwiiWiliM in ttls tamti tai 1U< paitiun oema. Wtm 
to itwTiiiilg<l Anua. FObUsbtd tir BJZAbeib fDIB- 
HADD nsoa * Ban. BOi Wot lairt stmt. Nn toa. 



April 25, 1923 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



29 




TOW FOUR 



Flowery Kingdom Songsters 

DIRECTION: A^Ue^plS^e} ^- ^' KEI™ CIRCUIT 



A BREEZE FROM THE ORIENT 
NOW PLAYING B. F. KEITH CIRCUTT 



Jack PoUdain7 
Jack Fauer { 



LOEW and INDEPENDENT 



VAUDEVILLE BILLS 

{Continued from page 27) 



JOUET, ILL. 
Orpbeam (Pint Ilalf) — O'Connor SUtcra — Cbora- 
bCrlllD & Eirle— ColllDl Ic Burt. (Second Half) 
— Biaun & Scboll — Jack George Duo — Jarrla 
Berne. 

jOPLOr, KO. 
Baotila (Pint HaU)— Walter Baker Ic Co.— 
Monte & Ljoni. (Seconil Halt)— Focb Poor. 

TTAKHOB CITT, SAX. 
Zleotile (Pint Bait) — Walmao Ic Berry — Paie. 
Hack & Hack. (Second Half) — Bobby JockKon A 
Co. — Lnbln Sc Lewis. 

KASBAB CRT, KO. 
Olnko mm Half)— Sinclair ic Or«7— HoUr- 
wood Prolica— La Salle Trio. (Second Half)— 
Trenell Trio— Rlcbardaoa Bros, it Cherry — Jlouny 
Aebler — Sylvia Dayne & Co. 

LA OBOSSE. WIS. 
RiToU — Prank Parron— Leona Hall's Rcrue. 

LEAVENWORTH, HAIT. 
Ofpheum (Sunday) — Treiioll. Trio — Rlcbardioo 
Broe. & Cherry — Jimmy Ashley — Sylvia Dayne A; 
Co. 

LIHCOUr, SEB. 
LlbsTty (First Half)— Tbree Melrlo Boy*— De 
Lorto & Blcbnrds— Billy Miller & Co.— Leo' Haley 
—Birds of Paradise. (Second Half) — Miicli & 
dalle — La Graclosa. 

IDOfWAUSEE, WIS. 
Uajeatle — Grace Ayers & Bro. — Rose A Tbome 
— Rodezo & Brown — Die Jim — Jobnson -Bros. .Be 
Jobmioo — BrowDlee's BlckrlUe Fellies — Cbandoo 
Trio. 

xzmiEAPoLis, iinnr. 

■-BeTentli Sfaeet — Tbe Earls — France' A Jerome — 
Otto ' 8c Hammer — Revue Resplendent — Hickman 
Bros. 

. . VOBFOLK, IIEB. 
. Audlterlun. (Sandsyl-^-Tbree UelvlB Brattaer* — 
Leo Haley — Birds 'of raradlse. (Friday & £^tur- 
.dsy) — Dn Ball -Sc McKensle — Gordon A Spain — 
Four Songster*. • ^; 

OBbSOBK, WIB. ^ 
Oimnd^Qpers Honss — Boattlno A Barrette — Lam. - 
liert & FUb. 

PEOBiA. nx. 

Oirbenm (Pint Half)— Jobn & Nellie 01ms— 
7.ocal — Jack George Dao — Gladys Delracr A Boys 
— Four Tamakls. (Second Half)— Spencer Ai Wll' 
Hams — Catherine SJecUIV & Co. 

auiMcr, ILL. 

Orphenm (Flmt Half) — Stnnley, Doyle A.Reno 
— Simpson A Dean — Jordan Olrls. (Second Half) 
— Will. J. Ward— Favorllea of tbe Past. 

RAOQIE, 'WIS, 
Blalto — WllAon Aubrey Trio— Gsffoey A Walton 
— MIddleton & Spellmeyer^Fonr Glrton Olrla. 

ST. JOE. MO. ' 
Elootrio (Pint nair)— Mack A Velmar — Lnbln 
.A Levis — Four Roses. (Second Half) — Page. 
Hack A Mack — Tbree Minstrels — Leo Haley — 
Birds of Paradise. 

ST. LOUIS, KO. 
Colombia (Plist Half)- LeVere A (Villas— OaS- 
mey A Walton — Bobby Brewater — Valentine Vor. 
(Second Half) — Hollywood Frolics — Jones A 8yl< 
Tester. 

BUlto (Pint Half)- Wilson Anbrey THo— Love 
Twins- lyitr A Crollus — Blckcy A Hart Bovne. 
(Second Half)— Bolllday A Wlllett. 

OxBsd — Alberto — Hager A Goodwin — Allen's , 
Minstrels- Moore A Fields — Ned Nestor A Co.— 
Miller, Packer A Selz— Annsbelle — Cowla A Verdi 
— Peggy Bremen A Bro. 

aionz CIT7, IOWA 

Orpbenm (Plist HalO — Aerial Valentines — How- 
ard A Clark— La Grasdoaa. (Second Bait)— BlUy 
Miller A Co. — Poor Fords. 



BOITTH BEHD, IVS. 
Palaoe (First Half)— Coulter A Bose— Byama A 
Mrlntyrc — Sunley Chapman. (Second Halt) — 
Robinson A Pierce — Lea Oellls. 

BPB07GFXELD. QX. 
Kajeitio (First Half )— Pere* -A Matsuerlts— 
FIsber & GUmora — Wlllaid Jarvls A Co. — ^Tbe 
Floicnls. (Second ' Half)— Tost A Clady— I.am 
Twlna — BIckey A Hart Bevne — Poor- Tamakis. 

SPBIHOriELS, KO. 
Elootrlo (First Half)— Foch Poor. (BaeoBd 
Bait)— Walter Baker A Co.— Monte A Lyona. 
'r t-' M TTT* SAUTE, XHJ). 
Hlppadnaa (First Halt)— Tost A Cl'ady— Bn- 
blnl sisters— Les Oellls. (Second Halt)— Peia A 
Uargnerlte— Desley Slater* A Co. 

TOFEXA, XAS. 
SoTaltj (First Half)— Trenell Ttlo— RIcbtrdsoB 
Bros. A Cberry — Jimmy Ashley — Sylvia Dayne A 
Co. (Second Half) — Le Lorto A Richards— Mack 
A Velmar — Four Boaea. 



MARCUS LOEW CIRCUIT 
Wc«k of April 22, 1923 

HEW TOBX CITT 

Amsricu (First Half) — Uaxlne A Bobby — Botb 
Davis — Verdi A Glenn — Dlnus A Belmont Bovne— 
Harris A Holly— Marston A Manley — Fern. .Blge- 
low A King. (Second Half)— Same G. Mann — 
Bayes & Smitb — Joe Stanley A Co. — Stevens A 
Brnnelle— White, Black A Useless— Sweeney A 
Walter* — Melnotte Duo. 

Orpkeom (Pint Balf)— Criterion roop— Mason 
A Cole Bevne — Cella Weston A Co.— Boy A Ar- 
tbnr. (Second Bait)— Mabel Drew— Phil. Baker 
Amaranth Sister*. 

national (PUst Hsif)— Billy KInkald— Bteveo* 
A Brnnelle— Jofdan. Saxton A 0>. — Berry A Lan- 
caster — Klrksmlth.'^sters. (Second Bait) — Archie. 
Onrl A DoUy— Flo A OlUs Walter*— Prey A Jor- 
dan—Emily Daireu- Billy Oerher Revue. 

Gr*ele7 S^mii* (Plf*t Half)— Hashl A Osal — 
Artie Noinn— ^Bayea A ■ Smith — Loolse Carter A 
Co. — Leitr A Kennedy— Homer GIrIa A Co. (Sec- 
ond Half) — Radium Vision*— Ross A Edwards- 
O'Connor A Clifford — Dinna A Belmont Bevne — 
Sossman A Sloane — Uobert Dyer A Co. 

Delaaoer Street (First Half )— Badlnm Visions— 
SImms A Wynne — Sara B. Hann— Cbu. Bosen A 
Co. — Bernard A To«-oca — Carlo* Clrcns. (Second 
Half) — Barrls A Holly — Lebr A Kennedy — Jordan 
Saxton A Co. — Barry A Lancaster — Stanley A 
Alv«. 

Bonlevard (First Half) — Paynes- White, Black 
A Useless — Laurie Ordway A Co. — Evelyn Phillips 
lA Ce: (Second Halt)— Billy KInkald— Stut* A 
Blngham'.rTJack nallen A Co. — Moss A Frye — 
Homer Girls A Co. 

BUt« (Pint Half)— Hubert Dyer * Co.— Dreon 
Sister* — Sossmon A Sltene — Stars Record — Clifton 
A DeRex — Amarsntb Sister*. (Second Half) — 
Fern, Blgelew A King— Brttt A sCliaocd— KUIer 
A Bradford — Clifton A DeBex — Jack Connor'a 
Revoe, 

Avenno B (First Half) — Kr*yono Radio Co. — 
Stntx A Bingham — Trovoto— Basil' A Allen — Day 
at ContT Island. (Second Half) — ^Ttoylaod FoUle* 
—Roy A Arthnr— Al Wilson— Walter Manthey A 
Co. 

r|pi**i" Sqoan (First Half) — Fletcher A Fas- 
qnale — O'Connor A Clllfonl— lack Ballen A Co. — 
Stute A Bingham — Isblkawa Japs. (Second Half) 
— Faynea — Dreon Sister* — Lonise Carter A Co. — 
Bernard A Tovmes — WIU. Stanton A Co. 

VIotorU (Flnt Halt)- Melnotte Duo— Bidden 
Voice*— ^tniDdvd — Bert naolon — Jack Connor'a 
Bevne. (Second Half)— Isblkawa Japs— Delbridge 
A Gremmer — Vine A Temple — Jennings A Domey 
-Five KIrknnltti Slsten. 

Pallsado Park (flatorday A Sunday) — Ecko A 
Keyo — Recoycle A Oskford— Pelei* A Le Bins. 

BBOOZLTB, H. T. 
Palao* (First Half)- LlUan Steele A Co.— Al 
Wilson— Mor«n A Wiser. (Second Half)— Basil 
Girls A Co. 



KatfopoUtan ' (First Halt)— Leach LaQolnlan 
Trlo-^Flo-dc- Oille ' WalUr*— NrwhoS A Pbelps — 
Jennings A Domey. (Second Hslf)- Hidden 
Vdlte*— Money Sister*— Mason A Cole Bevue. 

Oatas (First Halt)— LeHoen A Dnpreece— Boss 
A Edwards— Miller A Bndfofd— Vine A Temple 
-^oe Stanley A Co. (Second Half)— MaHne A 
Bobby— Laarle Ordwny A Co.— Stranded— Nawboff 
A Phelps— Naomi A Braslllan NuU. 

Fnltan ■ (First Half)— Areble. Onrl A Dolly- 
Delbndge A Gremmer — Gr«y A Byron — Moaa A 
Frre— Billy Gerber Bern*. (Second Half)— La- 
Boen A Dnpreece — Bert Hanlon — Stat* Becnd. 

Warwlsk (First flsif)— Berdle Kraemei^In the 
Pntnre — Clayton A Lennle — Toyland Pollle*. (Sec- 
ond Halt)— Krayono Radio A O.— Sperling A BeU 
— Herman Bemns— Day at Coney laland. 

Aatorla (Firat Bait)— Stanley A Alvn— Mabel 
Drew— Frey A Jordan— Phil. Baker — Gordon. Gir- 
lie A Gordoo. (Second Halt)— Leacb LtQnInlin 
Trio— SImma A Wynne— Manton A Manley — Chas. 
Rogera A Cb. — Cella Weston A Co.— Evelyn Phil- 
lips A Co. 

BALTWOBZ, KD. 
Blppadranw— Maod Ellet A Co. — Chick A Tiny 
Harvey— Matthews A Ayi*s— Lsrry Harklns A Co. 



A Allen — Trovoto — Alexander, 



la last word of daoclnf. 



FEATURES AT PARADISE 

Rye, N. Y.. April 23.— Paradise Paric. 
which is but twelve miles from New York 
City, has one o( the most magnificat frost 
and entrance arches ever placed in front 
of a park. The park also has over 800 
feet of board -walk. There are fifty-six 
stores and concession stands, nearly all oc- 
cuined. A Whip, Carrooselle, Circle 
Swings, Dodgem, Race-OWay and Pony 
Track are some of the other attractioos. 
Miller and Baker are now bailding a Giant 
Roller Coaster, which is said will be the 
most sensational ride ever put out by this 
firm. 



THOMPSON & COVAN 



„ aful sMsiwi la vnudsvUIs, sbIUbc witb Flaatatiaa RaviM to 

open at tba Pavllloa, l<nV»i, Eaglaad. 



BOSTOB, KAB8. 
Onlieam — Lillian Morton — Tuck A cure — 
Tooner A Day— McCoy A Wslton— Alex. Hyde's 

Orchestra. 

BUFFALO. H, T, 
Biato— Alvsre* Duo — Jean Boydell — Mr. A Miv. 
N. PhllUps A Co.— Clark A O'Neill— WUI. MorrU- 
sey A Movie Star*. 

OUEVllLAin), OHIO 
Loow'B— Plckard's Seals — Green A Hyra— Frank 
Ford A Co. — Alton A Allen— CosmopollUn Danc- 
er*. 

HOBOKBg, H. J. 
loaw'a (Pint Balf)— Bob Carney— PrankUa A 
Peggy — Fletcher, Janlta A Dolan. (Second Half) 

-^Berdle Kracoer — The Broken Minor Cbas. 

Leonard Fletcher — Tbe Dnponta. 

LOHDOH, OAV. 
Lo*«'« (Pirat Bait)— Uttle Plpplfax A Co.— 
May McKay A. SUtera— Barr, Mayo A Bonn. 
(Second Half)— Maurice A Girlie— LaVlne A 
Mayne— Banban Orob* A Co. 

KOBTBEAL, CAV. 
Lo*w'»— Bell A, Eva— Norton A Wilson- BeU 
Bros. — Nsncy Boyer A Co. — Thoa. Potter Dnnna — 
Edw. SlanlsloS A Co. 

' HFWABX, H. J. 
Btato— Ford A Price— PUher A Shepiartf— How- 
ard A Boss — Lane A Mono — J. Boaaosond Joba- 
aoo A Co. 

OTTAWA, OAS. 
Btate— Prevost A Goelet— Stevens A Lanrel — 
Overholt A Young — Jsrrow — Greenwich VUlager*. 

PROVISEBOE, B. I. 
EmsiT (Flnt Bait)- F. J. Sidney A Co.— Con- 
roy A Howard — Joseph E. Bernard A Co. — Fred. 
A Tbminy Harden— Dolly'a Dream. (Second Balf) 
—Monroe A Gnnt— Martelle FaDet A Co.— Amo- 
ros A Jeanette — Boys of Long Ago. 

SPBIBOFmS, KASS. 
Bmadwny (Flnt Balf)— Monroe A Grant— Mar- 
celie Pallet A Co.— Amero* A Jeanette — Boya of 

Long Ago. (Second Half)— F. J. Sidney A Co. 

Conroy A Howard— Joseph E. Bernard A Co.— 
F>«d. A Tommy Bayden— Dolly'a Dream. 

TOBOBTO, OBT„ OAS, 
Tonga Btnat — Zsra Csrmen Trio — Burt A Lot- 
tie Walton— Young A Grant— Hanson A Barton 

SIstsi* — Harrlseo Moss — Tanan. 

WABB3B0T0B. S. 0. 
Btnnd— Dial ' Monkeya— Fox A Skelty— Carey. 
Bannon A Marr — Barry Abrams A Co. 



PAUL TURNER RETURNS 
Paul N. Turner, chief counsel of the 
Actors' Equity Associatioii, who recently 
recovered from a siege of illness and has 
been recuperating at Galveston, Tejcas. has 
returned to town and Is ready to eontinue 
hisioSt^ duties. 



RUDLOFF BROS. OPEN 

Rudloff Bros, opened their ExpositioD 
Shows with Rides and Concession at Tot- 
tensville, S. I., New York, Thursday, April 
19, °and will close here the first week in 
May and join the Standard 'Amusement 
Exposition with their rides and concessions. 



BOOM AND METZ OPENING 

■Morris Boom and Heddy Metz left New 
York City this week with their rides for 
Niagara Falls, N. Y., to join the Knicker- 
bocker Shows, which open there Friday, 
April 27. Mr. Metz will also have his 
ten in one and a string of co n ce s sions. 



MOORE SHOW CLOSING 

The John W. Moore Indoor Grcns will 
close the season at New 'Haven. Conn., 
April 28. The circus has had a wonderful 
wmter. Last week they closed an engage- 
ment at Altoona, Pa., and turned them 
away at every performance.- 

FITZGERALD IN N. Y. 

Harry Fitzgerald, an old-time circus 
man and now connected with the Keith 
House at Greenville, S. C, passed through 
New York last week on the -way to his (>Id 
home in Ogdensburg, N. Y. . 



STANDARD SHOWS OPENING 

The Standard Exposition Shows, FbiL 
Hamburg manager, which was recoitly 
organized by Phil. Hamburg, James Lent 
and T. Slaine, will open at Yonkers, N. Y., 
Saturday. May 5. 



RUBIN AT HAVANA PARK 

A. Rubin, who left here last winter 'with 
the World's Standard Shows, Hughes, Kiu 
and Hamilton, managers, for a South 
American tour, has left that orgarization 
and is now connected with the Havana 
Park, Havana. Cuba. Mr. Rubin is now 
in New York looking over several novelties 
which he will take back to Cuba with him. 



GERARD SHOWS START 

The Gerard Greater Shows opened their 
1923 season at Yonkers, N. Y., Saturday, 
April 2S, making the third show in Yon- 
kers this season. 



Gorgeous Gold Baronette Cyclorama. 
Large, fireproof lined, border, trunk; 
Also Gold Baronette drop in one. 
Both new; Bargains! 

BROOKS, Pfysmth Hotd, N*w Ycsk Qlr 



ROY 



LUCILLE 



BOB 



AND 



in a Dancmg Direraion Written and Produced by ROY SHELDON 



After Playing B. F. KEITH'S PALACE, NEW YORK (AprU 16), and Acclaimed 
by the Daily Press of N. Y. ms Being Ona of the Ontstaodiog Successes on the BiH 
u Well as One of the Seaaom't Beat Daneior Offeringa in Vaudeville. 



Direction ROSE & CURTIS 
This week April 23, B. F. Kath, Washington 



30 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 25, 1923 



DEATHS 



MRS. WNNIE WALSH TOWME. Riind 
u jucci I smser, died on Uoaday of last week, at 
her home, 25 Pcnn Atrect, Bmoklyn. As 
M^ie Walsh the sane in leading diniches in 
Manhattan and BrooklTO in later yean. 

Miss Walsh came into fame carlj in hcr 
carecr when a nmnlMT of the chores of Gilbert 
and SalliTan's **Piratcs of Pcnxaacc" at the 
old Fifth ATcnne Theatre, New York. The 
prima became til and the chores singer 

took her part, p e i foi m ing with unusual ar- 
tistiy. 

She went on tonr for two years m the same 
T^e and later toored both Canada and the 
United States with Fjwma Jnch in concert. 
She is BorviTed by two brothers and a sister. 



JAILED FOR CHEATING AUTOMAT 

Sigbund Stem, an actor who had small 
parts in "Bine Paradise," "The Passmg 
Show of 1915," and the Hippodrome, but 
who has not been connected with any the- 
atrical enterprise- for several years, was 
arrested oa Monday and in Special Ses- 
sions before Justices Herbert, Salmen and 
Voorbies, sentenced to 30 days in the work- 
house for attempting to cheat the Auto- 
mat. 

. Stem, who had failed as actor and 
had lost a good deal of money around the 
race-track, had made the. acquaintance of 
a sailor on a German ship and from him 
purchased several dollars' worth of Ger- 
man pfemiigs. This coin, although worth 
only about four one-thousandths of a cent, 
is stboot the size and shape of an American 
nickel and Stem used the pfamigs in the 
Antomat slot instead of the American 
coin, imtit detectives, on the watch for the 
one who was doing this particular form 
of cfaeatiiig, caught him in the act. Stem 
had figured that, taking the rate of ex- 
change into consideration, $1 worth of 
pfennigs would feed him for over a month. 



BIG CELEBRATION FOR LINICKS 

Chicago, April 21. — Many prominent 
theatrical and society people gathered in 
the Tiger Room of the Sherman Hotel 
last Sunday evening to celebrate the sil- 
ver wedding arniivcrsary of Mr. and Mrs. 
.^dolph T imrlf Mr. Ltnick is a member 
of the firm of Jones, Linick and Schaefcr, 
pioneer theatre owners of Chicago. 
' Among the prominent guests present 
were: Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Jones, Mr. 
and Mrs. Peter J. Schaefer, Mr. and 
Mrs. Adolph Zukor, Mr. and Mrs. Marcus 
Loew. Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Ascher, Mr. 
and Mrs. John J. Jooes, Mr. and Mrs. 
Henry L. Newfaouse, Judge and Mrs. 
Joseirii Sabath, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel 
Schweitzer. Mr. and Mrs. Will H. Wade. 
Mr. and Mrs. Leonard H. Wolf, Mr. and 
Mrs. Ralph T. Kettering. Mr. and Mrs. 
Darid Braham, Mr. and Mrs. Norman £. 
Field and Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Weisman. 

There were 170 guests there for the 
dinner at 6 P. M. which was followed by 
dancing and a cotillion. It was one of the 
nwst elaborate parties given in Chicago 
in many months. 



"THE APACHE" COMING IN 

"The Apache," a new play in a prologue 
and three acts by Josephine Turck Baker, 
will -open at the Punch and Judy Theatre 
on Monday evening. >May 7. The play has 
a subtitle. "Thoughts .\re Things." which 
sheds no light on its nature. 



.REYNOLDS GOES TO EUROPE 

James Reynolds, creator of scenic inves- 
tures was dispatched to Europe la^ Satur- 
day by Florenz Ziegfekl, Jr., for the pur- 
pose of obtaining novehies for the next 
Ziegfeld Follies which will be produced 
this Summer. 



MUSICIANS' TROUU.ES STILL ON 

A heated discussion took place at the 
meeting of Mutual Musical Protective 
Union, formerly local 310 of the Ameri- 
can Federation of Musicians which began 
at midnight Tuesday and continued until 
early this morning over the stand which 
the organization would take on the dis- 
charge of Abe Nussbaum, secretary of the 
organization, from the orchestra of Ac 
Astor theatre last week. The night of 
' Nnssbaimi's discharge the other men in 
the orchestra walked out with him and 
Weiner Jannsen, composer of "Lady 
Butterfly" played the musical accompani- 
aent for Oe attraction on the piano. The 
next day all of the men but Nussbaum and 
the dmmiiier returned. Nussbaum was 
eliminated from the orchestra when he 
resigned his membership from Local 802 
and was ordered to flay $49 to the organiza- 
tion or be barred from playing. Nussbaum 
claimed he had a transfer card from the 
Chicago local of the musician's union and 
that this would permit him to play. "The 
local union 802 mied differently and he re- 
fused to pay the amount. 

Nussbaum with a score of men implored 
the meeting to take some action on the 
matter, claiming that unless something was 
done the cause of 310 would be lost. 



SAVES MONEY OS MUSICIANS 

Louis Werba has taken dollars and 
cents into the production of "Adrienne," 
the new musical comedy which he will 
present at the Garrick Theatre Ma^ 14. 
Werba found that in taldng musicians 
from New York to Philadelphia, he 
would save money. The scale for men in 
Philadelphia being $75 a week, while men 
could be gotten from New York to tour 
with the company for $65 a week. Werba 
figured not onl^ would he have a saving 
but the musicians that he would take 
along with him to Philadelphia would be 
utilized for the production when it had 
its premiere in New York. As a result, 
twenty-four New YoHc men will be car- 
ried with the troupe and at the same time 
Werba will be $240 in pocket. 



MUSICAL STOCK FOR DALLAS 

A musical stock company that will jH-e- 
sent light opera and well known musical 
comedy successes, has been o'tganized for 
the Interstate Amusement Company's 
Majestic 'Theatre, at Dallas, Texas, by 
Milton Abom. The coinpany under the 
management of H. H. Winchell, will open 
there on April 29, and is composed of 
forty singers including principals and 
chorus. 'The engagement at the Majestic 
is for fifteen weeks with the possibility of 
other theatres of the Interstate chain in 
the south being played later. 

The first three shows to be preii-nted 
vfill be "The Firefly," "Going-Up" and 
"Sweetheart," with other similar type 
plays to follow. The list of principals in- 
clude: Maude Gray, Virginia Watson. 
Edith Bradford. Irene Gatell Beatrice 
Moore, George Shields, Lee Daly. Rex 
Carter, Dan Marble and Frederick Rogers. 
Clarence West will be musical director, 
and Augustus Buell stage director. Three 
carloads of special scenery is leaving with 
the company this week, the whole enter- 
prise bemg mostly responsible to the ef- 
forts of Karl Hoblitzelle. president of the 
Interstate Amusement Company. 



TRY OUT FOR "MARY AND JOHN" 

"Mary and John." a new comedy by 
Maravene Thompson, will be tried out in 
stock by the Forsythe Players of Atlanta. 
Ga. on May 12. Enid Bennett, moving 
picture actress, has been engaged for the 
leading feminine role, and several New 
York managers will visit Atlanta to look 
over the production, which opens on May 
12. 



EQUITY PARTY ON MAY 12 

An Equity May Party will be held in 
the Grand Ballroom of the Hotel Astor 
on Saturday evening. May 12. The direc- 
tion of the affair will be in charge of 
George Le Guere, who is assembling com- 
mittees of prominent stage folk who will 
combine forces in making the forthcoming 
event both an artistic and financial suc- 
cess. 

The May Party will be given in lieu 
of the usual anniul Equity show and the 
proceeds will be devoted to Equity's 
"stranded fund," which forwards expense 
money and transportation to members of 
ill-fated productions, which otherwise 
would be left stranded. 

The ballroom will be decorated to rep- 
resem a flower garden in May and there 
will be a May Carnival Pageant, in which 
several hundred prominent stage favorites 
will participate. In addition there will be a 
cabaret entertainment that will have as 
many stellar turns as a three-ring circus.' 



LETTER LIST 



BERNARD MARRIAGE ANNULLED 

Supreme Court Justice Cohalan, last 
week dismissed the divorce suit brought 
by actor Nat Bernard against Adah Bern- 
ard, and granted to Mrs. Bernard an an- 
nulment decree on her plea that Bernard 
was a resident of New York when he was 
divorced in Califomia in 1911, by Rosalind 
Pomeroy Bernard, who was wedded to 
him in CHclahoma in 1907. 

For that reason the Justice held that the 
Califomia divorce was not valid in New 
York because service of the papers was not 
made as required by the New York laws, 
and the marriage of Bernard to the de- 
fendant in the present case was not valid. 

Concerning the decision, the Court said: 

"Adah Bernard claims here that believing 
him (Bernard) to have been legally di- 
vorced, she married him in New York in 
1912, lived with him until November, 1919, 
and divorced him in Pennsylvania in De- 
cember, 1921. She married one Skblny in 
this city on Christmas Day, 1921. Nat 
Bernard in March, 1922, began this action 
a^inst her for divorce, and she then sued 
him for an annulment of marriae^ Nat 
Bernard claims that he did not live in New 
York in the periods of 1910 and 1911, dur- 
ing which Rosalind Pomeroy Bernard was 
suing him for divorce, but that he lived in 
the State of Illinois, where «he require- 
ments as to a foreicn divorce are different 
from those of our State. 

"I am satisfied from a careful exam- 
ination of the record and from fair consid- 
eration of the probabilities that he moved 
to the city when he was entering his 'teens' 
and has concededly lived here during most 
of his life. To be sure, he says that for 
some time before March, 1911, he resided 
in Chicago, but I am satisfied that his stay 
there was casual and only in the line of 
convenience in hisr calling as an actor, and 
that all the time he not alone was, but al- 
ways claimed to 'be, a resident of New 
York. 

"This is home out by a fair reading of 
the last testimony given by him and by his 
declarations that it was an advantage for 
one earning a living in his line to register 
as from New York. If this were so, as 
testified to by him, in the case of one who 
actually resided at some other place, how 
mudb more likely is it that he would act- 
ually retain his residence here rather than 
transfer it while he was for a short time 
elsewhere to that place." 

Justice Cohalan's ruling validates the de- 
fendant's marriage to her present hnsband, 
Skolny, which was made the basis of the 
divorce action, on the ground that her 
Pennsylvania divorce from Bernard was 
not binding in New York: 



UOlU 
Bsllcy, His. E. 
BskEr, Ewljn 



UoitaT, DoUr 



BcnutD', Dolly 
BoMAe, Jme 
BooUi, Bdm, 



BnndoD. Bdls 
BmHD. Ksthlm 
Braoks, Usui* 
Nina 



BunDllb. BllUs 
Bldi. Ids. 

BOBllO, ElSlfl p. 

Bmak, Un. B. 

Sheppui), Mil. 

Uuy 
Soisrt, Helen 
SImrt, EleuDr 
suae. Anlla 



Osos, M. 

Cos, imr 

ClwinlnshsBL 
nuusm E. 
Dsyloo, Vie 
Fsvomsffl. 



Ckntflr, I^nii 
dsik. Nellls 
Cwnell, FlsBcei 
Diwui, PrlncoM 
Fai, Oice C 
HsiTls, PbdUm 
HsnteB. i,iHtL> 
KKltf. Osce 
KcUcT, P. 
Ls lluto. Hein 
Htrki. His. Los 
Kay, Pesri 



Wetila. Use 
WUU. Uibtl 
nuis. Mis. 

UuUkw 
Weofleld. Emu 
^OljsiBi, EsUuyii 

CEITUHEI ' 

BcU, Jotasnls 
Bertnnd, Fruk 
BlaoB, Hsny E. 
Bnnt. E. M. 
Bohlcr, BUI 



Flna, JsBS J. 
Fraikr, Fata 
OUletu. Bobtir 
Usnhsll. a 6. 
UeOlfm, Flask 
Mlllir, Won 
Ullii, Dh 
Poms. loo 
Udell, Cbm. EL ' 
Van. Jo* 
Vllluaaa, Jdu 
E. 

Vital*. D. 
Wslowriakt, Wm. 
Wdli, OUBt 

nuu, Bm 
WllllsBi, Bob 
wink. Geov !>• 



ROSENTHAL AT CONVENTION 

J. C. Rosenthal, general manager of 
the American Society of Composers, Au- 
thors and Publishers, left for Chicago^ 
Tuesday, in connection with the radio 
broadcasting situation. 

On Wednesday of this week he will 
talk before the people assembled at the 
National Radio Broadcasters' Convention, 
being held at. the Drake HoteL and will 
in the course of his address tell the side 
of the composers, authors and publishers 
in the radio license controversy. 

The following day, on Thursday, Mr. 
Rotenthal will call a meeting of the branch 
managers of the publisher members of the 
society, for the imrpose of explaining to 
them the policy of the publishers and the 
attitude of the home omce of the respec- 
tive representatives in regard to the broad- 
casting of copyrighted music for profit. 
The policy of the publishers, he will ex- 
plain, is not to do anything that will hinder 
the progress of the A. S. C. A. & P. 



SHERMAN TO STAR IN "CASANOVA" 

Al. H. Woods and Gilbert Miller on 
Monday signed an agreement whereby 
Lowdl Shemann will ancar under their 
joint management at the Eltinge Thea^e, 
early in August in "Casanova," a Spanish 
play. The translation of the play was 
made by Margaret Miller with the adap- 
tation being handled by Sidney Howard. 



GOLDREYER HAS A SON 

Michael Goldreyer, of Mindlin and 
Goldreyer, producers of "The Last Warn- 
ing." did not let his_ partner get much the 
best of him in adding to the populace of 
the city for on Sunday he announced that 
Mrs. Goldreyer became the mother of an 
eight pound son at the Brooklyn Methodist 
hospital. Michael, Jr., as the youngster 
will be known and his mother arc enjoying 
good health at the institution. 



MOROSCO GETS MUSICAL PLAY 

"Believe Me," a new musical comedy by 
William Morris, has been added to the 
roster of new plays which Oliver Morosco 
will try out with his stock company in 
Los Angeles this Summer. 

FOR SALE 

GERMAN 
POLICE PUPS 

HIGHLY PEDIGREED 
FROM CHAMPION STOCK 
$50 TO $75 EACH 
R. BRADFORD 

360 West SSlIi St. Phone 10364 Circl» 



HITCH YOUR TALENTS TO A REAL CIRCUIT 

HR& M. I. KEU-Y. OF THE M- 1. KEIiY "^^^^^^^J^SAaiBJ^mSm Am 0°^^ ^ NOVELTV ACTS FOR A TOUR OF HER 



EAWI.E BUILDING ^ \9k^ ^ I iUC | |^ BOOKING 

SUITE ai4-is-ie w~^^^w^w-^ ^ w ^ ii^^^. ofitice 

SEASON OF M WEEKS BZnd ST. mad BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY HALF SALARY FOR REHEARSALS 

J u'LrLnj~ i n n ~ Lru~Li~LrM~ ri iriru'irinjTjTjajTj^ nnr^^ - - » - - - - ^ - ^ - ^ ^- ^^ - ^ ^- ^^ - ^^ .^ ^^ -^-^- ^ j.^^^ r\n-rLrLrvi-ri_ri_n. 



n/l W Ti{t:\nuc \!. 

\ll (:■:,::,■:.■ nil \ .'.-i.-:-,^ kV./^ 
Inn \.t <l:,iri l '.-.' ; — 



April 25, 1923 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



E. F. ALBEE 
Pmideat 



J. J. MURDOCK 



F. F. PROCTOR 
Vice-PkMident 



B. F. 

Vaudeville Exchange 

(AGENCY) 

(Palace Tliaam BnOfaf , N«w York) 

B. F. KEITH EDWARD F. ALBEE A. PAUL KEITH 
F. F. PROCTOIU-FOUNDERS 

Aitiita Can Book Dinct by Addrtauiac W. Daytoa Waca&rfk 



PLAYS 



For STOCK. REPERTOIRE, AMATEUR COMPANIES 



LARGEST ASSORTMENT IN THE WORLD. Boola for home 
amiuemcnt. Nesn plAy*. Papcr, SceneoT, Mrs. Jailey's Wu 
World. Caulogne Frcel FrccI Frcel 

SAMUEL FKENCH, a Wot Mth St, N«w YcA 



Insure Your Material Against Theft 

REGISTER YOUR ACT 

SEND IN YOUR MATERIAL 

I 

THIS COUPON win be nufflbered and attached and a certificate will be retnnied to 
Ton aa an admowledcmeat and for future nfcrencc The contribntion should be alined 
plainly hy the person or firm sending the same, and should be endorsed by the stage 
manager of the show or of the boose where the act is being used, or other witneaics. 
Further aelmowledgmcat will be made by the names and numbers betng published. 

Address your contribntion to 



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' Date 

NEW YORK CLIPPER REGISTRY BUREAU 



EbcIomJ find copy of mj. 



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far Ragutralioii. 

Ni 



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CERTinCAns ISSUED 



1735 — Harold A. Keme — Sonc 

1736 — Three Kcairdi^Act 

1737 — MorxiB & Bernard — ^ong. 
171g— Pott Clasa — Sodr Poenu. 

1739— Real & Blalic— Bbteria]. 

1740— Jenniiin & Mdba — NoTdtr Coctune. 

1741— Brian M. Jewett— TlUe. 

1742— Wyie & Bros— TiUe. 



1743 — R. Brewnlec — AcL 

1744 — Harrcr Sanfsrd — Poena. 

1745— Lon AttcU— Sons Title. 

174< — Anton Lada — Orcheftra Titlei. 

1747 — Donna Darlins — Sonff. 

1748 — Sidney B. HoTcomb— Ljrics. 

1749 — ^Thomai Sicnrdion — Lyrics & Htutc. 



WORTH 
WHILE 



Toupees Make-Up 

S«I for Prica Llat 
G. bHINDHELM 
108 W. 4Mh St., N«w Verlc 



CENTRAL 



WARDR06C 

Eqaal to aaj 

1)60.00 Tmk 

I Ceilnl Tmk 

Faclsiy 
ISOlONSftCO. 

Pblla. 



MONEY WRITING SONGS 



sic 

jOalB . 

noxa. CoDtntsi CutiaUiiu Your 
Faultii, Wrftfaw ■ Malady, OIncllu tta ' 
~ Tladbac TOi» 



•ad poUUiBr 



Bafora tlw PlAUe. Lbta mr SM Mnalc Da£ 
m at Baad and Orchaatra Iiimlwa. Yea 
naed tUa book, only ona of Ita kkd « tte 
oaikit. ObIt tlM Postpaid. Monar lack If 
nu so. UNIOff MUSIC COMPANY, SU 
East Fifth St., r-fc— »— -M, aUo. 



Every Manager and Agent 

SHOULD OWN a cbpt of 
THE JULIUS CAHN-CUS HILL GUIDE 

contaioinff 
All tho EiBcntlBl Faeu of the Slow 
Bnalncas. 
20tli Edition, Price $I.0O net— 1921 
21it Edition Snpplement, Price flJO net 
— 192Z. $4J0 Comptete 

JUUUS CAHN— GUS HOI. GUIDE 
IT, 711 Tih ATSh, Nev Yaek Cl^ 



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CIRCUIT 

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Llbaral prepMHloB to asparlaeod maa. 

A^MlNUTE SALES CO., St. Pkul» Kasi. 



WIGS 



■sal Hunas Ealr Impertsd: Uih Cemadlaa, 7«w, Bntsb' 
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Lar«jt UammftturfTM •/ Tkimtl li'at Fm*- 
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CLIPPER 

BUSINESS INDEX 

ANOIALS 

Henrr Bartela, 72 Cortlandt St^ New York. 
Louis Ruhe, 3S1 Bowery, New York. 
Wm. Bartels Co., 44 Cortlandt St., New York 
City. 

BAZAAR a EXPOSITION SUPPLIES 

Bloch Prsnium Sales Corporation, 28 West 22nd 
St., New York City. 

LAWYEII5 

F. L. Boyd, 17 No. La Salle St.. Chicago. 
SCENERY 

Kahn & Beuwman Scenic Studio 

ISS W. 29th St., N. Y. City. Chebea 89J«. 

SCENERY FOR RENT 

Amelia Grain, 819 Spring Garden St, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

TENTS 

J. C. Goal Co., 10 Atwaler St., Detroit, Mich. 
Send for Second-hand list. 



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Weeks Trunk Gompuy, 511 Braadway. 



Ika PleeadBIy aop^ M Boylstea St. 
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Motan Brothers, 387 WaaUagtoa St. 
CHARLESTON. S. C. 

Charleatoa Trunk Company, M Xlav Sc 
CLEVELAND. OHIO. 

Otdo Horse Goods C&, 1744 East Utt St. 
GRAND RAPIDS. MICH. 

Grand Raoida Trunk Col, 39 DlrWoo 
St, Sondi. 
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H. R. Knapp, ZB Soatb Coatio Sl 
SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

S^cnae Trunk Works, 444 Ssotk Uiaa 

TOLEDO. O. 

Tbe Wilmlnston €&. Z>S Summit A**. 
TROY. N. Y. 

W. B. Frear ft Obmpaay 
WILKES BARRE. PENNA. 

Brecar & Ycager, 9 Mala Sttast. 

woRcasm. mass. 

The Bsnafe Shop. S7I Haia I ti sa t 

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READ WHAT THE NEW YORK NEWSPAPERS SAY OF THIS COLOSSUS OF 1923 

**Bigge9t and best circus that the RingUng Bros, and Barnirm & Bailey have ever staged." — N. Y. Sun. 
"Never equalled in sawdust history." — N. Y. Eve. Journal. 
"Greatest of all shows." — ^JV. Y. American. 

"Bigger than ever. The best things that mankind and brutekind have ever done." — N. Y. Telegraph. 

"City hails the circoB as the best ever. Packed with more and bigger thrills." — N. Y. Herald. 

"The bigger, the better and greater than ever circus." — N. Y. World. 

"Outdoes all former years." — N. Y. Globe. 

"Goes out for a new record and makes it." — N. Y. Eve. Post. 

"The Greatest Show on Earth is bigger and more amazing than ever." — N. Y. Eve. World. 



NOW— TRAVELING ON ITS 100 DOUBLE LENGTH CARS— ENTERING 
UPON THE MOST EXTENSIVE ROAD TOUR IN CIRCUS HISTORY. HEAR 
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Credits 



Scanned from the microfilm collection of 
Q. David Bowers 



Scanning sponsored by Q. David Bowers and 
Kathiyn Fuller-Seeley 



Post-processing completed as part of Project Arclight 
( http://projectarclight.org }. a Digging into Data project 
sponsored by SSHRC and IMLS 



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Library ( http: / /mediahistoryprojectorg }